Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Stanley Bate - Piano Concerto No.2 & Sinfonietta No.1 / Franz Reizenstein - Piano Concerto No.2 Classical

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, Classical
"Please retry"
Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?


Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Classical
  • Label: Dutton Epoch
  • ASIN: B005SE15OI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 353,532 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

The public response to Dutton Epoch's exploration of the orchestral music of Stanley Bate has been very positive, and there will surely be new enthusiasts for this fourth volume, which features the Second Piano Concerto and the first Sinfonietta, coupled with another Dutton Epoch discovery, the music of Franz Reizenstein whose Second Piano Concerto is grippingly played by Victor Sangiorgio. Here Dutton Epoch celebrates the centenary of the birth of both composers: Bate born in Plymouth, Reizenstein in Nuremberg (and coming to the UK in 1934). Stanley Bate's scores date from 1938 and 1940, and his Concerto is characterised by its relentless energy and onward drive. Bate was a man who readily absorbed what was new, and if we sense the occasional flavour of Hindemith and the Shostakovich First Piano Concerto (complete with obbligato trumpet in the finale) in the fast music, and the lyricism of Poulenc in the slow movement, we also quickly recognise the ebullient voice of Bate himself in two scores that just precede his celebrated Third Symphony. The Finale of the Concerto is a tour de force of exhilarating, headlong passagework and catchy tunes and motifs. Franz Reizenstein was one of the many composers and musicians who were forced to leave Germany when the Nazis came to power. Reizenstein wrote in all forms, with much piano music and chamber music. The Second Piano Concerto, perhaps briefly his most popular orchestral work, was first performed by the composer at a BBC broadcast concert from Maida Vale on 7 June 1961. Published in 1962, it was seen as an approachable modern work, and indeed pianist Victor Sangiorgio brings a romantic sweep to his performance, which is surely what the composer intended. World premiere recordings. Track listing: Franz Reizenstein: Piano Concerto No.2 in F (1961); Stanley Bate: Piano Concerto No.2 in C major, Op.28 (1940); Sinfonietta No.1, Op.22 (1938)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Verified Purchase
Franz Reizenstein (1911-68) was of German origin, but fled his homeland shortly after the Nazis came to power and settled in England. Although he spent some time at the RCM, studying under Vaughan Williams, his Piano Concerto No.2 is a full-blooded European affair, with shades of Hindemith, his composition teacher in Germany. This work, which he wrote for himself to perform, requires formidable technique, and there is little respite for the soloist. The piano is at times treated in the grand manner, and at times in a manner designed to showcase the pianist's dexterity.

After the dynamic first movement with its breathless solo passages, the second is a more restrained affair, although even here the piano threatens to break free at times, the orchestra seeming to keep the soloist's feet on the ground. The finale returns to the dynamic mood - as well as to some of the thematic material - of the first movement. The main cadenza of the concerto, which makes great demands on the soloist, comes after a powerful orchestral climax, and is followed by a race between piano and orchestra for the finishing line.

Dutton have already championed a number of Stanley Bate's major works (Third and Fourth Symphonies, Viola Concerto), and the Piano Concerto No.2 is presented here. Written in 1940, it has much of the energy and dynamism found in the Reizenstein, especially in the outer movements, though here the influence is Shostakovich rather than Hindemith. The first movement begins with a breezy theme in the orchestra, with buoyant piano passagework superimposed upon it. The orchestra drives the movement rhythmically, while the piano makes much use of running semiquavers.
Read more ›
2 Comments 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
I'd never heard of Stanley Bate before hearing an extract of this concerto on Radio 3, but I was so impressed that I ordered it straightaway. Very derivative but exciting and exuberant outer movements with a haunting lyrical slow movement.. Will now hunt out other music by him. A very interesting discovery.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Look for similar items by category