FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Spitting Blood: The histo... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by FT Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: We are certain you will be delighted with our high level of customer service. all our books are in 'Good' or better condition and we ship daily from our UK warehouse.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Spitting Blood: The history of tuberculosis Hardcover – 22 Nov 2012

3.9 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£16.99
£13.97 £0.09
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£16.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Spitting Blood: The history of tuberculosis
  • +
  • Tuberculosis: The Greatest Story Never Told - The Search for the Cure and the New Global Threat
Total price: £33.98
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 1 edition (22 Nov. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199542058
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199542055
  • Product Dimensions: 20.1 x 3.3 x 13.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 90,455 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Helen Bynum has written a book not only full of diverting asides but also of urgent importance. (Richard Horton, Guardian)

Highly recommended. (M.L. Charleroy, CHOICE)

About the Author

Helen Bynum is a freelance historian and author of Tropical Medicine in the 20th Century. Together with William Bynum, she edited Great Discoveries in Medicine and the award winning Dictionary of Medical Biography (5 vols.).


Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The most accessible part of this book is the first part which describes the slow, painful and brave death of George Orwell to TB. The author died just as streptomycin was being developed but the anti-biotic which saved millions did not work for the great British writer. After that touching opening episode, "Spitting Blood" combines fascinating facts with a dull and often confusing delivery. So, if you persevere, you will discover that quacks dominated the diagnosis and treatment of TB for most of our history until huge strides were made after the French physician Rene Laennec invented the stethoscope (useful for "hearing" cavities in the lungs) nearly 200 years ago. The odd person had made pertinent contributions before - such as the Italian Girolamo Fracastro 500 years ago whose ideas were dismissed and largely forgotten for centuries. In the last century a few individuals made huge differences in the recognition and treatment of TB - including the man who set up the specialist TB centre in Edinburgh and the New York authorities who researched the problem, discovering that the Irish immigrants were three times as likely to die from TB as Polish Jew emigres. Then, when the world's scientists realised that they could develop vaccines and other treatments, huge investments were made to reduce the spread and potency of the disease.
Along the way, however, TB was used in racist ways by the SS and by organisations including the Newark-based Prudential Insurance Company which all but gave up insuring blacks as they were seen as posing far higher TB mortality risks. Of course, the book raises many questions about where we go from here, now that TB is being diagnosed in Britain again and as we battle against other bacteria that seem to defy standard treatment by anti-biotics.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Comprehensive and scholarly account of TB through the ages illustrated with cases histories. Progress of treatment complicated by politics.

David Thomas
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Before it became known as tuberculosis, consumption was seen as a romantic disease with Chopin, Keats, the Bronte sisters and many others dying from it. Their lingering deaths, supposedly responsible for their creativity, were however, extremely unpleasant. Helen Bynum’s marvellous book describes the history of the disease, the attempted cures in expensive sanatoria and the identification of the bacillus that causes TB. Preventative measures such as vaccination of children, mass X-rays to discover people who might have the disease, and an array of drugs all brought down the incidence of the disease and the World became complacent. Having bottomed out, however, the disease is once again spreading and becoming a major killer. This is partly because of the weakening effects on infected people of HIV/Aids and partly because of growing resistance to the previously effective drugs. Helen Bynum describes the controversies, the successes and the failures in curbing TB with compassion and attention to the fascinating detail. A superb book about an important aspect of the history of medicine.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good, but could have spent more time and thought on rising incidence of drug resistant strains.
I believe the correct term is NOT 'TB' but 'tubercle', as told me by a specialist from before days of streptomycin.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback