Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £4.99

Save £15.01 (75%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Storm and Conquest: The Battle for the Indian Ocean, 1808-10 by [Taylor, Stephen]
Kindle App Ad

Storm and Conquest: The Battle for the Indian Ocean, 1808-10 Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 67 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£4.99

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

"For sheer excitement, what most gripped me was Storm and Conquest ... as thrilling as anything by Patrick O'Brian." -- Jeremy Paxman, Books of the Year, Observer

"Taylor has written a ferociously good book ... an incredible tale." -- Sebastian Junger, author of The Perfect Storm

"A magnificent book ... The writing has all the nautical salt and pungency of a Patrick O'Brian novel." -- Literary Review

"A triumph... a ripping yarn founded on original research ... popular maritime history at its very best." -- Huw Bowen, Guardian

"Taylor is a great man for storms and desperate enterprises ... in this irresistible volume he demonstrates his steady scholarship too."
-- Jan Morris, The Times

A magnificent book ... has all the nautical salt and pungency of a Patrick O'Brien novel. -- Literary Review

A stunning hodge-podge of conflicts, character studies, adventures and dubious goingson in the East ... irrisistible.
-- Jan Morris, The Times

A triumph, a brilliant evocation ... this is the richest of works: a ripping yarn founded on original research. -- Guardian

An admirably well-researched and well-written account ... Taylor tells this remarkable tale with [] infectious zeal.
-- Daily Telegraph

For sheer excitement, what gripped me most is Storm and Conquest ... as thrilling as anything by Patrick O'Brien. -- Jeremy Paxman, Books of the Year, Observer

Book Description

Storm and Conquest: The Battle for the Indian Ocean, 1808-10 by Stephen Taylor is a gripping and epic account of the infamous Battle for Mauritius in which the British fleet sailed close to catastrophe in French waters.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2627 KB
  • Print Length: 420 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0571224652
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (4 Oct. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B009NRBG3Q
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 67 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #152,184 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
At the beginning of the 19th Century a significant factor in Britain's prosperity was trade with India, a country effectively ruled by a commercial enterprise, the East India Company. But that trading was a hazardous affair, beset by ferocious weather and the enmity of Napoleon's France. In Storm and Conquest, Stephen Taylor magnificently brings to life the many deprivations and disasters and the occasional ultimate rewards. As much as this is an evocation of ships and the elements, it is also a gallery of vividly drawn portraits of men and women, friend and foe, colleagues and rivals. The author's great triumph is in holding the many strands together so that the reader is always carried forward by the over-arching narrative.

The first two-thirds of the book describe the terrifying challenges faced by the Indiamen as they plied between east and west. For protection they usually - but not always - had vessels of the Royal Navy, not exactly the brotherly alliance that might have been expected. The Navy men drew a distinction between "the art of war and the art of gain" with barely disguised, but unjust, contempt for the latter. Much tension between and within the two camps derived from incompatible personalities. There were also the wives; Taylor spices his pages with some juicy scandals.

The final third deals with conquest. Two small islands in the Indian Ocean - Bourbon and Ile de France - were staging posts for French vessels that were always vigilant for the possibility of taking a passing Indiaman as a bountiful prize. The solution for Britain was to capture the two outposts. Success crowns the story but the manner of its achievement is a tragi-comedy of bloody battles mostly lost and final anti-climactic victory.
Read more ›
4 Comments 51 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought and read the book a couple of years ago, but will now buy it on Kindle as it was such an evocative account of the arduous and dangerous journey to and from India by sea in the early 1800's. As well as the military, large numbers of officials were sent out by the East India Company with their families. I have an ancestor who travelled out during this time and returned with a wife and young child. As someone who has struggled with small children on public transport the idea of months at sea with a lively toddler in the conditions described was horrendous. The ships faced the worst conditions imaginable and so many lives were lost,
As someone who hasn't read naval novels of the Napoloenic period I wasn't sure how I would get on with it. It was as easy to read as a novel and better written than many, based on meticulous but not intrusive research.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Storm and Conquest is a popular history book as gripping as many novels. It details the triumphs and tragedies of the East India Company over a couple of years in the early 19th century. The main players in India, South Africa, and sailing the Indian Ocean are brought to life through a fantastic summary based primarily on the letters, notes, analysis, and reports of those who were there.

The British Empire was in the ascendency post-Trafalgar and it was naval prowess that had brought glory to Britain. The navy was far from unrivalled though and the French fleet and the elements still brought many ships down. Taylor's book explores the people who were on board, how they related to each other, and what became of them when disaster struck.

What surprised me the most about this book is that it is first and foremost a description of the people involved. From the politicking over the governorship in India, the bitter recriminations between rivals for honour, and the love, romance, and illicit affairs that sparked, this is a tale of real human beings.

Taylor's analysis of those people is rarely of a fence-sitting variety. The exploits of Captain Corbet for instance are a remarkable read with Taylor firmly backing the sources that show Corbet to have been a monster despite the occasional success he wrought. Corbet's tale on the Nereide is probably the most heartbreaking of all and the cruelty of the life among the Indiamen and HM Navy is brought home vividly.

While the title of this book suggest an equal weight between Storm and Conquest, the former is much more of a presence. This is not really a book of battles and military action, more a tale of survival and intrigue.
Read more ›
Comment 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's a bit of a cliche, but 'Storm and Conquest' - an account of shipwrecks and naval warfare in the Indian Ocean at the time of Napoleon - really does read like a novel and a very good novel at that. Stephen Taylor captures the personalities at the heart of dramatic and, often, heart-breaking events and makes you really care about their fates.

He knows his market - there are a number of footnotes about the Patrick O'Brian novels - and, of the two distinct halves, 'Storm' is rather better than 'Conquest,' but - let's be clear - this book is a brilliant whole, linked, mostly, in the horrifying - and captivating - personality of Captain Corbet.

The highest recommendation I can give this work is that I read it pretty at much at one sitting and I have already bought two extra copies to give to friends as Christmas presents, sure in the knowledge I'm getting them something engaging, well-written and compelling.
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover