£130.00
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Usually dispatched within 1 to 3 months.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Follow the Author

Something went wrong. Please try your request again later.


The Stars Will Fall From Heaven: Cosmic Catastrophe and the World's End in the New Testament and Its World (The Library of New Testament Studies) Hardcover – 28 Jun 2007


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
£130.00
£104.37 £331.87
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
click to open popover

Special offers and product promotions

  • Buy this product and stream 90 days of Amazon Music Unlimited for free. E-mail after purchase. Conditions apply. Learn more

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
    Apple
  • Android
    Android
  • Windows Phone
    Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

kcpAppSendButton


Product details

  • Hardcover: 322 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury 3PL (28 Jun. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0567089126
  • ISBN-13: 978-0567089120
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 1.9 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,148,290 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?
    If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product description

Review

Review in International Review of Biblical Studies, vol. 54:2007/08

"This fine monograph by Edward Adams examines the motif of cosmic catastrophe in ancient apocalyptic literature and related writings." Library of New Testament Studies, October 2008

"This is a first-rate study" --Paul Foster "pastoral review, the "

'This is an important book on an important -- and surprisingly neglected -- subject: the cosmic catastrophe language that forms part of the New Testament's eschatology. Through a detailed and scholarly examination of the relevant texts and traditions, Jewish, Greco-Roman, and New Testament, Edward Adams argues, in critical dialogue with N.T. Wright in particular, that the New Testament writers, in varied ways, did envisage an impending destruction of the physical cosmos, followed by its re-creation. The findings and arguments of this book are significant not only for our understanding of early Christian eschatology in its historical context, but also for any attempt to use the biblical material in articulating contemporary Christian eschatology or environmental responsibility. Adams' book will be an essential point of reference for all such discussion.'--David G. Horrell, Reader in New Testament Studies, University of Exeter, UK.

"This is a first-rate study" --, "Pastoral Review, The "

"carefullly argued and meticolous survey"Journal for the study of the New Testament, 30 May 2008--,

'This is an important book on an important and surprisingly neglected subject: the cosmic catastrophe language that forms part of the New Testament's eschatology. Through a detailed and scholarly examination of the relevant texts and traditions, Jewish, Greco-Roman, and New Testament, Edward Adams argues, in critical dialogue with N.T. Wright in particular, that the New Testament writers, in varied ways, did envisage an impending destruction of the physical cosmos, followed by its re-creation. The findings and arguments of this book are significant not only for our understanding of early Christian eschatology in its historical context, but also for any attempt to use the biblical material in articulating contemporary Christian eschatology or environmental responsibility. Adams' book will be an essential point of reference for all such discussion.'--David G. Horrell, Reader in New Testament Studies, University of Exeter, UK.

"This is a first-rate study" --Paul Foster "Pastoral Review "

"This is a first-rate study" --, "Pastoral Review "

'This is an important book on an important - and surprisingly neglected - subject: the cosmic catastrophe language that forms part of the New Testament's eschatology. Through a detailed and scholarly examination of the relevant texts and traditions, Jewish, Greco-Roman, and New Testament, Edward Adams argues, in critical dialogue with N.T. Wright in particular, that the New Testament writers, in varied ways, did envisage an impending destruction of the physical cosmos, followed by its re-creation. The findings and arguments of this book are significant not only for our understanding of early Christian eschatology in its historical context, but also for any attempt to use the biblical material in articulating contemporary Christian eschatology or environmental responsibility. Adams' book will be an essential point of reference for all such discussion.'--Sanford Lakoff

Synopsis

The aim of this book is to establish and explore New Testament belief in the end of the world through an investigation of texts which - on the face of it - contain 'end of the world' language. It engages with recent discussion on how Jewish and early Christian 'end of the world' was meant to be understood, and interacts especially with N.T. Wright's proposals. The first part of the book is given over to background and focuses on the Old Testament, Jewish apocalyptic and related literature and Graeco-Roman sources. The latter have seldom been brought into play in previous discussion. The author shows that the Stoic material is especially relevant. The second part of the book concentrates on the New Testament evidence and explores in detail all the key texts. The pertinent texts are analyzed in terms of the kind of the 'end of the world' language they use - language of cosmic cessation, of catastrophe and conflagration.

The main aim of the exegesis is to establish the extent to which the language is meant objectively, but there is further exploration of issues arising from the notions of the end of the world where they are deemed to be present, including whether the idea of the world's dissolution implies a rejection of the created order. The conclusion explores the implications of the theme of the end of the world for Christian theology and ethics, and discusses especially, the ramifications for environmental ethics.

See all Product description

No customer reviews


Review this product

Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews on Amazon.com

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews
Slim
5.0 out of 5 starsWonderful
17 March 2011 - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
2 people found this helpful.
Gustavo Martin
5.0 out of 5 starsSolid and groundbreaking
12 February 2009 - Published on Amazon.com
8 people found this helpful.
Book Guy
5.0 out of 5 starsExcellent
29 August 2009 - Published on Amazon.com
3 people found this helpful.
S. Carr
5.0 out of 5 starsExcellent review of apocalyptic literature
29 June 2008 - Published on Amazon.com
3 people found this helpful.