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Sticky Wickets
 
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Sticky Wickets

The Duckworth Lewis Method
1 July 2013 | Format: MP3

£4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £5.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Sŗrl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
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4:15
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3:10
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3:24
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4:23
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5:21
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 July 2013
  • Release Date: 1 July 2013
  • Label: Divine Comedy Records Limited/1969 Recor
  • Copyright: 2013 Divine Comedy Records
  • Total Length: 45:52
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00CUL7SXY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 61 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 12,424 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
After listening to my Amazon MP3s in the car for a couple of days I was going to give this a four, if only because a couple of tracks, especially the closer Nudging and Nurdling, sag a little below the standard of the rest.

But then my LP copy arrived and the fifth star was straight back in. This is a thing of real beauty - an event in the way unpacking a new album used to be. The sleeve is a proper gatefold, and there's a printed inner with another picture and all the words. And the outside shows to full advantage the little twist the back cover gives to the famous photo on the front. Best of all is the disc itself - wonderfully black, glossy and heavy, with not a trace of surface noise. It looks, feels and sounds fantastic. And (pleasant surprise after briefly havering over whether to order this or the CD) there's even a CD copy of the album inside the sleeve.

And so to the music. Well, I downloaded the digitals on Monday morning before a two-hour drive to Crawley, and I can only wonder what my fellow drivers on the M25 thought was up with me as I grinned, chortled and even at one point clapped my hands in involuntary glee. The album is full of sublimely crickety, musicky, funny moments and references, whether it's the Rolling Stonesy opener, the Beach Boys-esque Mystery Man or every 80s electronic track you ever heard rolled into Line and Length. Along the way we have The Umpire, which if anything improves on the poignancy of The Nightwatchman last time out. And, of course, we have the highest point of all, the best ELO song for 30 years: the triumphant Third Man.
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Format: MP3 Download Verified Purchase
With a cover that shows that the chap on the front can do better than Botham by getting his leg over, this CD unleashes a veritable volley of bouncers, leg breaks, beamers and the odd googly in its quest to reveal the quirks and oddities of the holy game of cricket. Beautifully observed pastiches intermingle with tales of many characters along the way in the unique Neil Hannon/Divine Comedy fashion. Even Blowers gets an inclusion and well worth it he is. If you are a cricketer, you will recognise some of the characters and smile wistfully as you join in the choruses. If you are a music lover, whilst you will miss many of the nuances you will still love the melodies, the clearness of the lyrics and the performances. Whatever the case, if you don't like this I suggest that you make an appointment to see your GP because it is clear you are very, very unwell indeed!
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By C. Porter VINE VOICE on 11 Nov. 2013
Format: Audio CD
This sequel of an album is perfect. Like Aliens was to Alien. It takes the premise of the original crickety concept album and builds on it. It feels bigger and more confident.

The same breadth of material is present - from pastiches of the Stones and ELO to 90s Europop, to the oddly affecting ballad-esque (step forward 'Out in the Middle'). Nice cameos from the ever-gorgeous Matt Berry and Stephen Fry.

But it's all about the tunesmithery and fun. And there's bucket loads of both.

Buy it, own it, absorb it. It makes your soul better, and I don't even care about cricket :)

It's cricket as a metaphor for life, all Divine Comedied-up.

Awesome - should be a 6! (rather than a 5*) - see what I did there?
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By Andy Sweeney TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 12 July 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When I reviewed The Duckworth Lewis Method's "début" album, I theorised, quite confidently, that, surely, it would be a one off. After all, how much mileage is there in a group specialising in songs about cricket? Turns out there's enough inspiration for at least two albums from The Divine Comedy's Neil Hannon and Pugwash's Thomas Walsh to indulge and fuse their love of the sport and classic pop/rock. Their new album "Sticky Wickets" (originally conceived to have an album cover lampooning The Rolling Stones' "Sticky Fingers" which would have been great) is a smashing helping of fun and, although it doesn't match up to Hannon's main body of work, it's still a thoroughly enjoyable piece of entertainment and there are a few choice tracks which make this a more than worthwhile purchase and will appeal to the vast majority of fans of both of the main players. The inclusion of Crowded House's Nick Seymour on bass as well as a plethora of special guests including Stephen Fry (on "Judd's Paradox"), Daniel Radcliffe (on "The Third Man"), Henry Blofield (on "It's Just Not Cricket"), Matt Berry (on "Mystery Man") and more famous names than you can shake a cricket bat at on "Nudging and Nurdling" make this a star-studded affair.

The first highlight is the catchy "Boom Boom Afridi" which has a chorus that sticks in your mind way after the album is over. "It's Just Not Cricket", a song about fair play, is certainly one of the best songs on the album and "The Umpire", a beautiful piece of music about the lonely world of being one of the game's law-upholders, is perhaps the most Divine Comedy-like track on this release and could easily have come from any of Neil's last few albums.
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