Buy Used
£2.66
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Stanley I Presume? Hardcover – 19 Mar 2009

4.3 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£18.22 £0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:

Stanley I Presume?
£10.99
(15)
In stock.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Fourth Estate; First Edition, First Printing edition (19 Mar. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 000729672X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007296729
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 766,235 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

“A hilarious memoir” - THE SUNDAY TIMES

***** (FIVE STARS) "Laugh out loud funny - once you've read it you'll understand a lot more about what makes Boris tick" - NEWS OF THE WORLD

**** (FOUR STARS) "This is a very funny book - Stanley devotes most of his autobiography to telling jokes at his own expense" - THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

“A wonderful jaw-dropping account of a rollercoaster life. Johnson senior does not disappoint… the book is a triumph” - ANNE ROBINSON

"Poet, explorer, irresistibly funny…. This lovely book reflects its author's delightful personality" - ESTHER RANTZEN

“There’s no-one I’d rather go into the jungle with” - JOAN BAKEWELL

“From the early days of running across a mat of spring flowers at the stadium at Olympia, to a standing ovation at the Berlin Film Festival, via the politics and people of his time, Stanley Johnson's life sparkles with a joy of living. He writes with the wit and humour of a true raconteur. Stanley, I Presume, is a fascinating read of a fascinating life” - ZOE WANAMAKER

'a rip-roaring read!' Boris Johnson, Telegraph, Books of the Year

Review

A hilarious memoir

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
If you buy only one autobiography this year, make sure it is Stanley I Presume?. Stanley Johnson's zest for life comes through on every page. This book is full of the best kind of self-deprecating humour, in utter contrast to most modern autobiographies which big up the author at the expense of everyone else. Stanley Johnson treats all the people that he has come across in his rich life with courtesy and affection, and his jokes entertain refreshingly at his own expense.

But there is more to the book than just humour. In an easy undidactic way, important beliefs come clear, especially about the urgent need to protect the planet and to conserve the things that are good about life. It is interesting how the autobiography shows that these values are rooted in the Johnson family farm deep in Exmoor, the place that always draws Stanley back from whichever exotic corner of the globe his travels have taken him to.

I felt better for reading this book!
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The author had the good luck to be born in a Year of the Dragon - on 18 August 1940. It shows. He has the dragon's typical exuberance, need for a healthy environment (in his case Exmoor) and love of family. Apart from forward glimpses to the careers of his six dragonets, this account mostly covers the period up to 12 November 1980, when Jean-Paul II firmly (if prematurely) gave a papal blessing to Mrs Johnson II.

That is one of many anecdotes made all the better for how they are told. There's a classical grammarian's relish in building to the punch line of an exchange in a "proper" Bombay cobbler's (page 147). But there is also an attractively gentle wit, especially when writing about his father, who (he speculates) might have developed "the technique of the inaudible response" when dealing with questions at school about his own Turkish father and his non-appearance at school sports days. A poem on his father's death is very moving.

The title is cunning. It alludes to a famous anecdote and yet by modifying the phrasing of both that and his own story about an African safari in 1976, he bats away any suggestion of self-importance. By inviting this Stanley home, you will meet the perfect houseguest, who brings everyone into the conversation and never presumes to outstay his welcome.

To the publishers: why no index? The vignettes of public figures, messages on over-population and insights into UN and EU bureaucracies deserve one. To the author: please persuade your wife that in twenty years or so you can provide your readers with a second helping, while still respecting her privacy.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Stanley is hopefully the last of the dying breed of overconfident men schooled in the english public school system, how he recalls all the minutiae of life at school is beyond me, he glides through Oxbridge and always seems to know of someone through a relative who can assist him, no real career, but a jolly good chap who gets involved in big causes of the world, carry on up the Amazon Stanley but your book is lite autobiography and not insightful, sorry
1 Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have to confess that I thought this would be a case of Stanley Johnson getting on the bandwagon by taking advantage of his son's reputation and fame. I was wrong! I found this book an eye-opener! I had no idea of the background of Boris, - his father's life was so amazing and adventurous and one realizes why Boris is like he is! What a life! What a family! Interesting, exciting, and eye-opener! I could not put it down and loved it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Stanley writes in an easy to read and thoroughly engaging style. This autobiography goes up to his 40th year.

Stanley, father of London Mayor, Boris, describes his population control initiative and `Pills Grim Progress', his poetry success, solace he found in pollution control, the briefcase he lost off a landrover - in a desert - containing family passports and flight tickets, that was later found and handed to him with the words: "Stanley, I presume?", and many perfectly true and amazing stories from deep and darkest Devon.

This autobiography goes back to Boris's grandfather, greatgrandfather and King George II.

Stanley *you rock* and now all we need is to read your sequel for 40 years + ...
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book. I always imagined the Stanley Johnson would be a bit like Joe Kennedy, a powerful figure who want his children to move into powerful positions, and that it would be done any cost, I don't think Stanley Johnson is like that. Like his son Alexander, Boris, as constantly refers to him in the book, Stanley Johnson is a clever man both intellectually and culturally. He plays this aspect of his life down to a large degree. He has probably been a lucky man being in the right place at the right time, and the statement 'its not what you know, but who you know' seems a very appropriate saying, as many times he mentions someone he knew at Sherborne or Oxford, and his family tree seems quite impressive there must be some useful connections there. The book deals with the first forty years of Stanley's life, and it flows well without becoming bogged down in trivia or complex details. Looking at the photographs in the book at times you do struggle to tell the difference between Stanley and Boris. A very good and entertaining read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback