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And Sons Hardcover – 23 Jul 2013

3.4 out of 5 stars 47 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 434 pages
  • Publisher: Random House (23 July 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812993969
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812993967
  • Product Dimensions: 16.8 x 2.9 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,117,605 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

A "NEW YORK TIMES "EDITORS' CHOICE
"Six months from now, Gilbert's should be among the half-dozen or so names cited by critics and serious readers when they're asked who produced 2013's most dazzlingly smart, fully realized works of fiction."--"The Washington Post"
" "
"A grand book, even extraordinary."--Lev Grossman, "Time"
" "
"If you read only a few books this year, this one should be one of them."--The Huffington Post
"Clear the sand from your beach-book-overloaded mind for this smart, engrossing saga about a reclusive famous author and his late-life attempt to make amends to the many people he's let down. Perfect for fans of Jonathan Franzen or Claire Messud."--"Entertainment Weekly"
"A contemporary New York variation on "The Brothers Karamazov, " featuring a J. D. Salinger-like writer in the role of Father, and a protagonist who turns out to be as questionable a tour guide as the notoriously unreliable narrator of Ford Madox Ford's classic "The Good Soldier" . . . a big, ambitious book about fathers and sons, Oedipal envy and sibling rivalry, and the dynamics between art and life, talent and virtue. The novel is smart, funny, observant and . . . does a wonderful job of conjuring up its characters' memories of growing up in New York City in layered, almost Proustian detail."--Michiko Kakutani, "The New York Times"
"[A] throwback literary novel . . . Its rueful, poetic vision of faded WASP grandeur is frequently heartbreaking."--"People"
" "
"Very nearly a masterwork. Gilbert is an assured, versatile and often very funny writer."--"The Dallas Morning News"
" "
"Throughout "& Sons, " Gilbert provides lengthy excerpts from [his] novel-within-a-novel, and, as far as the reader can tell, "Ampersand" is caustic, comic, and clever, like Gilbert's own novel. . . . Gilbert has a rich theme, and plenty of talent. He has a wonderfully sharp eye for the emotional reticence of the men of A. N. Dyer's generatio

A "NEW YORK TIMES "EDITORS' CHOICE
"Gilbert's should be among the half-dozen or so names cited by critics and serious readers when they're asked who produced [the year's] most dazzlingly smart, fully realized works of fiction."--"The Washington Post"
" "
"A grand book, even extraordinary."--Lev Grossman, "Time"
" "
"If you read only a few books this year, this one should be one of them."--The Huffington Post
"Clear the sand from your beach-book-overloaded mind for this smart, engrossing saga about a reclusive famous author and his late-life attempt to make amends to the many people he's let down. Perfect for fans of Jonathan Franzen or Claire Messud."--"Entertainment Weekly"
"A contemporary New York variation on "The Brothers Karamazov, " featuring a J. D. Salinger-like writer in the role of Father, and a protagonist who turns out to be as questionable a tour guide as the notoriously unreliable narrator of Ford Madox Ford's classic "The Good Soldier" . . . a big, ambitious book about fathers and sons, Oedipal envy and sibling rivalry, and the dynamics between art and life, talent and virtue. The novel is smart, funny, observant and . . . does a wonderful job of conjuring up its characters' memories of growing up in New York City in layered, almost Proustian detail."--Michiko Kakutani, "The New York Times"
"[A] throwback literary novel . . . Its rueful, poetic vision of faded WASP grandeur is frequently heartbreaking."--"People"
" "
"Very nearly a masterwork. Gilbert is an assured, versatile and often very funny writer."--"The Dallas Morning News"
" "
"Throughout "& Sons, " Gilbert provides lengthy excerpts from [his] novel-within-a-novel, and, as far as the reader can tell, "Ampersand" is caustic, comic, and clever, like Gilbert's own novel. . . . Gilbert has a rich theme, and plenty of talent. He has a wonderfully sharp eye for the emotional reticence of the men of A. N. Dyer's generation and class, fo

"In terms of sheer reading pleasure, my favorite book this year was "& Sons, " David Gilbert's big, intelligent, richly textured novel about fathers, sons, friendship, and legacies. . . . From [A. N.] Dyer's slacker sons to a J. Crew-wearing young seductress, every member of Gilbert's cast of characters is perfectly drawn."--Ruth Franklin, "The New Yorker"
"Gilbert's should be among the half-dozen or so names cited by critics and serious readers when they're asked who produced [the year's] most dazzlingly smart, fully realized works of fiction."--"The Washington Post"
" "
"A grand book, even extraordinary."--Lev Grossman, "Time"
" "
"If you read only a few books this year, this one should be one of them."--The Huffington Post
"Clear the sand from your beach-book-overloaded mind for this smart, engrossing saga about a reclusive famous author and his late-life attempt to make amends to the many people he's let down. Perfect for fans of Jonathan Franzen or Claire Messud."--"Entertainment Weekly"
"A contemporary New York variation on "The Brothers Karamazov, " featuring a J. D. Salinger-like writer in the role of Father, and a protagonist who turns out to be as questionable a tour guide as the notoriously unreliable narrator of Ford Madox Ford's classic "The Good Soldier" . . . a big, ambitious book about fathers and sons, Oedipal envy and sibling rivalry, and the dynamics between art and life, talent and virtue. The novel is smart, funny, observant and . . . does a wonderful job of conjuring up its characters' memories of growing up in New York City in layered, almost Proustian detail."--Michiko Kakutani, "The New York Times"
"[A] throwback literary novel . . . Its rueful, poetic vision of faded WASP grandeur is frequently heartbreaking."--"People"
" "
"Very nearly a masterwork. Gilbert is an assured, versatile and often very funny writer."--"The Dallas Morning News"
" "
"Throughout "& Sons, " Gilbert provid

"[A] big, brilliant novel."--"The New York Times Book Review"
"In terms of sheer reading pleasure, my favorite book this year was "& Sons, " David Gilbert's big, intelligent, richly textured novel about fathers, sons, friendship, and legacies. . . . From [A. N.] Dyer's slacker sons to a J. Crew-wearing young seductress, every member of Gilbert's cast of characters is perfectly drawn."--Ruth Franklin, "The New Yorker"
"Gilbert's should be among the half-dozen or so names cited by critics and serious readers when they're asked who produced [the year's] most dazzlingly smart, fully realized works of fiction."--"The Washington Post"
" "
"A grand book, even extraordinary."--Lev Grossman, "Time"
" "
"If you read only a few books this year, this one should be one of them."--The Huffington Post
"Clear the sand from your beach-book-overloaded mind for this smart, engrossing saga about a reclusive famous author and his late-life attempt to make amends to the many people he's let down. Perfect for fans of Jonathan Franzen or Claire Messud."--"Entertainment Weekly"
"A contemporary New York variation on "The Brothers Karamazov, " featuring a J. D. Salinger-like writer in the role of Father, and a protagonist who turns out to be as questionable a tour guide as the notoriously unreliable narrator of Ford Madox Ford's classic "The Good Soldier" . . . a big, ambitious book about fathers and sons, Oedipal envy and sibling rivalry, and the dynamics between art and life, talent and virtue. The novel is smart, funny, observant and . . . does a wonderful job of conjuring up its characters' memories of growing up in New York City in layered, almost Proustian detail."--Michiko Kakutani, "The New York Times"
"[A] throwback literary novel . . . Its rueful, poetic vision of faded WASP grandeur is frequently heartbreaking."--"People"
" "
"Very nearly a masterwork. Gilbert is an assured, versatile and often very funny writer."--"The Dallas Morning News"
" "
"Throughout "& Sons, " Gilbert provides lengthy excerpts from [his] novel-within-a-novel, and, as far as the reader can tell, "Ampersand" is caustic, comic, and clever, like Gilbert's own novel. . . . Gilbert has a rich theme, and plenty of talent. He has a wonderfully sharp eye for the emotional reticence of the men of A. N. Dyer's generation and class, for the ways in which their more open, more voluble children must become expert readers of patriarchal gaps and silences, in order to make sense of what he finely calls 'these heavily redacted men.' . . . Gilbert often writes superbly, his sentences crisp, witty, and rightly weighted. . . . Some of [his metaphors] realign the visual world, asking us, as Nabokov's best metaphors do, to estrange in order to reconnect. . . . Every page proposes something clever and well turned. Gilbert is bursting with little achievements. . . . This is a writer capable of something as beautifully simple, and achingly deep, as this description of Richard and Jamie, as they see their mother approaching them in the pub: 'The brothers straightened, reshaped as sons.'"--James Wood, "The New Yorker"
" "
"This great big novel is also infused with warmth and wisdom about what it means to be a family."--"The Boston Globe"
"When someone uses the term 'instant classic, ' I typically want to grab him and ask, 'So this is, what, like the new "Great Expectations"? You sure about that?' But David Gilbert's novel "& Sons, " seductive and ripe with both comedy and heartbreak, made me reconsider my stance on such a label. . . . This is the book I'd most like to lug from one beach to another for the rest of summer, if only I hadn't torn through it in two very happy days this spring. . . . Gilbert's portrait of [New York City] and its literary set is as smart and savage in its way as Tom Wolfe's "The Bonfire of the Vanities, " half love letter, half indictment, and wholly irresistible."--NPR
"In her iconic essay 'Goodbye to All That, ' Joan Didion famously described New York City as 'the mysterious nexus of all love and money and power, the shining and perishable dream itself.' . . . David Gilbert's layered" & Sons" probes that nexus from the inside, limning the emotional decay of two prominent Manhattan families and literary masterpiece that cages them. . . . Vivid, inventive."--"O: The Oprah Magazine"
"Gilbert has great narrative gifts and a wonderful eye for the madness of families and the madness of writers. . . . "& Sons" is a novel that creates an imaginary author who is so real and flawed that the reader feels he understands American literature itself a little better after reading his story."--"Los Angeles Times"
"Richly entertaining . . . has the rare quality of being funny without being silly, serious without being solemn, and powerfully moving without being either sentimental or coercive."--"The Guardian "(UK)
"The right novelist can turn even a novel about a novelist into a book big enough to delight all the rest of us."--Salon
"A Franzenish portrait of a biting, aging New York writer, David Gilbert's novel is perceptive, witty, and--like all great books about remote fathers and their sons--prone to leaving male readers either cursing or calling their dads."--"New York"
"A thought-provoking and engrossing read . . . I found myself falling into [the characters'] lives, caring for them, worrying for them and ultimately missing them as the novel came to a close."--"Chicago Tribune"
" "
""& Sons" is a sophisticated, compassionate novel, very much more than a clever take on the vicissitudes of the writing life. Funny and smart, it is lit with the kind of writing that makes the reader break into a smile."--"Financial Times"
"Gilbert's finely wrought prose . . . teems with elaborate word plays and tests the reader's perceptiveness at every turn."--"Vanity Fair"
"A delicious read."--New York "Daily News"
" "
"If the stylish brilliance of recent novels by Rachel Kushner, Jess Walter, and Peter Heller has been hinting at a new golden age of American prose, then David Gilbert's ambitious, sprawling, and altogether masterful second novel, "& Sons, " confirms it."--The Daily Beast
"A work of pure genius."--"The Buffalo News"
" "
"Extraordinary."--"San Francisco Chronicle"
"A witty and ultimately tragic take on the perennial subject of how the sins of the fathers are visited on their sons. There are echoes of Turgenev here, to say nothing of Jonathan Franzen and John Irving. But the music is entirely Gilbert's, and at the end of this bravura performance you'll want to give him a standing ovation."--"Newsday"
"Brilliant . . . weaves together the frayed threads of fame, fatherhood, family and friendship into a meditation on the blessing and curse of creativity . . . Thoughtful, farcical, acerbic and original, Gilbert's crisp writing and sinuous mind could grab and hold any reader."--"Bloomberg Businessweek"
"["& Sons" is] about the emotional bonds between fathers, sons and brothers--the overwhelming love that can't be adequately expressed and the burden of unspoken expectations. . . . Gilbert is an inventive, emotionally perceptive writer."--Associated Press
"Celebrates the power of words . . . thick with wit and close observation . . . ["& Sons" is] built to last."--Minneapolis "Star Tribune"
" "
""& Sons" conjures a career's worth of drool-worthy fictional fiction that's so convincingly evoked, I almost recall writing a paper on it in freshman English class."--"The New York Times Magazine"
"[A] big, rich book . . . With wit and heart, Gilbert illuminates the complicated ways that fathers and sons misunderstand, disappoint, and love one another and how their behavior affects the women in their lives."--"Real Simple"
""& Sons" is an often funny, always elegant, lingering gaze back at a world in which writers are still gods at the very center of culture."--"Esquire"

"From the Hardcover edition."

[A] big, brilliant novel. "The New York Times Book Review"
In terms of sheer reading pleasure, my favorite book this year was "& Sons, " David Gilbert s big, intelligent, richly textured novel about fathers, sons, friendship, and legacies. . . . From [A. N.] Dyer s slacker sons to a J. Crew-wearing young seductress, every member of Gilbert s cast of characters is perfectly drawn. Ruth Franklin, "The New Yorker"
Gilbert s should be among the half-dozen or so names cited by critics and serious readers when they re asked who produced [the year s] most dazzlingly smart, fully realized works of fiction. "The Washington Post"
""
A grand book, even extraordinary. Lev Grossman, "Time"
""
If you read only a few books this year, this one should be one of them. The Huffington Post
Clear the sand from your beach-book-overloaded mind for this smart, engrossing saga about a reclusive famous author and his late-life attempt to make amends to the many people he s let down. Perfect for fans of Jonathan Franzen or Claire Messud. "Entertainment Weekly"
A contemporary New York variation on "The Brothers Karamazov, " featuring a J. D. Salinger like writer in the role of Father, and a protagonist who turns out to be as questionable a tour guide as the notoriously unreliable narrator of Ford Madox Ford s classic "The Good Soldier" . . . a big, ambitious book about fathers and sons, Oedipal envy and sibling rivalry, and the dynamics between art and life, talent and virtue. The novel is smart, funny, observant and . . . does a wonderful job of conjuring up its characters memories of growing up in New York City in layered, almost Proustian detail. Michiko Kakutani, "The New York Times"
[A] throwback literary novel . . . Its rueful, poetic vision of faded WASP grandeur is frequently heartbreaking. "People"
""
Very nearly a masterwork. Gilbert is an assured, versatile and often very funny writer. "The Dallas Morning News"
""
Throughout "& Sons, " Gilbert provides lengthy excerpts from [his] novel-within-a-novel, and, as far as the reader can tell, "Ampersand" is caustic, comic, and clever, like Gilbert s own novel. . . . Gilbert has a rich theme, and plenty of talent. He has a wonderfully sharp eye for the emotional reticence of the men of A. N. Dyer s generation and class, for the ways in which their more open, more voluble children must become expert readers of patriarchal gaps and silences, in order to make sense of what he finely calls these heavily redacted men. . . . Gilbert often writes superbly, his sentences crisp, witty, and rightly weighted. . . . Some of [his metaphors] realign the visual world, asking us, as Nabokov s best metaphors do, to estrange in order to reconnect. . . . Every page proposes something clever and well turned. Gilbert is bursting with little achievements. . . . This is a writer capable of something as beautifully simple, and achingly deep, as this description of Richard and Jamie, as they see their mother approaching them in the pub: The brothers straightened, reshaped as sons. James Wood, "The New Yorker"
""
This great big novel is also infused with warmth and wisdom about what it means to be a family. "The Boston Globe"
When someone uses the term instant classic, I typically want to grab him and ask, So this is, what, like the new "Great Expectations"? You sure about that? But David Gilbert s novel "& Sons, " seductive and ripe with both comedy and heartbreak, made me reconsider my stance on such a label. . . . This is the book I d most like to lug from one beach to another for the rest of summer, if only I hadn t torn through it in two very happy days this spring. . . . Gilbert s portrait of [New York City] and its literary set is as smart and savage in its way as Tom Wolfe s "The Bonfire of the Vanities, " half love letter, half indictment, and wholly irresistible. NPR
In her iconic essay Goodbye to All That, Joan Didion famously described New York City as the mysterious nexus of all love and money and power, the shining and perishable dream itself. . . . David Gilbert s layered" & Sons" probes that nexus from the inside, limning the emotional decay of two prominent Manhattan families and literary masterpiece that cages them. . . . Vivid, inventive. "O: The Oprah Magazine"
Gilbert has great narrative gifts and a wonderful eye for the madness of families and the madness of writers. . . . "& Sons" is a novel that creates an imaginary author who is so real and flawed that the reader feels he understands American literature itself a little better after reading his story. "Los Angeles Times"
Richly entertaining . . . has the rare quality of being funny without being silly, serious without being solemn, and powerfully moving without being either sentimental or coercive. "The Guardian "(UK)
The right novelist can turn even a novel about a novelist into a book big enough to delight all the rest of us. Salon
A Franzenish portrait of a biting, aging New York writer, David Gilbert s novel is perceptive, witty, and like all great books about remote fathers and their sons prone to leaving male readers either cursing or calling their dads. "New York"
A thought-provoking and engrossing read . . . I found myself falling into [the characters ] lives, caring for them, worrying for them and ultimately missing them as the novel came to a close. "Chicago Tribune"
""
"& Sons" is a sophisticated, compassionate novel, very much more than a clever take on the vicissitudes of the writing life. Funny and smart, it is lit with the kind of writing that makes the reader break into a smile. "Financial Times"
Gilbert s finely wrought prose . . . teems with elaborate word plays and tests the reader s perceptiveness at every turn. "Vanity Fair"
A delicious read. New York "Daily News"
""
If the stylish brilliance of recent novels by Rachel Kushner, Jess Walter, and Peter Heller has been hinting at a new golden age of American prose, then David Gilbert s ambitious, sprawling, and altogether masterful second novel, "& Sons, " confirms it. The Daily Beast
Awork of pure genius. "The Buffalo News"
""
Extraordinary. "San Francisco Chronicle"
A witty and ultimately tragic take on the perennial subject of how the sins of the fathers are visited on their sons. There are echoes of Turgenev here, to say nothing of Jonathan Franzen and John Irving. But the music is entirely Gilbert s, and at the end of this bravura performance you'll want to give him a standing ovation. "Newsday"
Brilliant . . . weaves together the frayed threads of fame, fatherhood, family and friendship into a meditation on the blessing and curse of creativity . . . Thoughtful, farcical, acerbic and original, Gilbert s crisp writing and sinuous mind could grab and hold any reader. "Bloomberg Businessweek"
["& Sons" is] about the emotional bonds between fathers, sons and brothers the overwhelming love that can t be adequately expressed and the burden of unspoken expectations. . . . Gilbert is an inventive, emotionally perceptive writer. Associated Press
Celebrates the power of words . . . thick with wit and close observation . . . ["& Sons" is] built to last. Minneapolis "Star Tribune"
""
"& Sons" conjures a career s worth of drool-worthy fictional fiction that s so convincingly evoked, I almost recall writing a paper on it in freshman English class. "The New York Times Magazine"
[A] big, rich book . . . With wit and heart, Gilbert illuminates the complicated ways that fathers and sons misunderstand, disappoint, and love one another and how their behavior affects the women in their lives. "Real Simple"
"& Sons" is an often funny, always elegant, lingering gaze back at a world in which writers are still gods at the very center of culture. "Esquire"

"From the Hardcover edition."" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

David Gilbert is the author of the story collection "Remote Feed" and the novel "The Normals." His stories have appeared in "The New Yorker, Harper s, " "GQ, "and "Bomb." He lives in New York with his wife and three children." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A.N. Dyer is seventy-nine-years-old. As a young man he wrote a novel, I think it would be called a coming of age novel, called Ampersand. It became something of a classic in American literature, vying with Catcher in the Rye as the must-read novel for older teenagers. Dyer went on to write several other novels, though I don't think they achieved quite the cult status of Ampersand. By the time this story starts he has written nothing for several years and he is almost a recluse.

The story is narrated by Philip Topping, the son of Dyer's oldest friend, Charlie Topping. And it begins with Charlie's funeral at which Dyer is to give the eulogy. He arrives at the church with his youngest son, Andy, a seventeen-year-old boy who, we are told, was the result of a brief affair his father had with a Swedish au-pair girl. Dyer also has two much older sons, Richard and Jamie, but they are not at the funeral. Dyer sits in the front pew waiting for the ordeal of having to address the large congregation, but all he can worry about is the fact that Andy does not seem to be in the church. That is because Andy is waiting on the church steps for a twenty-four-year old girl with whom he has been conversing on the internet and whom he has arranged to meet outside the church. It is his profound wish that he will lose his virginity with the girl.

Andy's girl is late. He doesn't make it into the church. His father is desperately concerned. The eulogy is not what one might call a success, though as Dyer leaves the church he is still faced with a great many people who are eager to get him to sign their copies of Ampersand.

As I say, Andy is the youngest of the sons in the title of the novel. Richard was for many years a hopeless drug addict. But he is reformed.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I read some reviews of this book before buying it and thought it sounded like a very good read. However I don't think this book lives up to that expectation.

Some good sections, some interesting ideas (especially a more fanciful notion that arises later on through the book) but wow, these are some unlikeable people! All the main characters had very little to connect you to them - basically they're an assortment of bullies, underachievers and frustrated losers. The main narrative character is so wet and miserable that you just feel like reaching into the book and giving him a good shake! I also thought that David Gilbert's portrayal of the teenagers fell into the usual trap of writing dialogue / thoughts that sound nothing like most teenagers on earth. One minute Andy (the young son) is using lines such as "like the Met on Eightieth and Fifth, with the knights and stuff?" and then the next has thoughts such as "death existing as gesture rather than extinction"! I always find inconsistencies like that pull you straight out of the narrative and remind that this is a piece of writing rather than an immersive story. I suppose you could argue that we are seeing Andy through the prism of the narrator's writing but it still doesn't ring very true for me.

Overall I would say that it's not a terrible book but wasn't the wonderful piece of writing I was hoping for.
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Format: Hardcover
Once in a while a novel comes along which makes you realise why we read, & Sons is that novel.

On 5th Avenue at St. Patrick's Cathedral, Phillip Topping is attending his father, Charlie Topping's funeral, however this is no ordinary funeral as Charlie was a life long friend of A.N. Dyer, a renowned author whose novel Ampersand set the literary world alight and has become the 'Catcher in the Rye' of its time. Dyer now very reclusive is attending and the funeral is packed with fans hoping to claim a signature or a piece of the great man. Dependent upon his youngest son Andy, Dyer has become convinced that he will be attending another funeral very shortly, only this time it will be his own, and so he decides to bring together his 3 sons in order to sort out his affairs and right some wrongs which have happened over his and their lifetime. We witness past, present and future events through the ever present narrator Phillip Topping which will have repercussions for the Dyers and the Toppings and we soon realise that Phillip himself may not just be a casual observer and narrator within this tale.

& Sons deserves to become a modern American classic work of literature. David Gilbert's writing is tremendous, his prose has a naturalistic flow to it and is incisive, witty and just a dream to read, in fact A.N. Dyer would be proud to have produced & Sons! An absolute joy, what more can I say.

Update

This was my read of last year, and I am happy to say I have all ready seen that it might be nominated for the 2014 Booker prize. Genius!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
& Sons is a book that, in our terms, really brings New York to life. From the upmarket apartments on the Upper East and Upper West side, through the literary launch at the Frick, the over the top (and drug fuelled) limo ride across Brooklyn Bridge, the pretzel hunt through Central Park, and the mad romp around the Met... it is all there, the city at its most vivid. This is fiction set in New York, with the location as one of the key characters.

It is also a very ambitious (and challenging) work – a work that seeks to put David Gilbert into the category of Great American Novelist. It opens with a rambling eulogy that author, A N Dyer, gives at the funeral of his oldest friend, Charles Topping – and the story goes on to be told through the eyes of Charles’ son, Philip… a somewhat contrived and confusing individual with the gift of being able to move between the personae of the main characters. Other than A N (Andrew) Dyer, the three main male characters (David Gilbert doesn’t really do female..) are his two sons Richard and Jamie, and their much younger step brother, Andy. A N Dyer had written a major novel, Ampersand, at the age of 27 – and had lived off its glory for years afterwards. It had sold 45m copies. & Sons explores the impact this success of their father had upon Richard and Jamie – Richard now a recovered addict living in California, running drug rehabilitation workshops, and playing at being a screenwriter. Jamie a controversial maker of short You Tube documentaries that are in questionable taste. Andy is a teenager focused on getting laid by / with Sophie – a slightly older publishing assistant. Andy was a result (or was he?) of a brief liaison between A N Dyer and a Swedish au pair that brought down his marriage. He befriends Richard’s son, Emmett, and shows him New York.
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