FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Steppenwolf has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Not an ex-library edition. Text body is clean, and free from previous owner annotation, underlining and highlighting. Binding is tight, covers and spine fully intact. Cover shows mild surface and edge wear. Page edges largely clean.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Steppenwolf Perfect Paperback – 15 Mar 2010

4.1 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Perfect Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.30
£14.30 £8.99
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£14.30 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Perfect Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Algora Publishing (15 Mar. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0875867839
  • ISBN-13: 978-0875867830
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.1 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 740,946 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Hesse was born in the German state of Württemberg. His father was born a Russian citizen in Weissenstein, Estonia; his mother spent her early years in Talatscheri, India. Both parents served as missionaries in India, and these diverse cultural currents infuse his writing with unusual flavor.


Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Steppenwolf is a novel on what it means to be alive, albeit the character of life in this book often finds itself the recipient of harsh criticism and hatred.
Hesse claimed that this work was written to portray some of the feelings of alienation and isolation that the author was feeling around the time of his fiftieth year. Despite being broken into three parts Steppenwolf essentially deals with one theme - that of the main protagonist Harry, and the struggle between his animal instincts and society.
Although Harry is somewhat alien to most of us in his utter and almost innate sadness, he does share with us a great deal. He in essence shares the struggle we all have - the one between instinct and decorum, between sensation and society. Harry is trapped because he is living as a wolf and as a man. The wolf part his base desires and the man the part of him that seeks solace in the music of Beethoven. However in reality both parts of Harry are human in nature. We all live as sensuous beings and at the same time as members of a working society, in which there are rules of conduct that will curtail the beast in us.
Steppenwolf was taken up by sixties counter-culturists as a brick to break down the walls of society around them, finding in its pages a bleak portrait of the world in which we live. The beast within lashed out, ripped the pictures from the walls and called in a new decorator! Necessary as this may have been at the time, this was not the message Hesse intended. Indeed his message was far more universal and timeless. He told us that we should enjoy the fullness of life, soak ourselves in its reveries, mine the pleasures of the intellect, but also learn how to dance and make love, to duck and dive in and out of its many forms of existence. And to do this we must not dispel the man or the beast, but we must let them lie together in an embrace, tumbling through the tides of life
Comment 34 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 29 July 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a great novel. The first third of Steppenwolf's narrative was a little heavy going, but once you get past this bit it turns into the most wonderful dream-like narrative.
The atmosphere of this book is just perfect, and the mysterious encounters of Steppenwolf and the changing shapes of his own personality are magically portrayed. As Steppenwolf explores his sense of self, the reader gets more and more drawn into his increasingly bizarre and captivating world. Steppenwolf takes the reader with him on his journey, and this is what Hesse does so well.
Although Hesse was concerned that the book might not have wide appeal, in my opinion there is something here for everyone. This is a philosophical novel and as such it doesn't have a traditional storyline. Nevertheless it is extremely engaging and really makes you think.
The only thing missing from this edition (Penguin classics) was an Editor's introduction. I wish there had been one to help explain some of the philosophical issues the novel explores, the wider historical context (as I believe this is an important part of the novel), and some background to Hesse's work. This could only have enhanced my enjoyment of this excellent novel.
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 14 April 1999
Format: Paperback
Steppenwolf, the story of a tortured outsider, has been misinterpreted by many. The problems are a relection of Hesse's own psychological crisis at the time of writing. The glorious imagery and play with notions of space, time along with the destablisation of the notion of reality make this book unique. Through a blinding, chaotic fusion of Buddhist, Jungian and Nietzschian elements a profound essay on the nature of the self is realised. A life changing, ultimately life-affirming book.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Steppenwolf is, above all, an odd book. There's more than a thread of Nietzsche running through it, and it straddles the strange line between full blown philosophy writ large in a story, and a story which relies heavily on philosophical musings. In any case, it is well wroth a read. I found perhaps the first 50 pages or so a little bit of a slog, but I feel that was less because it was dull or boring, and more because I didn't really know what the book was tying to be. After this, it cleared up a bit, and a more 'narrative' story appeared, which made the reading easier and more straightforward. I would recommend that you pick this up, if only because there's not that much quite like it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Jeremy Walton TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 14 Jan. 2015
Format: Paperback
Like, I guess, many others, this book makes me think first of the band (whose 1967 hit single I've pinched for the title of this review), but it's worth paying attention to in its own right. I first came across a reference to it many years ago in The Outsider, Colin Wilson's compelling exploration of alienation and existentialism. It inspired me to read a couple of Hesse's other works (most notably Siddhartha), but hadn't got round to this one till I picked up a copy in a second-hand shop last month.

It's a story about a middle-aged man who feels so cut off from the world of everyday people that he imagines himself divided in two: a civilized man who loves order, cleanliness, poetry and music, and a savage wolf-like being who loves darkness, lawlessness and wildness. The implications of this division, the associated internal conflict, and his spiritual crisis are worked out as he moves (or is moved) through scenes that are increasingly vivid and bizarre. Along the way, the story touches on aspects of music, war, sex and drugs (which made this a popular read for the sixties counter-culture).
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback