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The Sound of Sirens by [Carter, David]
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The Sound of Sirens Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Length: 333 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

About the Author

About David’s Books: “The Sound of Sirens” features Inspector Walter Darriteau who is based in Chester in the north-west of England. You might also be interested in another Inspector Walter Darriteau murder mystery, and if you are please do check out “The Murder Diaries Seven Times Over”. If modern contemporary love stories are more your scene then you might like to take a look at “The Life and Loves of Gringo Greene” which is David’s “For Adults Only” book. For older children you might wish to consider “Drift and Badger and the Search for Uncle Mo” which tells the story of an orphaned deer fawn lost in the forest. And combining World War Two, older children’s adventure, and a murder mystery, you might be interested in David’s first fictional book, “The Fish Catcher” which tells the story of the Fissleborough sisters who are evacuated from London to avoid the blitz during the war. David’s mother was an evacuee and some of her stories inevitably find their way into this book. You can see and read more information on all of David’s books on his website: www.davidcarterbooks.co.uk

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1393 KB
  • Print Length: 333 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1482307723
  • Publisher: TrackerDog Media; 2 edition (29 Jan. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00I51HV58
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #557,797 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
David Carter has triumphed again with yet another Walter Darriteau murder mystery. Believe you me this is not my favourite genre given the gory bits, which won’t disappoint here if you are into that kind of thing but having said that I like a good puzzle and boy does this one deliver!

Carter sets the scene, two guys, the young one awaiting the old one, clandestine meeting, packet exchanged, opened, the moon setting the newly acquired handgun alight resting in the young guy’s hand, the distant beat of soft rock resonating from the nearby pub. Luke Flowers has a job to do but can he be trusted? From its horrific inception this story cleverly pulls in characters, their background, their raison d'être. Carter is a master of this, drawing on all the senses until we can hear, see, smell, taste and touch all that impinges on their variety of existence, from local to far flung places giving ethnic and cultural prominence, all successfully geared to creating substantial, believable characters the reader can’t fail to bond with.

I’ve already met Inspector Walter Darriteau in ‘The Murder Diaries Seven Times Over’ (well reviewed here). He’s a solid, dependable, ordinary kind of guy that’s never done thinking. His mind’s sharp, very sharp but is he going to crack this one, or two, or three? Yes this story moves along quickly, it’s a cliché I know but I couldn’t turn the pages fast enough, for this story plays with the reader, minute diversions, false starts, Inspector Darriteau sharp as the family heirloom securely displayed inside a cabinet on the wall in The State of Kerala Restaurant, Chester. He likes dining Indian, here, it’s his favourite restaurant. He knows the family well but how well?
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was one of my favourite reads of recent months, a really refreshing novel that kept me engrossed throughout.

I liked the writing style and David Carter has a unique way with words, his descriptions are particularly strong and he knows what to write without waffling on. The writing style, combined with well-researched material and a great lead character in Inspector Walter Darriteau made sure the storyline never lost its zest.

The plots and sub-plots are woven together in an accomplished manner, the sign of a great storyteller. Highly recommended to anyone who enjoys great writing.
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The Sound of Sirens is an engaging and intriguing crime mystery taking place in Chester, England. It's gritty, dark and expresses the underbelly of the city. The characters are a collection of people from all walks of life, but they share one thing in common secrets.

The story opens with an intriguing meet-up between two men, the reader is immediately grabbed by this clandestine set-up. This meeting leads to a murder, unfortunately for the hit man, his contractor and the victim things don't go to plan. There is a murder but was the target the intended person?

The lead Detective Walter Darriteau has to unravel what is going on and why. He's a well-drawn character, believable and likable. The supporting characters stand out, and add layers to a good story. The author writes with gritty realism, the dialogue is realistic and the reader is pulled into a dark underworld.

My only gripe has nothing to do with the story but the formatting. My reading was interrupted by the arbitrary breaks which ended up dividing sentences partway through them, placing dialogue from two different characters on the same line. If the formatting is corrected this will be a very good read.
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This is a very realistic crime story, featuring an interesting Detective with a murder mystery to solve. The characters were well developed and believable, both the good and bad guys. The author did an excellent job of keeping me intrigued, as the story twisted one way and then another. Looking back at the end it was interesting to think how different the motives for murder were, compared to my thoughts early in the book.

The author has a unique writing style and I look forward to reading more of his books featuring Detective Darriteau. If you like an English murder/mystery you will definitely enjoy this read.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars 10 reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoying my reading through The Sound of Sirens 10 April 2014
By 3BooksAWeek - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am wondering how Inspector Walter Darriteau will solve the crime...

Enjoyed a good urban mystery novel filled with action, intrigue and suspense.

Recommending to my friends and giving out as gifts.
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning mystery! 29 Jan. 2014
By Rambling Rose - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
**I received a free ARC of the book from the author in exchange for my fair and honest review.**

In "The Sound of Sirens" Inspector Walter Darriteau is faced with one tough crime. A young man, gunned down onstage in a local pub by a hitman, who has just killed the wrong person. There are suspects galore, and clues leading this way and that, leaving the reader wondering until the end, "Whodunit?"

"The Sound of Sirens" is my first introduction to Inspector Walter Darriteau, but I felt as if I was greeted by an old friend. His character is very well developed, and though he appeared in a previous book ("The Murder Diaries Seven Times Over"), the reader can pick up this book without fear of jumping in the middle of a story.

All of the characters, in fact, are three-dimensional and interesting. As each character is introduced, their role in the tangled web of murder for hire and other such nasty business is carefully revealed, leading to multiple "ah-ha!" and "oh no, no, no!" moments for the reader.

The familiar mystery theme is well-done and contagious, reminding me of all my favorite mystery writers. The truth behind the murder at the beginning of the story is slowly leaked over the course of the story, and the pacing is beautifully set. I couldn't help but turn the page long past bedtime, hungry for that next clue. Though there are a few subplots, they are tied directly to the main plot so that they do not disturb the reader as they race with Walter to solve the crime.

David Carter's writing style is unique and intriguing. Fragmented sentences shouldn't work in a book, that's what all writers are taught, but Carter uses them in such a way that his writing has a tempo of its own, much like a familiar song that soothes one's soul. He masterfully weaves words in and out of the story, planting a perfect picture in the reader's head.

I cannot recommend this book enough. It is fun, exciting, humorous at times, and bloody and shocking in all the right moments. If you're salivating for a new crime-solving hero, look no further than Inspector Walter Darriteau.
4.0 out of 5 stars I Guess I'm Just "Old School" 2 Jun. 2014
By Patricia Reding - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
The author provided me with a copy of The Sound of Sirens in exchange for my fair and honest review.

I must say that I had some difficulty in determining how to “rate” this read in terms of stars. The story moves along and was well thought through, but I had one issue with it that I just couldn’t let go. Specifically, that was the author’s common use of incomplete sentences, which made the reading a bit difficult for me.

There seems to be a current trend, a fad almost, to write in a style I find somewhat akin to (for lack of a better description) “stream of consciousness.” I know the traditional description of this form means that the writing itself is often just a stream of words, likely even lacking punctuation—which is not the case here. But, I find the author’s style similar in that the work draws the reader to follow the narrator’s “thoughts.” This style does work—particularly for a story told from a single perspective and in first person. It gets the reader right into the action, allowing him (or her) to follow along with the character’s internal musings. It can even set a mood, which I must admit, it did do in the opening scene of The Sound of Sirens. Even so, I find the style a bit . . . frustrating, as I long for the complete sentence. Further, this style, on occasion, shifted the scene in The Sound of Sirens rather suddenly from one viewpoint to another.

All that said, I did not find myself floundering around, trying to determine what was happening, as is often the case when things are written in cryptic little spasms. (Consider: “Moonless night, dry too, a hint of June balminess in the air.” “Pulled back into the shop doorway, took a drag on the fag.” “Didn’t speak.” “Took out the handgun.” “Gleamed in the moonlight.” These are just a few examples and they all come from the first page/scene of this read.) As I said, I always knew what was happening. I just found my reading halted at every semi-sentence. It is as though there is a little signal in my head somewhere that flashes “Error! Error!” whenever I read things in this style. I guess I’m old school . . . (longing, as I said, for the complete sentence). Having said that, I repeat: the author never left me wondering what was happening.

The Sound of Sirens is a story that includes a vast array of well drawn characters, including Walter Darritreau, the lead investigator; Luke Flowers, a contract killer; Gerry Swaythling, a wealthy man whose son had been Luke Flowers’s intended hit; Langley Wells, a loan shark; and many more. The cast included both heroes and villains, all of which were well drawn. The characters were varied and interesting. I also appreciated the manner in which Carter spoke of a murder that some might dub an “honor killing.”

I did find Inspector Walter Darritreau’s resolution of the case a bit odd in that he used information theretofore unknown to the reader—or at least to this reader. (Did I miss something?). Had some of the details been scattered about throughout the story at earlier times, Darritreau’s summation would have been even more fulfilling for me, as I would either have surmised some of the details myself, or I would have chastised myself for having missed them! Thus, in some ways, the summation seemed a bit too convenient.

All in all, The Sound of Sirens engaged me. I rooted for the good guys and was rightfully irritated by the bad guys. For me, one good way to determine how to “rate” a work is to consider whether I would read more by this author. When considering the story in that light, I would have to say that I most definitely would read more from David Carter. Thus, I have attached to this read, a four-star rating.

Also posted at [...], GoodReads and BookLikes and added to my Facebook page and to two Google+ review groups, tweeted and cover pinned.
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast-Paced, Action-Packed Murder Mystery! 14 April 2014
By Believer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
"The Sound Of Sirens" is a fast-paced, action-packed murder mystery that unfolds in Chester England as the dogged sleuth , Inspector Walter Darriteau, and his team hunt for the killer of the lead singer in a band known locally as the All Souls. As the peace of the ancient city is shattered by four gunshots, a local crime reporter Gardenia Floem suddenly turns up at the murder scene to glean the details of a possible drug related killing, only to face the formidable silence of the distracted Inspector. What follows is a riveting tale of mystery, murder and intrigue as the body count climbs and the deaths become unexpectedly linked.

With skilful dexterity David Carter has developed a well-written plot that explores troubling issues like killers for hire, money lending, honour killings and racism. His writing skill is unique especially his use of short sentences that add to the pulsating tempo of the story. His striking description of the sights and sounds of Chester and its colourful, multi-national populace lend to the style and dimension of this beautifully crafted murder-mystery. Into the narrative are woven multiple subplots that not only give personal insight into the lives of those connected to the murder victims, but a link to Walter's initial investigation. It's these threads in the story that form and converge in a shocking ending.

The personalities of the characters are well-developed and complex with all their flaws, faults and strengths especially the honourable and perceptive Jamaican, Inspector Walter Darriteau. With a clever analytical mind, the intense and unruffled detective with strong-willed determination unravels clues to a baffling crime. A man who is dedicated and hardworking, he finds little time , initiative or energy to end the loneliness in his private life. Included in his team of investigators is his partner, the attractive and cheeky Sergeant Karen Greenwood; the inimitable DC Darren Gibbons; the keen, capable Hector Browne and their no-nonsense boss Joan West. All add spice and humour to a difficult and complicated investigation.

Even the criminals are memorable like the tough, blunt, power-hungry moneylender Langley Wells;the moody, controlling lecherous murderer Luke Flowers, and the warped, cruel and heartless Wazir Kahan. And these are only a fraction of the characters that add power and intensity to a tantalizing plot that ends with the revelation of an unexpected culprit.

I can't say enough about this wonderfully crafted Inspector and his investigative team, or what a delight it was to read a novel that engages the reader from the first page to the last. David Carter is definitely a gifted writer and I intend to read more of Inspector Walter Darriteau's adventures, in the hope he will eventually find a middle-aged woman who will end his loneliness and keep his apartment thoroughly clean.
5.0 out of 5 stars Credible, Exciting, Intriguing! Sheer non-stop mystery from this highly gifted author 30 Jan. 2014
By Margaret Henderson Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
David Carter has triumphed again with yet another Walter Darriteau murder mystery. Believe you me this is not my favourite genre given the gory bits, which won’t disappoint here if you are into that kind of thing but having said that I like a good puzzle and boy does this one deliver!

Carter sets the scene, two guys, the young one awaiting the old one, clandestine meeting, packet exchanged, opened, the moon setting the newly acquired handgun alight resting in the young guy’s hand, the distant beat of soft rock resonating from the nearby pub. Luke Flowers has a job to do but can he be trusted? From its horrific inception this story cleverly pulls in characters, their background, their raison d'être. Carter is a master of this, drawing on all the senses until we can hear, see, smell, taste and touch all that impinges on their variety of existence, from local to far flung places giving ethnic and cultural prominence, all successfully geared to creating substantial, believable characters the reader can’t fail to bond with.

I’ve already met Inspector Walter Darriteau in ‘The Murder Diaries Seven Times Over’ (well reviewed here). He’s a solid, dependable, ordinary kind of guy that’s never done thinking. His mind’s sharp, very sharp but is he going to crack this one, or two, or three? Yes this story moves along quickly, it’s a cliché I know but I couldn’t turn the pages fast enough, for this story plays with the reader, minute diversions, false starts, Inspector Darriteau sharp as the family heirloom securely displayed inside a cabinet on the wall in The State of Kerala Restaurant, Chester. He likes dining Indian, here, it’s his favourite restaurant. He knows the family well but how well? He’s 58 and lives alone, though from choice he’d rather be sharing his house with someone young and attractive like Galina his Eastern European cleaner. There’s not much spare brain space for dreaming but he lets his fancy for her slip through his thinking, never does it cross his mind that there could be another out there, duplicating thoughts, fancying him.

This book is simply packed with plots and subplots given such coherence in the smooth running of the mystery as to be absolutely astounding. Carter’s an astute observer, too, capturing the non-verbal interaction with skill, drawing out differing characters’ thinking, be it humorous, scathing, suspicious, capricious, just to mention a few of the character traits responsible and piling in to make this book such a credible read. David Carter does indeed possess a remarkable talent, he knows just how to hook his readers and keep them.

This work is action packed, exciting, thrilling, scary, with a twist to the dénouement which can only be described as brilliant. You certainly don’t have to be a fan of the genre to enjoy this one. It’s high calibre writing but then one wouldn’t expect anything less from David Carter. It’s meticulously researched giving substantial historical background particularly to immigrant life and present day cultural integration, which is worth mentioning, though it does not constitute the main focus. Indeed this sense of insight in all its variety permeates and enhances the whole story leaving the reader with a sense of satisfaction from time enjoyed and very well spent in the reading of this book. I congratulate David Carter on yet another superb tale and can but very highly recommend this book to all.
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