£8.99
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Star of Bethlehem: A ... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Star of Bethlehem: A Skeptical View Paperback – 9 Sep 2013

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£8.49 £13.59
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Onus Books (9 Sept. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0956694861
  • ISBN-13: 978-0956694867
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 564,694 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Author of Secrets of the Night Sky and Discover magazine's "Sky Lights" column, Bob Berman is the director of the Overlook and Cobb-Matthieson Observatories and lives near Woodstock, New York.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Adair should be the go-to guy on things concerning the Star of Bethlehem. A super book chock full of interesting facts and nuggets. Great stuff. The literal understandings of the nativity accounts are seriously debunked with thee help of this easily digestible number.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Highly recommended! This book could stimulate an interest in astronomy.
Reading through the spectrum of possibilities makes the Bible tale more interesting.
How could you follow a star to a house in Bethlehem ?

There is a free planetarium program on the internet @ stellarium org
It is easy to download. Select the viewing location as Jerusalem, switch off the atmosphere, put to play fast forward and watch the constellations crossing the sky. Place the cursor over one point in the sky to represent a geostationary star like light. Wouldn't real Magi have said that the star appeared to cross several constellations each night? Job 9v9 mentions the constellations of Orion, Pleiades & Ursa Major, Wouldn't the author of the gospel attributed to Matthew have mentioned whether the bright light appeared to pass above or below the constellation of Orion?
If planet means wandering star then why not say there was a bright light in the sky which was brighter than any planet and also appeared to move across the constellations more rapidly than any planet. Why not say the bright light moved around in the sky unlike any other known astronomical thing. Why call the light a star if it wasn't a star ?

With Stellarium it is also possible to set the viewing location as another planet.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback