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The Society of Imaginary Friends (The Conjurors Series Book 1) by [Pham, Kristen]
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The Society of Imaginary Friends (The Conjurors Series Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
Book 1 of 4 in The Conjurors Series (4 Book Series)

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Length: 305 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Age Level: 9 - 16 Grade Level: 4 - 10

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Product description

About the Author

Kristen Pham lives for really great fudge, rollercoasters, and exploring new worlds via fiction. She lives in San Jose, CA with her son (Jake), daughter (Clara) and husband, where she eagerly waits for Jake and Clara to turn 11 and receive their invitations to Hogwarts. Her childhood memories of adventures with her imaginary friends inspired her YA fantasy series, THE CONJURORS.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2413 KB
  • Print Length: 305 pages
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004RUXQGE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #15,003 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Fantastic book. Downloaded to my eight year old's kindle for bedtime reading. She thoroughly enjoyed this book and finished the entire thing within two evenings. It was well written and engaging for her age bracket. Best of all it was a free download - fantastic! I would definitely recommend this book.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I had an imaginary tormentor. He was made up by my parents whenever we would go on holiday to Porta Pollensa. He was `The Vampire Man’. He lived in a house with round windows, and my parents told me that, if I didn’t behave, he’d feast on my blood. When I go there now, I still cross to the other side of the road to avoid that house. I’m a 27 year-old man. – By Toby Manhire In The Internaut

My niece was around 6 years old but could talk really well. She grew quite fond of this imaginary character named Donney or Donee. She said he would only show up whenever Mommy and Daddy went to sleep. He said she would play with her and s***. Well, one night she was in the living room resting on the couch when I walked in the door. She shot right up looked at me with the most dead but evil filled stare ever and, I quote, said, “Donney, no! Don’t hurt him! No!” then went back to a comatose that would be followed by screams of horror. This is where it gets real interesting. One day I was sitting watching the television when she looked at me and said, “Sometimes, when I’m playing with Donney, we take of our clothes an jump on the bed.” I decided to ask her what Donney looks like (no, I didn’t have a clue what I was ******* doing) and this is exactly what she said, ” He’s tall, with black and red skin. He has worms crawling out of his eyes. He also has black teeth and black hair. He wears black clothes.” – An Ask Reddit reader

What is a girl to do, when her imaginary friend is plotting to kill her? When we first meet Valerie this is a very serious consideration for her – because Sanguina, the imaginary “friend” that has tracked her all her life isn’t a friend at all. And she is setting up Valerie’s foster brother, Daniel, to die.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars 86 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great YA novel with wonderful characters 10 Aug. 2014
By Leiah - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I had an imaginary tormentor. He was made up by my parents whenever we would go on holiday to Porta Pollensa. He was `The Vampire Man'. He lived in a house with round windows, and my parents told me that, if I didn't behave, he'd feast on my blood.
When I go there now, I still cross to the other side of the road to avoid that house. I'm a 27 year-old man. - By Toby Manhire In The Internaut

My niece was around 6 years old but could talk really well. She grew quite fond of this imaginary character named Donney or Donee. She said he would only show up whenever Mommy and Daddy went to sleep. He said she would play with her and s***. Well, one night she was in the living room resting on the couch when I walked in the door. She shot right up looked at me with the most dead but evil filled stare ever and, I quote, said, "Donney, no! Don't hurt him! No!" then went back to a comatose that would be followed by screams of horror. This is where it gets real interesting. One day I was sitting watching the television when she looked at me and said, "Sometimes, when I'm playing with Donney, we take of our clothes an jump on the bed." I decided to ask her what Donney looks like (no, I didn't have a clue what I was ******* doing) and this is exactly what she said, " He's tall, with black and red skin. He has worms crawling out of his eyes. He also has black teeth and black hair. He wears black clothes." - An Ask Reddit reader

What is a girl to do, when her imaginary friend is plotting to kill her? When we first meet Valerie this is a very serious consideration for her - because Sanguina, the imaginary "friend" that has tracked her all her life isn't a friend at all. And she is setting up Valerie's foster brother, Daniel, to die. Sanguina, Valerie's very own personal tormentor, who doctors considered proof that Valerie was truly, certifiably schizophrenic. And to make things worse, every time Sanguina shows up, Valerie has a seizure - and now, one more of these seizures and Valerie will die.

But things are about to get much worse - because Sanguina has a partner - and he is very, very real.

Pham has made me eat my words. Yep. I have said repeatedly that I am not a `Young Adult' book reader. I have found that there is a lot more `teenager' in `teenage' books than I can handle. Well, imagine that! LOL Really, when you think about it, excitability and end-of-the-world histrionics is what being a teenager is all about, and the proliferation of `Young Adult' books on the market today is, in my mind, a wonderful thing. It not only encourages teens to read, but gives them an outlet, an ability for even the shyest to realize that they are not all alone, that what is happening to their minds and bodies is natural.

So, as I was saying, Pham has changed my mind about not enjoying YA with her book, The Society of Imaginary Friends. Yes, there is a YA feel overall, with it's compliment of temper tantrums and attitude. But this is a lot more, a testament to the strength of a young girl and her friends as they begin a fight which ultimately will become a war - a war of magic and terror, of hatred and pain which will change the fate of not one world, but two - and possibly that of the universe itself.

There is much to like about Pham's first in The Conjurors series. The characters, Valerie, Thai, Henry and Cyrus are all well written, well-developed characters. They are brave, but not too brave. Smart, but not too smart - they feel real. Through heartache and joy, they work together to do what needs to be done in order to not only survive, but to thrive. Society is a book filled with magic and wonder - and a lot of terror and madness as well.

I received this book from the publisher in return for an honest review. All thoughts are my own. Highly recommended.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing World and Interesting Characters. 31 Jan. 2016
By jcat - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a good choice for a younger reader who loves Fantasy. The world of magic (Globe), which was secluded from Earth, has a lot of potential. The writing was good, and the descriptive scenes were well done.

It took me a while to warm up to the characters at first. I found it hard to connect with them. But eventually their personalities won me over. I remember thinking that the Unicorn was a bit over the top, but ended up respecting her place in the story. Although there's much more to the story, I'm glad that it didn't end in the middle of an action scene with a cliffhanger.

My only issue was the flow of the plot. It seemed a bit choppy and wasn't as smooth as it should have been. Because of this, it didn't keep my interest properly. I'm not sure if I'll continue with the series, but this was an OK read for me.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 3.5 stars- what could be wonderfult for YAs is not necesarily great for adults 4 July 2016
By Cissa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is very much a YA novel, aimed- at my best guess- at ages 10-14, and probably mostly girls.

I remember being that age, and the undercurrent of feeling misunderstood and unappreciated that went with it. This book revels in that, and in fantastic events proving that YES! You ARE that special!

Honestly, this is a message that could be life-saving for kids in the agegroup that are in horrible circumstances, like our heroine is. The aspects of this novel that make it flawed from an adult perspective are probably the ones that will bring the most comfort to readers of its agegroup.

The character development was scanty, the secondary characters simplistic, and the plot badly paced- way too much EXCITEMENT with few downtimes. The heroine going from a neglected orphan to one of the most powerful magicians EVER would be gratifying to anyone who identified with her. At the point at which the novel ends, it's not at all clear why the Big Bads are being Big Bads- except that they are BAD.

I can't even really talk about the worldbuilding, because it is too scant. Things happen because MAGIC! Ice castles are both chilly to live in and warm and comfy! There are Rules- except when there are not! etc.

I think some kids in the target age group will like this novel a lot, partly because of its flaws (seen as an adult reader, and not the target audience).

Consider giving it to your disaffected tween or young teen; don't read it as an adult.

I received this novel in exchange for writing an honest review, possibly received via Kindle First.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An adventure of the best sort 19 April 2016
By smeva - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this story. It was full of suspense and adventure and takes place on earth and then on the planet where the society trains. This book is great for adults, teens, and even advanced middle school readers. The main character, Valerie, is living in her own private hell in foster homes and is trying her best to survive when she is suddenly pulled into a different world. She discovers secrets about herself and meets people who want to help her. There is suspense, drama, action, adventure, friendship, and even different worlds! You will be left wanting more! I loved that Valerie is a misfit and an orphan and she's trying to find out how to fit in as the story moves forward she learns about the value of friendship .I am excited to continue to read this series and see where it leads Valerie and her friends.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Imagination abounds in this YA series opener! 23 April 2016
By Britt Holewinski - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
4.5 Stars of out 5

Valerie Diaz, an orphan shuffled from foster home to foster home has a secret: she sees imaginary people that are so real to her that she’s classified as a schizophrenic by medical doctors. But these imaginaries are real, though maybe not on earth. Some of them are to help her, while others are most definitely not. And once Valerie is whisked away into a world beyond earth to the Globe, where her best imaginary friend, Cyrus, and others are real, it turns out that Valerie has magic powers of her own. Using these powers, however, is actually killing her.

The story might be fantasy, the locations on earth are well-researched by the author, a quality I value in books. I enjoyed the different methods for traveling between earth and the Globe, and the colorful descriptions of this magical world. Though sometimes I thought that Valerie was often fighting for things that I didn’t quite understand, she’s a plucky heroine who is hard not to love.

This is an interesting premise for a YA novel, and I enjoyed the idea of a world where the things you foster and hold onto during childhood—i.e. imaginary friends—end up being the reality and provide the set-up for the next books in Pham’s creative series. I look forward to reading the next one!
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