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Stand Gold CD

4.5 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (16 Feb. 1995)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Gold CD
  • Label: Sony
  • ASIN: B00000DSM1
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 971,721 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
By the tail-end of the Sixties, Sly and The Family Stone were riding about as high as anybody could. The group topped the American pop charts (no mean feat), performed for many the show stealing performance at Woodstock and were continually lauded for their grounbreaking synthesis of Soul/Funk and Rock, releasing songs that were irresistably catchy, lyrically savvy and dancable. For whatever reason, though, the Family Stone (especially in Britain) are a footnote in many people's musical history, whereas they should have chapters dedicated to them straight after Elvis, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. Their music is rich, deep and complex and I don't think any other album by the band depicts the truth of this more immediately than 'Stand'.
Right from the off we are assaulted with this wonderful combination of soul, funk, pop, rock, etc not coming at us seperately or diversely, but all at once in that blended way that the best and most inventive bands offer. Just Listen. 'Everyday People' is still one of the freshest sounding, upbeat, cheerful songs ever recorded. It bounces along in a spirit of optimism and the chorus hits us like a blast of sunshine. 'Stand' is also imbued with a sense of positivity before morphing into a funk-fest during the coda. 'Don't Call, Me N****r, Whitey' is a brutally funky, lyrically inventive song that looked at things from both sides of the racial divide. It would have acted as a real musical jolt at the time and is still surprising today. The band can hit hard ('Sing A Simple Song'), do playful sounding (albeit lyrically sinister) pop, ('Somebody's Watching You') and build a groove so relentless that you won't even notice until your trance breaks ('I Wanna Take you Higher').
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Format: Audio CD
"Stand" was the fourth album recorded by Sly and the Family Stone for CBS Records. "Sly and the Family Stone," were one of the best, and most innovative bands of the late 1960's and early 70's, pioneering a funky psychedelic soulful kind of rock that was widely influential, and would ultimately help create disco. They had five American Top Ten hits, and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993.

Sly Stone, born Sylvester Stewart to a church-going family in Denton, TX, had already achieved some local fame in San Francisco, California, as a radio disk jockey/musician/producer, when he was "discovered" by CBS Records' great president/talent scout Clive Davis. Davis signed Sly to CBS's subsidiary Epic Records; the label that recorded and released all his greatest songs. Anyway, it took them a couple of tries, but their fourth album, "Stand!" was the breakout hit, selling more than three million copies, and introducing us to "Everyday People." You'll find that song, and many of the group's other hit singles here, including, of course, "Stand!" Also "I Want to Take You Higher," "You Can Make it If You Try," and "Sing a Simple Song."

The group played Woodstock that famed three-day concert fest, in upstate New York in 1969, and had a great triumph there. But as the innocent, feel good, do good 60's turned into the harsher, more self-centered 70's, Sly came under great pressures, from his record company to produce more, and from the Black Panther Party, and other extremist black organizations, to produce more militant music. Unfortunately, he reacted by falling into drug problems, and reclusiveness.
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By A Customer on 4 Jan. 2003
Format: Audio CD
this album really is an amazing album. it has a quality which liberates the mind from the drudgery of everyday life and shows us what life should be about. all the songs are great from the long but humourus jam of "sex machine" to the angry scream of "don't call me nigger, whitey". the lyrics are also worth a mention on this album; "everyday people" and "stand" both contain really great and memorable lines that leave a lasting impression. however, all this aside, "i wanna take you higher" is the song that makes this album a masterpiece. it drives with such a force that it causes you to forget the troubles of your day and instead live the ecstacy within the music. the song is a five minute anthem of pure gospel/funk/rock. it will have you dancing like a fool while you clap and sing. this album should be bought for "i wanna take you higher," alone.
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Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
okay okay I know I'm out of line but when this record is great it's great...it's just that some of it just passes me over and becomes a bit of a chore to listen to'''hey it's only my opinion, horses for courses and all that!
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Format: Audio CD
Utterly brilliant album, which i only discovered after seeing it (in The Rough Guide To Rock) recommended as being in the must-have category. And it surely is. Heavily funky, psychedelic cross-over music. Fortunately, there are a couple of lighter numbers on the album. You need them, just so as to be able to take a breather from the serious stuff.

The absolute highlight, for me, is the outrageously funky "I Want To Take You Higher". (A much "chunkier" mix from the one on my quadrophonic "Sly and the Family Sone: Greatest Hits" LP.) Plenty of other tremendous tracks, like "Don't Call Me Nigger, Whitey", the brilliant "Sing A Simple Song" and "Sex Machine". The last is a quite fabulous jam, which you won't find anywhere else(?). Too long to feature on any compilation, but one of this landmark album's key moments. As Sly says, this will "blow your mind".

This new digipack Legacy issue, with bonus tracks, sounds absolutely wonderful. The instrumentation seems to have benefitted from a freshening up. And the enhanced booklet makes for a very pleasing package. (Apologies if you think i've overdone the superlatives, but this album really is that good. If you are unfamiliar, get it into your life!)
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