Buy Used
£1.96
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

South of Broad Hardcover – 1 Jul 2010

3.9 out of 5 stars 35 customer reviews

See all 19 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£4.57 £0.01
click to open popover

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Corvus; Main edition (1 July 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848875002
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848875005
  • Product Dimensions: 16.7 x 4 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 724,129 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

'A big sweeping novel of friendship and marriage... The millions of readers who cherish Conroy's work won't be at all disappointed - and nor will anyone who owns stock in Kleenex.' Chris Bohjalian, Washington Post

About the Author

Pat Conroy was the author of six previous novels: The Boo, The Water Is Wide, The Great Santini, The Lords of Discipline, The Prince of Tides and Beach Music. He lived in Fripp Island, South Carolina, and died in 2016.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Most of the reviews I've read on this book read like a broken record..."I've waited so long for Conroy to write a new book", "I so wanted to love it and I didn't" or "It didn't live up to my expectations". And these are the reviews from longtime Conroy fans. Yet, even with all of this, most reviewers admit that even a "not great" Conroy book is far better than most of what else is out there. So will my review read like these broken records?...no. But I will say that somewhere along the way, when Conroy was walking "south of Broad", he turned left when he should have turned right and what we're left with is the problem most of the reviewers are writing about.

The book is divided into five parts. While reading the first part, I emailed a friend of mine telling her that I was 100 pages into South of Broad and loving every word I was reading. So, at this point, I couldn't understand all of the so-so reviews. Then I got to Part 2 and I started to understand. Part 3 justified these so-so feelings. Thank goodness for Part 4 and Part 5....otherwise this review might have been heading south all on its own.

It all begins on Bloomsday, June 16, 1969, when, as an upcoming high school senior, Leopold Bloom King meets eight people who will change his life forever. All in one day, his future will be set out before him as it is these eight people who will become his lifelong friends. For those of you who don't know the significance of Bloomsday, it refers to James Joyce's novel Ulysses where all the events take place on the same day, June 16, 1904, in Dublin and, the main character in Joyce's novel happens to be named Leopold Bloom. So it almost makes sense that our Leopold Bloom King will have events occur all on the same day that will shape his life as well.
Read more ›
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Now my review is not going to go back over the storyline or the characters....because many other reviewers have already done that and have done it far better than I could. But what did I get from this book? Well I got a story I looked forward to picking up every opportunity and I didn't race through it either because Conroy's descriptions of Charleston made me want to read slowly and absorb the neighbourhoods and landscapes. This book held my attention from start to finish It's pure Fiction and I love Fiction and I don't think it pretends to be anything else. It is happy, sad, hopeful and always hard to put down. Pat Conroy has an uncanny knack of making you feel as though you are in Charleston ...sort of like taking a tour of the city from your couch! I even went on online to Google Maps to take a closer look at the town. Five stars for enjoyment and pure escapism. This was my kind of book!
1 Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
There's an awful lot of crying in this book. Everybody cries. Grown men fall down on the ground and howl - and invariably are then surrounded by an assortment of chums and colleagues who do a lot of hugging. Do Southern people really carry on like this? After what - 14 years? - this book is a bit of a disappointment. It seems rather formulaic, takes far too long to get into and the surprise ending is no surprise. Has Conroy lost the plot? His prose has always been overblown and florid, and mostly enjoyable, but this is going to far. For God's sake, Pat, hold the tears.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By prisrob TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 May 2013
Format: Paperback
Pat Conroy brings out the best and the worst in his characters. Does he bring out the best and the worst in his readers? I absolutely loved the book and at times I hated it. The characters came alive and I grew to care about them and then the worst of all occurs. This love/hate relationship has got to go!

Leo King or Toad to his friends, is the kind of young man whose life falls apart when his brother commits suicide. Out of the blue, he and his family are swept into the unknown and Leo can't cope. In and out of mental hospitals, his mother can't quite find it in her heart to love him. His father becomes his family and keeps his world from falling apart again, and somehow, Leo becomes the kind of kid everyone loves. He makes friends, but as you see, his friends are the lonely, they always need friends. Sheba and Trevor and Niles and Starla and Ike and Betty, the kids that are gay or black, or without any class. Fraser, Chad and Molly are the upper class, the intelligentsia of the city. These are the friends that Leo has and in the city he loves, we come to know them all and root for them.

Charleston, South Carolina, the jewel of the south. The junction between the Cooper and the Ashley Rivers is called 'South of Broad'. This is where Leo and his friends lived their young lives. Leo's mom was the principal and his father taught science at the public high school. He and his friends had the best and the worst of times in their young lives. The white and blacks learned to integrate, the football team had their wins and losses. They loved and they lived and the mysteries and secrets of each of them are unfolded as time goes on. The father of Sheba and Trevor, the madman that he is, raises havoc and has them all in his sights.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I have been fan of all Pat Conroy's books from Prince of Tides to Beach Music and this in no way compares to his other books. Tom Wingo and Jack McCall are great characters and those 2 books I have read over and over again. This one I finished and have now given to the local Oxfam shop as I will never be reading it again. Leo King was in no way compared to his other protagonists and a rather annoying person as he was just too nice. I have been so looking forward to his new book and this have been such a disappointment.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category