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Solaris Rising 2: The New Solaris Book of Science Fiction (Indigo Prime) Paperback – 11 Apr 2013

4.0 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Rebellion (11 April 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1781080879
  • ISBN-13: 978-1781080870
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 271,722 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

Ian Whates is a director of both the Science-Fiction Writers Association and the British Science-Fiction Association. He is also the proprietor and editor of NewCon Press. He has written two novels and edited three anthologies for Solaris.


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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
nice collection with a broad reach.
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Format: Paperback
Cue bragging; I, or rather my site Terror Tree, is quoted on the inside cover of this book. I said, and I do remember saying this, "This is a must buy anthology for SF fans. Be ready; you are in for a treat." The first book was a truly great collection of SF. And you know what? Solaris Rising 2 has topped the first book!
Featuring a host of prolific SFF writers currently working in the genre, from a diverse range of genders and cultural backgrounds, this second volume (there is an earlier ebook Solaris Rising 1.5) starts with a bang and doesn't let up. Of the 19 stories, there was only 1 I couldn't get on with, which is an amazing success rate as far as I'm concerned.
The collection starts with the story 'Tom' by award winning author Paul Cornell. In this story we encounter the amphibian alien race the Carviv, in a first encounter story with combines fear, love and a terrific sensuality. In Nancy Kress' story 'More' a woman is released from prison having served 15 years for terrorist actions in a world in which 'the rich, secure behind the tech of the dome(s) will never have to be aware of the homeless poor again'. In James Lovegrove's story, he interjects the narrative of a character, Martin's Dad with the AI Network Johnny Nimbus, as a space ark is being prepared for a small percentage of humanity who will head into the stars and survive, whilst those remaining on earth will die. The interjections by Johnny are wonderfully ironic. In 'Whatever Skin You Wear' by Eugie Foster, we find a heartwarming tale of love offset by society's obsession with beauty. 'The Time Gun' by Nick Harkaway is a great little time travel story.
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Format: Paperback
In 2011 Solaris revived the Solaris Book of New Science Fiction series with Solaris Rising. I greatly admired the book and really enjoyed it. In my conclusion to the review I said I hoped that the book would be a success so there would be more instalments in the series. Evidently it was, as here I am with a review for Solaris Rising 2. The collection of authors is quite different from the last one with some names I wouldn't have expected in an SF setting, such as Adrian Tchaikovsky.

There were two stories that didn't really work for me, mostly due to their ending. Robert Reed's Bonds started of interesting enough telling the story of a young man with serious mental issues who becomes a cult idol due to a spurious theory about the nature of the universe. I liked the tale but at one point the story turns from a tale about an elaborate con into something that might actually be true, at which point Reed lost me and by the ending the story just fell flat for me. Martin Sketchley's The Circle of Least Confusion consisted of interesting concepts, lost me with the dual storylines and the contrived way of getting the gadget in the hands of the protagonist. I also had a hard time relating to the way Kate, the female main character, didn't tell her partner she was pregnant when she found out. That's a completely personal reaction though, as it's completely opposite of my own experiences in that regard. The ending also felt rather abrupt and I was left with questions regarding the fate of the alien sniper, who featured in the story.

Even though this anthology is meant to show the variety and scope of SF, there are some themes that repeat, such as time travel, the malleability of history, and the interplay between humanity and technology.
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By Clare O'Beara TOP 500 REVIEWER on 25 May 2013
Format: Paperback
Science fiction anthology with a variety of tales to suit a variety of tastes. In 'Tom' by Paul Cornell, marine aliens arrive and make themselves at home, much like dolphins that can live on land too, and we go and clean up the seas.
Gated communities live expensively in domes while poor people and eco-terrorists gather outside; self-replicating nano-machines which gobble up an oil spill and just keep going threaten Earth and for some reason all the people with autism are to be sent away and saved.

Some stories are very old themes, like people who meet up in online game lives and never in RL, and time travel, and a spaceship disaster. If anything has changed, it is the language and assumed technology making them more modern in feel. People studying Lincoln via time travel add the data to Wikipedia. A forest has turned semi-sentient and defends itself against people due to genetic manipulation; references are made to China's one child policy, the Sentient Equal Rights Act, to Hillary Clinton.

Norman Spinrad is the best-known name, and he contributes a brief story about interstellar travel, a narration of a science and a journey but sadly lacking any characters. Other contributors include an Indian woman with a PhD in physics and a woman who runs a witchcrafting supply store in England. Several authors have been nominated for various SF awards, some have won, and Allen Steele we are told in 2001, testified before the U.S. House of Representatives in hearings regarding the future of space exploration. SF has always tried to imagine and address challenges for us, and SOLARIS RISING, edited by Ian Whates, is good dip-into reading, though no tale is long enough to address a subject in any length. I didn't take to some of the tales or styles, but we're all different.
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