Quantity:1
Some Cities has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by positivenoise
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Available for immediate dispatch. Ships from UK.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£2.97
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: Amazon
Add to Basket
£2.99
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: mrtopseller
Add to Basket
£2.99
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: Renegade Sports Group Limited
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £4.99

Some Cities CD+DVD, Box set, Limited Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews

Price: £2.50 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 3 left in stock.
Sold by Discount CDs and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
47 new from £0.01 11 used from £0.01 4 collectible from £6.49
£2.50 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 3 left in stock. Sold by Discount CDs and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's Doves Store


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Some Cities
  • +
  • Kingdom of Rust
  • +
  • The Last Broadcast
Total price: £8.51
Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Audio CD (21 Feb. 2005)
  • Limited Edition edition
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: CD+DVD, Box set, Limited Edition
  • Label: Heavenly
  • ASIN: B00077OYDA
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 148,508 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Some Cities
  2. Black And White Town
  3. Almost Forgot Myself
  4. Snowden
  5. The Storm
  6. Walk In Fire
  7. One Of These Days
  8. Someday Soon
  9. Shadows Of Salford
  10. Sky Starts Falling
  11. Ambition

Disc: 2

  1. 'Making of...' Documentary "Cities Under Construction"
  2. Photo gallery
  3. Black And White Town (Director's Cut - Video)

Product Description

Product Description

The bonus DVD features a short film (approx 11 mins) of the 'making of' the album titled "Cities Under Construction", plus a photo gallery (set to an exclusive album instrumental) and the Director's Cut of the video for Black And White Town by acclaimed Director Lynne Ramsay.

Amazon.co.uk

Doves return with a follow-up to The Last Broadcast that, unexpectedly, is something of a concept album. Some Cities builds on that titular theme throughout the course of its wintry--and, at times, monolithic--citysongs.

First single "Black and White Town" is in good company here: Doves' distinctive jangling and fractured chords also feature in "One Of These Days" and, most impressively, the hope-tinged northern dirge that is "Shadows Of Salford". But the most interesting cut here is "The Storm", which uses an old Ryuichi Sakamoto string sample to great effect, pitching Doves into compelling new territory that could well be explored in the future.

Elsewhere Doves' trademark soaring, epic sound is retained intact from Lost Souls and The Last Broadcast. Doves repeat their peerless use of a thumping kick to propel songs such as "Black and White Town" and "Sky Starts Falling" to their blistered crescendos, all the while keeping a uniquely dynamic sound that is exclusively Doves.--Jonti Davies

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This is my first taste of Doves, and "Some Cities" has certainly proved an enjoyable album to listen to over the past week (and perhaps, even, for a few weeks to come).
"Some Cities" opens its namesake album, and is fairly enjoyable even if it doesn't aspire to much. It then merges into the next track - "Black & White Town" - which has a pacey piano-riff and a thumping drum that sends it along nicely - this is arguably the best track on the album and it's no surprise it has been released as the first single. "Almost Forgot Myself" maintains the upbeat start to the album and has a 60s feel and proabably owes something to the bands of that era such as The Kinks. Snowden - which looks to be the second single from "Some Cities" - has twinkly guitar riffs and blaring oriental-style bursts which build up to the song's climax, ending in a climbing mountain of sound which justifies the track's name.
Here, a break from the summery beginning comes in the form of "The Storm", built around a movie-score sample with strings-infested melancholy that works rather well, and is certainly one of my favourite tracks on the album.
The album then returns to its previous state - albeit with a slightly darker side - with the songs "Walk In Fire" and "One Of These Days", the latter sounding like the perfect anthem for a summer festival. "Someday Soon" mixes somber vocals with a hopeful guitar/flute-like instrument riff to good effect. "Shadows of Salford" is a favourite of mine but is probably not very accessible - sounds depressing on the first listen, but creates a ghostly atmosphere with a creepy piano, vulnerable vocals and bursts of 'ooh! ooh!' that collaborates to make a somewhat unsettling but pleasant song. Hmmm....
Read more ›
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
There is so much going on that on a simple background listen one would miss. I suppose generally it's a chilled album but my body has been discovered to be uncontrollably jigging to the groove. Grooves which tend to be constant in structure with only slight alterations along the way.

I'm now gonna go against all that I've just written and say the word "Epic".

Songs average at 4.30 and, from a recording and mixing point of view, cover a massive range of styles and techniques. A fantastic use of room sounds (I've been told they recorded a lot of the album in an old church (the sleeve states that it was recorded and mixed in 10 different locations!!!) and computer (or otherwise) effects.

I find myself occasionally listening and waiting for the next effect to slip in `cos it always sounds so freakin' ace!!

This is my first time with this band and I can highly recommend it as a starting point. After this I got all their other albums and discovered many delights on the way.

I'd recommend this album to anyone with a cultured and wide range in tastes. It's not too intrusive and has a great mixture of sad and happy songs, leaving you feeling ... well ... alive!

This album will be in and out of my player for the rest of my life. And I'll always find something new!

Conclusion:
A lovely chunk of ear candy - eat it NOW!
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I just listened to the entire album on NME and, having already fallen in love with "Black and White Town," I am now chomping at the bit to buy "Some Cities" when it hits the States. In addition to "Black," my favorite tracks are "Snowden" and the gorgeous "One of These Days." This is an epic album from start to finish.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
The problem that Doves will have the rest of their career is that every album they put out will be measured against their brilliant debut, Lost Souls. When I first listened to Some Cities, I thought "Hmm, not Lost Souls, not even The Last Broadcast." But like all Doves albums, you have to keep listening. You probably don't "get" the album until you have listened to more than five or six times all the way through. But once you do "get" it, then you keep playing it and playing it and playing it. The electronic atmospherics so prevalent on Lost Souls and to an extent on The Last Broadcast are toned down here. There aren't as many radio friendly tracks like "Catch the Sun," "Pounding," or "Caught by the River." But what is here is very solid. It's also varied. You've got Northern Soul influences on "Black and White Town," bluesy guitar playing on "Almost Forgot Myself," and the Doves' penchant for rockabilly on "Walk In Fire." But I must reserve special mention for three tracks in particular: "Snowden" with its electronically distorted string symphonic riff; the flute-accented 70s prog rock of "Someday Soon" (my favorite track); and the moody "Ambition" which relied on the reverberations of a Scottish cathedral where they recorded the track. There is so much variety here that even if you tire of listening to the whole album, you'll be drawn back to individual tracks. Doves are absolutely essential and the only band prepared to take the mantle of Mancunian musical elder statesmen when New Order finally pass from the stage.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This is my first taste of Doves, and "Some Cities" has certainly proved an enjoyable album to listen to over the past week (and perhaps, even, for a few weeks to come).
"Some Cities" opens its namesake album, and is fairly enjoyable even if it doesn't aspire to much. It then merges into the next track - "Black & White Town" - which has a pacey piano-riff and a thumping drum that sends it along nicely - this is arguably the best track on the album and it's no surprise it has been released as the first single. "Almost Forgot Myself" maintains the upbeat start to the album and has a 60s feel and proabably owes something to the bands of that era such as The Kinks. Snowden - which looks to be the second single from "Some Cities" - has twinkly guitar riffs and blaring oriental-style bursts which build up to the song's climax, ending in a climbing mountain of sound which justifies the track's name.
Here, a break from the summery beginning comes in the form of "The Storm", built around a movie-score sample with strings-infested melancholy that works rather well, and is certainly one of my favourite tracks on the album.
The album then returns to its previous state - albeit with a slightly darker side - with the songs "Walk In Fire" and "One Of These Days", the latter sounding like the perfect anthem for a summer festival. "Someday Soon" mixes somber vocals with a hopeful guitar/flute-like instrument riff to good effect. "Shadows of Salford" is a favourite of mine but is probably not very accessible - sounds depressing on the first listen, but creates a ghostly atmosphere with a creepy piano, vulnerable vocals and bursts of 'ooh! ooh!' that collaborates to make a somewhat unsettling but pleasant song. Hmmm....
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback