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Comment: This is an ex-library book and may have the usual library/used-book markings inside.This book has hardback covers. In good all round condition. Dust Jacket in fair condition.
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St. Pancras Station Hardcover – 1 Nov 1968

5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 1 Nov 1968
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 120 pages
  • Publisher: Allen & Unwin; 1st edition (Nov. 1968)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 004385043X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0043850435
  • Product Dimensions: 24.4 x 17.8 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 413,796 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
If "architecture is frozen music" [Goethe] then the magnificent St Pancras buildings must constitute one of J.S.Bach’s major concertos.
This is a book for anyone with an interest in world-class architecture, or history, or great engineering. It’s probably quite interesting to railway enthusiasts too!
St. Pancras station and its Midland Grand Hotel manage to combine high art and design with a masterpiece of engineering in an incredible, exuberant, completely 'over-the-top' statement of Victorian company confidence. The book explains in an intelligent and entertaining way, why and how it was achieved by the brilliantly innovative engineer William Henry Barlow, and the eminent and sometimes insensitive architect Sir George Gilbert Scott.
"If the Directors and officers of the Midland company had pooled their collective experience with a view to securing a site for their London station that would combine the greatest possible number of difficulties, they could hardly have fixed on anything better than the one they chose at St. Pancras. It was occupied by a canal, a gas-works, an ancient church with a large and crowded graveyard, and some of the most atrocious slums in London; and through it all ran the Fleet River."
Sir John Betjeman reviewed the original, 1968, edition of this book as "readable, learned, and inspiring". More recently, the author and presenter Dan Cruickshank referred to it in his "Story of Britain’s Best Buildings" (BBC Books) as "perceptive".
This new edition is revised and enhanced with interesting new photographs and plans, and an additional chapter by architectural historian Robert Thorne about the revival of St. Pancras. The changes somehow manage to make the book better-balanced than the original.
A classic book about a classic building.
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By cairns TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 7 Jun. 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A superb book giving us the complete history of St Pancras station from it's inception, and with an additional paragraph, bringing us up to the refurbishment,until 2003. The comprehensive facts are very well researched and presented in an easily assimilated manner. There are very good relevant photo's and plans all which add to the very well researched text. It is said that this book played a major part in the movement to preseve the Station when things looked very bleak for it's future. It is not just a book for the Railway or Architecture enthusiast, but anyone who has any interest in their surroundings. It also shows us how close we came to losing what is an integral part of our modern transport infrastructure. This was very close to being a book about something destroyed and replaced. Please read it .
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Exactly as described and prompt delivery thank you !!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Story of a Masterpiece of Architecture and Engineering 18 Mar. 2004
By Nigel Lowey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
If "architecture is frozen music" [Goethe] then the magnificent St Pancras buildings must constitute one of J.S.Bach's major concertos.
This is a book for anyone with an interest in world-class architecture, or history, or great engineering. It's probably quite interesting to railway enthusiasts too!
St. Pancras station and its Midland Grand Hotel manage to combine high art and design with a masterpiece of engineering in an incredible, exuberant, completely 'over-the-top' statement of Victorian company confidence. The book explains in an intelligent and entertaining way, why and how it was achieved by the brilliantly innovative engineer William Henry Barlow, and the eminent and sometimes insensitive architect Sir George Gilbert Scott.
"If the Directors and officers of the Midland company had pooled their collective experience with a view to securing a site for their London station that would combine the greatest possible number of difficulties, they could hardly have fixed on anything better than the one they chose at St. Pancras. It was occupied by a canal, a gas-works, an ancient church with a large and crowded graveyard, and some of the most atrocious slums in London; and through it all ran the Fleet River."
Sir John Betjeman reviewed the original, 1968, edition of this book as "readable, learned, and inspiring". More recently, the author and presenter Dan Cruickshank referred to it in his "Story of Britain's Best Buildings" (BBC Books) as "perceptive".
This new edition is revised and enhanced with interesting new photographs and plans, and an additional chapter by architectural historian Robert Thorne about the revival of St. Pancras. The changes somehow manage to make the book better-balanced than the original.
A classic book about a classic building.
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