£14.93 + £1.26 UK delivery
Only 1 left in stock - order soon. Sold by Founders Factory JPN4UK
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by TOMMY's STORE
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: All of our products are Japanese import and are Japanese editions. We are unable to confirm or guarantee the availability of special accessories and bonus items, including OBIs, photocards, posters and a box for CD/DVD set, for pre-owned products. We guarantee careful packing and safe shipping. usually delivered in 10-20 business days after shipment.Shipment within 4 business days. if you have any questions, please let us know. Thank you so much!
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£15.70
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: samurai media
Add to Basket
£15.94
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: Arc Trade Media_JAPAN
Add to Basket
£18.04
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: Japan-Select
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £3.99

Speak No Evil Import

4.8 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

Price: £14.93
Only 1 left in stock - order soon.
Dispatched from and sold by Founders Factory JPN4UK.
6 new from £14.93 9 used from £9.35
£14.93 Only 1 left in stock - order soon. Dispatched from and sold by Founders Factory JPN4UK.

Amazon's Wayne Shorter Store


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Speak No Evil
  • +
  • Maiden Voyage
Total price: £18.92
Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Audio CD (6 Jan. 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Emi Japan/Zoom
  • ASIN: B00269X4QK
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,794,772 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
'Speak No Evil' was produced during one of the most innovative eras of jazz music, the early to mid-60's. 1964 was also the year John Coltrane produced 'A Love Supreme' and Eric Dolphy 'Out To Lunch'. Wayne Shorter managed to assemble some of the best players of that age to produce another jazz masterpiece. Ron Carter from Miles Davis's group, as well as Herbie Hancock on an upward slope to greatness. Elvin Jones fresh from his playing on 'A Love Supreme' and Freddie Hubbard who we heard on 'Out To Lunch' earlier in the year.
Shorter had been playing with Coltrane in the late 50's but his style ended up more melodic as can be heard on the opener 'Witch Hunt', which sounds like the basis of his work with Weather Report in the 70's. Hubbard plays an ode to the past as Hancock arrives with a mellow swing. By the end of the track Shorter and Hubbard are beginning to sound like a full orchestra. 'Fe-Fi-Fo-Fum' has all the smokey charm of a bluesy barroom band much like Hancock's piano on 'Dance Cadaverous'. A track with a smouldering melody, Hubbard and Shorter play in unison, each with an ear for it's seemingly spontaneous development as it builds to a mid-track crescendo. On the title track itself, Hancock's playing is infectious and infused with feeling. Jones lets loose on Shorter's first solo before Hubbard takes over with his energetic and melodic playing. More beautiful and airy sax on 'Infant Eyes' before we get Shorter's introverted solo on 'Wild Flower' followed by Hubbard's loud and engaging one. Hancock is again amazing against Jones's drumming.
Shorter was extraordinarily lucky to have these players at the peak of their powers.
Comment 45 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
On Speak no Evil Wayne Shorter manages to reach a level of brilliance that he never even achieved with the great Miles Davis Quintet of the late '60s. Compositionally it is a fantastic album with the open track witch hunt and the title track being particular gems.
There is beauty and joy to this album that comes from Shorter himself. He has a far less serious and intense style than John Coltrane, whom comparisons are inevitably drawn with, which makes his work far less effort to listen to. The other collaborators are more than competant in their perfomances as well with the expert touch of Herbie Hancock on the piano and the bewitching tones of Freddie Hubbard on trumpet blending well.
For me this is one of the classic jazz albums, and it proves the lack of justice in the world when John Coltrane is remembered more fondly by the public than the master behind this work.
Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This album is proof that the criticisms of Wayne Shorter being just another Rollins-Coltrane imitator were indeed mistaken. Shorter, who has always incorporated a stronger element of the blues in his playing than Coltrane did in the mid-sixties, mixes this with some masterly composition and improvisation. Couple this with some astounding support from prominent jazzers of the time (Elvin Jones, Freddie Hubbard, Herbie Hancock and Ron Carter) and you have an absolute classic - each track is now a standard in modern jazz repertoire.
The compositions themselves are wondrous, opening with "Witch Hunt", an interesting piece with a separate intro that moves straight into the main theme. It is a haunting blues with great solos from Shorter and Hubbard, driven along by Jones' fiery beat. "Fee-Fi-Fo-Fum" is another tune which has become a jazz standard. Hancock mimics the giant's chanting of Fee Fi Fo Fum with dissonant chords at the beginning which precedes a typically quirky and playful theme over an unusual blues progression. One might that the theme represents Jack carefully tiptoeing around, trying to avoid the giant at all costs! "Dance Cadaverous" is an interesting take on "Valse Triste" by Sibelius and it is an effective example of a classical progression being adapted for jazz. The title's association with the grislier side of life is well preserved by eerie solos by the two horns. The title track stands out due to the challenging, unsettling solos. The haunting ballad "Infant Eyes" follows. The album finishes with "Wild Flower", a signature Wayne Shorter tune which is an up-tempo waltz, featuring spirited playing from the whole ensemble.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Speak No Evil has for 13 years captivated me with the clear elegance of its melodies. Witchunt opens the album with a loud shout, and some level of risk. Fe-fi-fo has less jagged angles and blends more into the nearly sickly velvety angles of Dance Cadaverous. Speak No Evil in the centre captures the classic signature of the album. Watch for the fullness of the saxophones voice build lush in track five Infant Eyes, and wonder if the Wild Flower was right sound for the album overall? Overall, one of the finest examples of the Blue Note sound.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By KaleHawkwood TOP 100 REVIEWER on 16 Jun. 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Strange to think that Wayne Shorter, at 77, is now an elder statesman of jazz. I tend to think of him as much younger than Miles, Coltrane and the other movers & shakers of the 50s & 60s, but in fact he was only a smattering of years younger. Recorded when he was 31, he assembled a dream team for this landmark record which, like pianist Herbie Hancock`s Maiden Voyage from the same year, I`ve found to be a `grower`, uncovering its beauties and felicities with each listen.
Freddie Hubbard, Hancock and bassist Ron Carter are common to both albums, but we have the energetic, not to mention ubiquitous, Elvin Jones (1927-2004) in the drum seat on this date, and he propels each track along in his usual pugilistic way, bless the man.
Hubbard (1938-2010) was something of a stalwart in those days, and he plays like a dream on these six tracks - with one extra alternate take. So does Hancock (still with us at 71) whose impressionistic, lucent piano is a constant joy to hear whenever he takes a solo, which is pleasingly often, not to mention his sensitive, gently buoyant accompaniment throughout.
Shorter himself - not always a tenor whose playing is easy to `grasp`, with an elusive, hermetic style at times - plays quite beautifully here, a highlight being his lengthy solo on Infant Eyes, a lovely ballad by the sax player. Indeed all the tracks are Shorter originals. Sometimes compared to Coltrane, I`d say Shorter has a slightly more rounded tone, is more obviously lyrical, equally unsentimental, less frenetic on the faster numbers. But why compare...?
The more I listen to this very fine disc, the fewer `highlights` there are, as all the tracks are perfect in their ways.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback