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Spaces of Hope (California Studies in Critical Human Geography) Paperback – 29 Mar 2000

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Paperback: 303 pages
  • Publisher: University of California Press (29 Mar. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520225783
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520225787
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.5 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,159,326 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

An inspiring, well written and beautifully illustrated book, and one that I hope will help to change the trajectory of social existence as well as academic inquiry. -- Diane Perrons It is refreshing to read a book that not only represents a major scholarly achievement, but that also breathes enthusiasm, commitment, displays a clearly situated positionality, and is energised by the belief that a better world is there to be fought for and made. Students of the urban condition should be grateful to David Harvey for his rigorous and challenging scholarship and for the creativity of his imaginative vision. There is much to praise. One thing I love is the way it is written. Harvey's prose is so clear and precise ... I was reminded of how consistently Harvey has insisted on the centrality of the geographical to both the critique of this world and the possibility of the next. We could not wish for a more compelling ambassador. This is a very intriguing book. It bristles with ideas and the scope of Harvey's interests seem to be ever growing ! his analyses are rich with insight. An inspiring, well written and beautifully illustrated book, and one that I hope will help to change the trajectory of social existence as well as academic inquiry. It is refreshing to read a book that not only represents a major scholarly achievement, but that also breathes enthusiasm, commitment, displays a clearly situated positionality, and is energised by the belief that a better world is there to be fought for and made. Students of the urban condition should be grateful to David Harvey for his rigorous and challenging scholarship and for the creativity of his imaginative vision. There is much to praise. One thing I love is the way it is written. Harvey's prose is so clear and precise ... I was reminded of how consistently Harvey has insisted on the centrality of the geographical to both the critique of this world and the possibility of the next. We could not wish for a more compelling ambassador. This is a very intriguing book. It bristles with ideas and the scope of Harvey's interests seem to be ever growing ! his analyses are rich with insight. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

David Harvey is Professor of Geography at the Johns Hopkins University and adjunct Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics. He was previously Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. His books include Social Justice and the City (1973); The Limits to Capital (1982); The Urban Experience (1988); The Condition of Postmodernity (1989); and Justice, Nature and the Geography of Difference (1996). He received the Outstanding Contributor award from the Association of American Geographers in 1980; the Anders Retzius Gold Medal from the Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography in 1989; the Patron's Medal from the Royal Geographical Society and the Vautrin Lud Prize in France in 1995. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


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Format: Paperback
David Harvey puts forward an interesting argument, providing a marxist-inspired critical assessment of the social order built upon the values of capitalist production. The traditional utopian approaches are discussed, and a distinction between utopias of space and process is developed. Harvey suggests a concept of "dialectical utopianism" as a means for overcomming the rigidities of the exclusively spatial or temporal utopias.
Harvey's take on economic and social inequality in the age of globalisation is very interesting, and the assessment of utopia from a geographical perspective is quite unusual. The book is highly informational and provides a lot of insights into the issues of environmental activism, urban life, and the culture of escapism. Harvey may lack the expertise when it comes to the analysis of utopian texts, but he certainly has the contagious enthusiasm and desire not to just criticise the system, but try to change it as well.
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