£31.95 + £1.26 UK delivery
Only 1 left in stock. Sold by EliteDigital UK

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Spyglass Guest

4.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

Price: £31.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by EliteDigital UK.
2 new from £13.99 6 used from £4.99
£31.95 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by EliteDigital UK.

Amazon's Greenslade Store


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Product details

  • Audio CD (1 April 1996)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner
  • ASIN: B000024DBX
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 355,533 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I remember seeing this band years and years ago. After the concert I told my mate that the gig had blown my mind and have felt a prat for saying it ever since. It was just that the keyboard playing was so highly charged that it just went in through every pore. This is the only Greenslade album that I ever actually purchased and probably not really for mainstream tastes (but is still superb and evokes great mental pictures of that memorable night). Of their albums I would recommend this as a good sampler. If you like the early 70's synth sounds and not too worried about some cheesey lyrics give it a go.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
While I love much of Greenslade's work, this is not the best example of it. Sure, the components are there in abundance - heavily synth-orientated prog rock with gruff vocals and often delicate melodies - but there are no obviously stand-out tracks that adhere to your memory, as on Bedside Manners, Time & Tide etc. Slightly anonymous, but a worthy addition to the collection for a completist!
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This was my first and only Greenslade LP in the 70's, and I played it a lot for a relative short period of time. Then I kind of forgot about it (and Greenslade), and then I sold my LP's in the early 80's.

10 years ago I bought their first effort "Greenslade", and their second "Bedside manners are extra", which are both great. It probably has a lot to do with nostalgia, but "Spyglass Guest" is not just great. It's magic, (wo)man! Beauty is in the ears of the beholder, sure, and I sure love my ears tonight.

I (a 50 year old/young human beeing) got home from work today, and there it was in my mailbox: "Spyglass Guest". I had totally forgotten about it, and I thought (without much ethusiasm in my head): "Oh, that one... ok..." I made, and ate, some dinner, and kind of forgot about it...

Half an hour went by, and then memory rose to the surface, and the rest goes like this: Damn! Music playing with my ears (and mind) in such a way is unheard of (sic)! No plans for red wine tonight, but who can resist it? Not MY ears mouth, anyway...

The joyious melancolic jazz-prog-melody-beauty in crystal clear sound... Instruments Truly Playing with Each Other, giving Room, giving Space... all balanced, and held together, by the Great, Punchy Drumming and the Steely Dan-like Vocals...

Cheers!
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
In my opinion the mellow, melodic 'Spyglass Guest' is Greenslade's best album. It's still prog, but songs like 'Rainbow' and 'Little Red Fry-up' are self contained musical vignettes. Unusually for a prog band Greenslade's lyrics touched upon some darkly adult themes. Here the protagonist of 'Red Light' discovers his girlfriend is a prostitute, but seeks to continue the relationship. The song also features a great vocal performance from Dave Lawson, another one of rock's underrated singers. Throw in a couple of captivating instrumentals 'Siam See-saw' and 'Melancholic Race' and you've got a sophisticated mid 70's prog album.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars 8 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars best one 5 Feb. 2008
By znodog - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is absolutely the best Greenslade, its got all the great elements of the previous 2, but its a lot more adventurous with its very special guest list and additional instrumentation. Lawson's playing and singing never sounded better, and the crispy drumming and burning keyboard work of the opening tune sets the mood for a great listen. I waited for a long time to find this on cd, People have been trying to sell this between 44.00 and 123.00, I couldnt believe it when I found a seller that sold it to me for 15.00, I still have a grin on my face..If you have Greenslade, Bedside Manners Are Extra, then you need Spyglass Guest. Also try and find Time And Tide.Beautiful, fun and timeless...and get it while its available!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is by far my favorite Greenslade album! 4 Mar. 2011
By BENJAMIN MILER - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Greenslade were never a big time act, you know they'll never make the big time like Yes or Genesis, but they made four worthy albums. I really think 1974's Spyglass Guest was their best album, despite a weak cover of Jack Bruce's "Theme for an Imaginary Western". The music is more polished, Dave Lawson's voice seems easier for me to take in, and the album contains some of the finest music Greenslade ever made. Unfortunately the album started showing schisms between Dave Greenslade and Dave Lawson, as many of the cuts they don't even play together. It's probably the reason Tony Reeves left the band after this album. The music tends to have a bit of a jazzier feel, in that electric piano tends to dominate more, luckily Dave Greenslade's organ and Mellotron are still used. The album even gets outside help from Dave "Clem" Clempson, ex-Colosseum and then Peter Frampton's replacement in Humble Pie, and String Driven Thing and future Van der Graaf (without Generator) violinst Graham Smith.

The album was released on Warner Bros. in the UK as was all their albums there. While Bedside Manners are Extra never received a US release, Spyglass Guest (as well as their final album, Time and Tide) was released on Mercury here. In Italy, the album was released on Vertigo, strangely on the swirl label, which was put out of commission in the UK in 1973, but still was used in Italy as late as 1976.

"Spirit of the Dance" is in familiar Greenslade territory, lots of nice organ and Mellotron, plus great synths. I really get a kick off "Little Red Fry Up", here the band is showing their humorous side, something usually absent on a Greenslade album. "Rainbow" is a slower piece, but I found it a rather stunning piece. I really love that synth solo found on "Siam Seesaw". "Red Light" is a ballad from Dave Lawson, while "Melancholic Race" features a passage where they actually go into fusion territory. It's agreed almost to a man that their cover of "Theme for an Imaginary Western" is weak, but I guess it's simply Dave Greenslade digging up his Colosseum past as Colosseum included a cover of it on their 1970 album Daughter of Time (Tony Reeves was no longer with Colosseum when they recorded Daughter of Time). Mountain also did a cover of it on their Climbing (1970) album that featured the big hit "Mississippi Queen", and it's agreed that Mountain did a much better version of it.

Greenslade is often underrated, since many will have trouble with Dave Greenslade's keyboard playing or Dave Lawson's singing, but they made some worthy albums, but of all four they did, this is by far my favorite and I highly recommend it, if you like their style, that is.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What happened to Roger Dean? 29 May 2007
By Michael Redmond - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Firstly, I think you can ignore the previous reviewer's comments about Lawson's vocals. They are an acquired taste and a part of the Greenslade sound (see my other review on "Bedside Manners...." for a more in-depth discussion on this). Secondly, some people may think it irrelevant but for us visual people, the cover is missing a Roger Dean masterpiece. I think they should have forced Roger to do all Prog covers. Anyway, a Roger Dean cover for this album is sorely missed after the first two fine covers. Is it a little thing? Well, it seems to set the tone for the whole album. Greenslade started as an unusual band with 2 keyboard players, no guitarists and beautiful Roger Dean covers which seemed to capsulize their unique sound. Now, suddenly we find guitar solos on some of the tracks. The electric guitar is an instrument that is very upfront, and it immediately comes to the forefront instead of blending with the other instruments. I love the guitar sound but here I find it annoying. It is an unnecessary extra over the top of nice keyboard work. This album is so mixed, that it seems they didn't quite know which direction they wanted to go in. It truly sounds like some of the songs were left-over songs that didn't fit into earlier albums. But this album also contains some very good Greenslade tracks. The album isn't bad as such, it just isn't very cohesive, and as Prog lovers, if an album isn't a concept album, it can at least sound like the tracks belong together. If this doesn't bother you very much, then it's no risk to purchase this album, the songs are good but not great, yet many reviewers think Greenslade isn't great in the first place. They have always been a second tier band. Some say, they could have done some dueling virtuoso keyboard work having two players, but they don't. I think Dave is an excellent musician and can play like a virtuoso but chooses not to (most of the time), and likes to create smoother sounds. I prefer that myself.

There is violin on "Joie de Vivre", the most progressive track, and it meshes in much more nicely with the keyboards. We find, I think, attempted humor on "Little red fry up", and yet another, "turn on the red light" song, with "Red Light". Even though this song was written before The Police song "Roxanne", I can't help to recall the Police song every time I hear it. So, in the end, to me this album seems all over the place. Also, we see an attempt to make shorter songs, which makes me wonder, were they trying to be more popular with all these changes? Trying to shed the Prog image? Probably, but if that is the case, then the " Time & Tide" album did it much better. That album does in fact sound cohesive and more main-stream. Getting back to the cover art. I remember as a teenager purposely skipping this album because of the ugly cover, and went straight to Time & Tide because it was more Roger Dean like. I didn't hear this album until recently because I wanted to complete the Greenslade collection. I don't think my criticisms are major, so I still give Spyglass Guest 4 stars. Being popular was never what Prog was about, so even though Greenslade are relatively unknown, they are still a fine addition to any symphonic Prog collection. It is getting hard to find in 2007, try GEMM or eBay. Greenslade fans should also try Fruupp.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rock solid! 3 Jun. 2010
By Musick - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This was my first and only Greenslade LP in the 70's, and I played it a lot for a relative short period of time. Then I kind of forgot about it (and Greenslade), and then I sold my LP's in the early 80's.

10 years ago I bought their first effort "Greenslade", and their second "Bedside manners are extra", which are both great. It probably has a lot to do with nostalgia, but "Spyglass Guest" is not just great. It's magic, (wo)man! Beauty is in the ears of the beholder, sure, and I sure love my ears tonight.

I (a 50 year old/young human beeing) got home from work today, and there it was in my mailbox: "Spyglass Guest". I had totally forgotten about it, and I thought (without much ethusiasm in my head): "Oh, that one... ok..." I made, and ate, some dinner, and kind of forgot about it...

Half an hour went by, and then memory rose to the surface, and the rest goes like this: Damn! Music playing with my ears (and mind) in such a way is unheard of (sic)! No plans for red wine tonight, but who can resist it? Not MY ears mouth, anyway...

This joyious-melancolic-jazz-prog-melody-beauty in crystal clear sound... Instruments Truly Playing with Each Other, giving Room, giving Space... all balanced, and held together, by the Great, Punchy Drumming and the Ugly-Beautiful Vocals...

Well... Cheers!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spyglass Guest, best of Progressive Rock 7 April 2011
By Proge Man - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Imaginative, varying, playful, enjoyable, entertaining! I just love it! I first recorded this album in the seventies and I fell in love with it right away. And it is not boring me after all these decades! That's what good music is like.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback