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Someone at a Distance by [Whipple, Dorothy]
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Someone at a Distance Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews

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Length: 432 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

From the Publisher

Someone at a Distance (1953) was the first novel by Dorothy Whipple Persephone Books published, although it was the last she wrote. We chose it because we think it is her best, an outstandingly good novel by any standards. Apparently a 'fairly ordinary tale about the destruction of a happy marriage,' Nina Bawden wrote in her Preface, yet 'it makes compulsive reading' in its description of an 'ordinary' family, husband commuting up to town, wife at home ('Ellen was that unfashionable creature, a happy housewife'). Disaster strikes when a young French woman visits (the scenes back in France are most beautifully described, with touches of Balzac or Maupassant) and calculatingly seduces the husband. He abandons everything for her; then there is no going back.

The effect on his wife and children, on his partner at work, the way his life is destroyed in an instant of mid-life madness, all combine to create a novel of exceptional insight. This is a strongly moral book, which shows Ellen as a fulfilled yet dangerous innocent, with a touch of smugness which blinds her to her husband's vanity. Yet neither of them are more smug, or more vain, than anyone else...which is why the novel has a universal quality lifting it out of the realm of the commonplace.
Dorothy Whipple is a superb stylist: not a 'fine' writer or a Modernist but a calm intelligence in the tradition of Mrs Gaskell and George Eliot. The first sentence, with its overtones about the tragecy to come, encapsulatges the novel's quality: 'Widowed, in the house her husband had built with day and night nurseries and a music-room, as if the children would stay there for ever, instead of marrying and going off at the earliest possible moment, old Mrs North yielded one day to a long-felt desire to provide herself with company. She answered an advertisement in the personal column of The Times.'
'The prose is simple, the psychology spot on' said the Daily Telegraph, while the Spectator called it 'a very good novel indeed about the fragility and also the tenacity of love.' Someone at a Distance was in the Evening Standard bestseller list, propelled there in part by the enthusiasm of John Sandoe's bookshop in Sloane Square, which commented in its booklist: 'We have all delighted in this unjustly forgotten novel; it is well written and compelling.' Someone at a Distance has now become one of Persephone Books' quiet bestsellers.

About the Author

Born in 1893 in Lancashire, England, Dorothy Whipple wrote nine extremely successful novels, two of which were made into films. She also wrote short stories and two volumes of memoirs. She died in 1966. Nina Bawden is the celebrated author of Carrie's War, Peppermint Pig, and The Witch's Daughter, among others. A number of her works have been dramatized by BBC Children's television. She currently lives in London and Nauplion, Greece.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1392 KB
  • Print Length: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Persephone Books Ltd (14 Dec. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B006MHOBZU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #52,760 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Dorothy Whipple is yet another unjustly forgotten woman writer of the 40s and 50s. Someone at a distance is the story of an ordinary marriage. Ellen is a little complacent, a little smug about the happiness of her life and the security of her relationship with her husband, Avery. Avery is just drifting along in his comfortable job and familiar home life. The catalyst for change and tragedy in the novel is a discontented Frenchwoman Louise, who arrives as a companion to Avery's mother and insinuates herself into the family. In one memorable scene, Avery feels he is being engulfed by Louise's strong perfume, a wonderful metaphor for her effect on his life. He is too weak to fight off the effects of the perfume, and ultimately, he is too weak to fight off the consequences of his dalliance with Louise. Ellen emerges as a much stronger, more sympathetic character as she deals with the aftermath of Avery's desertion- dealing with gossips, sympathetic yet shocked relatives, and discovering a new place for herself in the changed world she inhabits. This is a beautifully written book with a strong moral sense and the ending is full of hope. Persephone have also republished Dorothy Whipple's They knew Mr Knight. If you enjoy well-written, absorbing novels with believable characters, I can't recommend Whipple's work too highly.
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Format: Paperback
This has to be one of the most quietly brilliant novels I've read in a long time.
It tells the story of the most perfect happy family destroyed by one foolish mistake and the arts of a young French woman. It's simply heart-breaking and can make the reader, by turns, fume with anger and cry with sadness!
Dorothy Whipple's writing is without embellishments but is able to grip the reader until the very end. Louise releases a Pandora's Box full of evil and pain upon the happy North family...but at the bottom of the box was of course...hope. This is what Whipple leaves us with and it's perfect.
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Format: Paperback
Continuing with my run of Persephone titles (following the delightful Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day), Someone at a Distance lives up to the high standard I have come to expect from Persephone. Dorothy Whipple puts a unique spin on the all too familiar tale of a husband going off with a younger woman - leaving his wife and children to fend for themselves. Vividly imagined, the characters' inner dialogues and outward behaviour as they react to the events unfolding around them are both realistic and insightful. The wife's response, as she struggles to cope and find new accomodation and work, is especially moving.
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Format: Paperback
I don't know how she does it! All of her books are so well written and yet so readable. Whenever I retell the story of any of her novels to anyone, they don't sound that gripping, but it is quite literally the way she tells them that makes them such page-turners!
She draws a vivid and convincing picture of her characters making them real from the first to the last page and beyond. I'm still cross with Avery to be honest. I don't think I can forgive him just yet.
A nice cup of tea, a slice of Victoria Sponge and a Whipple in hand - life doesn't get much better.
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Format: Paperback
This is a book my bookgroup decided to read, following a fellow member's recommendation. I am so pleased I had the opportunity and pleasure to read this book and discover the writings of an excellent albeit underrated female novelist.
From the beginning, Whipple's writing is engaging, constructive and begs you not to put the book down.
The story is gripping without sensational twists but a real time version of a family disintegrating due to a foolish, vain and weak husband. I agree with other reviewers that say that the 'heroine' comes out very well at the end of the novel since she has 'grown'.
My only mistake is that I read the foreward which revealed a synopsis of the novel before I had read it. It rather spoilt some of the surprises, so don't read it until you've finished the novel!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I loved this book and was really sorry to finish it. The writing style is quite ordinary, but Dorothy Whipple's depiction of happy family life destroyed by momentary temptation is so perceptive that it is totally absorbing. The characters are well depicted so that I felt I really knew them, particularly Ellen, the complacently contented and ultimately wronged wife, and Louise, a predatory French girl who follows her own selfish ends without consideration for the feelings of others. The husband, Avery, may be attractive, but he's also weak and easily led to the point that you want to shake him until he comes to his senses. I couldn't imagine how the book would end, but you have to keep reading to find out.

This is an absolute gem from Persephone Classics. If you enjoy stories about relationships and how they develop and founder, and about the power of love, then do read this. You'll love it!
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Format: Paperback
'Someone at a Distance' is a novel I found utterly compelling from the very first line. Dorothy Whipple draws the reader in with such assurance yet the style of her prose is both understated and unpretentious. At the same time, one comes upon certain unexpectedly evocative passages which belie the straightforwardness of the novel as a whole. I was particularly struck by the following:

'If we could be seen thinking, we would show blown bright one moment, dark the next, like embers; subject to every passing word and thought of our own or other people's, mostly other people's.' (p.181)

How elegant and perceptive! I perceived some resemblances with another favourite novelist of that period, Elizabeth Bowen. Though these writers depart in style, they share a thematic preoccupation with the effect of environment on state of mind, the concept of home and the fragility of this idea. Similar existential concerns run through this novel, subdued at first though felt more palpably with the dispossession of Ellen and her children. The description of a home following the death or departure of the main resident as 'dead' chimes with Bowen's rendering of domestic space in her work.
The age-old art of story-telling is often underestimated these days when narrative high-jinks are the vogue. Whipple reminds one of the pleasure of complete immersion in a story and within an unfamiliar world which is simultaneously familiar in many ways. The Norths are, above all, an ordinary family and Ellen is an ordinary mother. Having finished the novel (within the space of a day and a half, I might add), I felt at such a loss that I immediately procured a copy of 'They Knew Mr. Knight'. This impulsiveness is testament to Whipple's skill as a storyteller and her power to move. This novel was, in all sincerity, a pleasure.
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