Spacehawks [VINYL] has been added to your Basket
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
Quantity:1

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £7.99

Spacehawks [VINYL]

3.9 out of 5 stars 39 customer reviews

Price: £20.42 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
AutoRip is available only for eligible CDs and vinyl sold by Amazon EU Sarl (but does not apply to gift orders or PrimeNow orders). See Terms and Conditions for full details, including costs which may apply for the MP3 version in case of order returns or cancellations.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Complete your purchase to add the MP3 version to your Amazon music library. Provided by Amazon EU S.à r.l.
15 new from £19.99
£20.42 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's Hawkwind Store


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Spacehawks [VINYL]
  • +
  • Looking For Love In The Lost Land Of Dreams [VINYL]
Total price: £38.01
Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Vinyl (9 Dec. 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Rock Classics
  • ASIN: B00EZSDCRQ
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 250,116 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Plenty of divided opinions on this albums tracklisting in other reviews, I see. Perhaps this perspective will help. Hawkwind were due to tour in America for the first time in yonks, so decide to put out a sort of "primer" to let their American fans know what they are capable of live nowadays. Hence, most of the tracks on this album are in the current (2013) stage show. The new recordings of old songs are what they sound like played by the current band, and very nice too: complaining that they don't sound as good as the originals is slightly missing the point.
"Where are they now?" is an old song that hasn't been recorded before and to Hawkwind fans is worth the price of the album alone. Other new music on this album is fine, modern Hawk music, and in keeping with the sound of recent albums. Including songs from Dave Brocks solo album (we took the wrong step..) and Hawkwind Light Orchestra (it's all lies) does confuse matters a little but as they are both good songs this shouldn't be viewed too harshly.
Overall then, this album shows what the band sound like now: it's perhaps not an essential purchase but I think it is pretty interesting and serves its purpose well.
Comment 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a bit of a muddle, and somewhat confusing coming not long after their last studio albums. It's a mix of studio recordings of old songs (Assault and Battery, Masters of the University, Demented Man) , remixes of tracks from recent albums, and some new tracks plus a track from Dave Brock's recent solo album.

It's all ok, but just a little pointless. I enjoyed the studio recordings of the old songs - the lineup of Hawkwind changes so much, these things tend to sound different to the originals, and this case we have Brock's chunky guitar riffing away and a somewhat overloaded backing of synths and whooshing sounds. I don't actually mind this sort of thing with Hawkwind, as it always brings something new along. I particularly like the reworking of Assault and Battery. The tracks from Onward are somewhat forgettable, though.

The remake of Masters of the Universe is much more like 1980s Hawkwind, and features Huw Lloyd Langton on guitar. Again, it's a different beast to the original, but I enjoyed it. Lots of guitar, the whooshing synths and some frantic drumming make this one!

The new tracks are mainly short instrumental passages, apart from Sacrosanct, which is 8 minutes long, and this is an almost trance-like track with some chilled out beats and plenty of Orb-like synths. Very good indeed, as I like The Orb. The others are mainly noises and atmospherics, some which (Touch) have some nice gentle, melodic guitar work.

This is an enjoyable enough compilation of odds and ends, but it's most certainly not essential. Still, I'd rather have a compilation of mainly new material, even if it re-recordings by the current lineup.
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Yes, I know that much of this album contains re-recorded tracks but as a complete album it does rock. I saw Hawkwind in 73 and have been a follower ever since. I've followed them through their more experimental times, Bridget Wishart, the 80's electronic stuff and the more recent, more dense stuff like Blood of the Earth. So, for me, this album is a Hawkwind 'feel good' album. An album that takes you back but still takes some different tacks at times. Quite a few long-term Hawkwind fans seem disappointed; I'm just really happy to get a new Hawkwind album that rocks a fair bit.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Well we have 16 tracks here, two of which 'We took the Wrong Step' and 'It's All Lies' are not actually Hawkwind per se [Dave Brock solo and 'Hawkwind Light Orchestra' respectively]. Of the remainder three tracks are remixes of recent album tracks, another is a shortened version of another recent album track, six are studio reworkings of "classic" numbers and four are genuine new numbers. Of these 'Sacrosanct' has a certain something, 'Lonely Moon' is beautiful but could do with being longer, 'Touch' is OK and 'The Chumps Are Jumping' isn't very good. Hmmmm. The three remixes of recent tracks are better than the originals [but they should have been mixed properly in the first place of course]. The six studio reworkings cannot by definition really match the originals (except Where Are They Now, which was never done in the studio first time around) and therein lies the problem, it seems a little pointless. I suppose this means that the next studio album should now contain all-new material as presumably all the recent 'reworkings' are all here aren't they? And if this means 40 minutes of killer new original material as opposed to stretching things out to say 50 or 60 minutes by adding reworkings then so be it. Otherwise take a leaf out of Blue Oyster Cult's book and don't do any new studio albums unless you have anything new to say!!
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Ok take away the remakes and what do you have left?
Well not much but the remakes make up for this shortfall.
The oldies certainly seem timeless and listening to this album just made me put on Space Ritual after it finished.
Oh what would I give to be transported back in time.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I guess this is what can be described as a modern compilation. A mix of tracks from recent albums, remixes from recent albums, recordings of some old tracks and a sprinkling of new stuff.

The new stuff is mainly short fairly inconsequential instrumentals. Sacrosant is much longer with the sequencer and drum machine backing some guitar and other stuff and is a decent splash of electronica. The others might have been best distributed around as these short pieces usually are on Hawkwind albums.

Three tracks are representative of the recent replaying of Warrior on the Edge of Time live to coincide with the release of the studio album. Assault and Battery is in it's usual modern shortened form as sounds very good. The Golden Void is also short and not at it's best. These two are played as the recent live version with Where Are They Now which also comes from that time I think and while short is a classic simple Hawkwind idea and the best thing on the album. The Demented Man is good but I'm not sure the straight repeat of the song is a good idea.

Where Are They Now also comes from that time I think and while short is a classic simple Hawkwind idea and the best thing on the album. The re-recording of Master of the Universe is worth its place for the appearance of the greatly missed Huw Lloyd-Langton and it is a cracking version. Sonic Attack was probably only really good once. This is OK - the vocal are better than usual and it goes off into a bit of rock music at the end although I'm not the vocals here are a good idea. It's OK though. Whether it's necessary is a whole different question. We Two are One is described as a new recording of the ".." track from Onward without the stuff at the end. At least the track has a name and it is a decent track.
Read more ›
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback