Buy Used
£0.18
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Pearlydewdrops
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Light shelf wear to edges of cover and/or spine. Otherwise new and unread. Shipped from the UK within 1-2 business days of order being placed. Goods inserted into heavy duty cardboard envelopes. Sent by Royal Mail.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Snows of Yesteryear (New York Review Books Classics) Paperback – 7 May 2009

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£0.18

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
click to open popover

Special offers and product promotions


Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 312 pages
  • Publisher: NYRB Classics; Main edition (7 May 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590172817
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590172810
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2 x 20.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 351,726 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

"Von Rezzori's best-known novel, "Memoirs of an Anti-Semite," and his recent memoir, "The Snows of Yesteryear," were works of sly, silky lyricism filled with sharp detail and a deft, ironic moral weight. Above all they offered marvelous character-portraits in prose, with the novel wryly evoking the women who shaped its narrator's sensual and intellectual life and the memoir giving an indelible account of von Rezzori's tragicomically dysfunctional family as it weathered the cataclysms of a war-stricken Europe." -"Washington Post"
"The Snows of Yesteryear" "leads into a world now irretrievably lost, its values blown away by World War I and its fortures wrecked by the inflationary '20s...Strong material, then; and Rezorri follows this family back with a fine disdain for sentiment, a transparency of feeling, an acid sense of humor and a vigilant eye for nuances of love and indifference, language, landscape and class behavior. It is not a young man's (or a moralist's) book. But it is intensely moving and contains, in its winding and ironic cadences, not a slack sentence." -"Time "magazine
"Writing in lyrical, allusive prose-elegantly translated from the German by H. F. Broch de Rothermann-Mr. von Rezzori uses his portraits...to create a book that is, at once, an autobiography and a picture of a vanished age..."The Snows of Yesteryear" reveals its author's rich pictorial imagination, his seemingly total recall, his gift for revealing character through anecdotes colored by memory...His book remains both an elegiac tribute to a receding past and a testament to the redemptive powers of memory-a family photography album, beautifully translated into words." -Michiko Kakutani, "The New YorkTimes"
""The Snows of Yesteryear" is a classic which bears comparison in its artistic integrity with Nabakov's "Speak, Memory" and Sarte's "Les Mots,"" -"The Independent" (London)
""The Snows of Yesteryear" is autobiography as portraiture...Each portrait is a miniature of the Bukovinian past." -"The New York Review of Books"
"If any individual life could encapsulate the geographic and psychic dislocation that has been the central experience of the 20th century, that life might be Gregor von Rezzori's...Rezzori has explored the consequences of this century's disruptions in a series of remarkable books..."The Death of My Brother Abel, Memoirs of an Anti-Semite, "and "The Snows of Yesteryear,"" -"Newsday"
"["Memoirs of an Anti-Semite" and "The Snows of Yesteryear" are] works sly, silky lyricism filled with sharp detail and a deft, ironic moral weight. Above all they offered marvelous character-portraits in prose." -"The Washington Post"
""The Snows of Yesteryear"'s five 'portraits' add up to a nonfiction Bildungsroman...an eclectic cultural smorgasbord almost comical in its complications...Shrewdly dovetailing psychological observation and factual background in five marvelous interdependent narratives, Rezzori blends public and personal history with brilliance and aplomb. Praise should go to translator H. F. Broch de Rothermann for rendering Rezzori's German into such seductively lyrical English prose." -"The Seattle Times"
"The weight of history lies heavily on the people of Central Europe; this powerful memoir shows us how painful that weight can be." -"Newsday"
"Dazzling prose, humane insights and good humor...[Rezzori] has created, not simply recorded amemoir of growing up in the linguistic and political no-man's-land of interbellum central Europe." -"Boston Globe"
"The iconoclastic author of "Memoirs of an Anti-Semite" and "The Death of My Brother Abel" mulls over his childhood. Like Elias Canetti, a modern Homer of Central European aristocracy, Rezzori frames the past like a classicist, feels it like a tormented youth." -"Philadelphia Inquirer"
""The Snows of Yesteryear" is a classic which bears comparison in its artistic integrity with Nabokov's "Speak, Memory" and Sartre's "Les Mots,"" -"The Independent" (London)

-One of those rare and lovely books that defy category. Fiction and non-fiction meet in the precision and quality of Rezzori's prose, in his passion for the perfect detail, and in his power to capture the reader's heart.--Alan Furst
-Von Rezzori's best-known novel, Memoirs of an Anti-Semite, and his recent memoir, The Snows of Yesteryear, were works of sly, silky lyricism filled with sharp detail and a deft, ironic moral weight. Above all they offered marvelous character-portraits in prose, with the novel wryly evoking the women who shaped its narrator's sensual and intellectual life and the memoir giving an indelible account of von Rezzori's tragicomically dysfunctional family as it weathered the cataclysms of a war-stricken Europe.- -Washington Post
The Snows of Yesteryear -leads into a world now irretrievably lost, its values blown away by World War I and its fortures wrecked by the inflationary '20s...Strong material, then; and Rezorri follows this family back with a fine disdain for sentiment, a transparency of feeling, an acid sense of humor and a vigilant eye for nuances of love and indifference, language, landscape and class behavior. It is not a young man's (or a moralist's) book. But it is intensely moving and contains, in its winding and ironic cadences, not a slack sentence.- -Time magazine
-Writing in lyrical, allusive prose-elegantly translated from the German by H. F. Broch de Rothermann-Mr. von Rezzori uses his portraits...to create a book that is, at once, an autobiography and a picture of a vanished age...The Snows of Yesteryear reveals its author's rich pictorial imagination, his seemingly total recall, his gift for revealing character through anecdotes colored by memory...His book remains both an elegiac tribute to a receding past and a testament to the redemptive powers of memory-a family photography album, beautifully translated into words.- -Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times
-The Snows of Yesteryear is a classic which bears comparison in its artistic integrity with Nabakov's Speak, Memory and Sarte's Les Mots.- -The Independent (London)
-The Snows of Yesteryear is autobiography as portraiture...Each portrait is a miniature of the Bukovinian past.- -The New York Review of Books
-If any individual life could encapsulate the geographic and psychic dislocation that has been the central experience of the 20th century, that life might be Gregor von Rezzori's...Rezzori has explored the consequences of this century's disruptions in a series of remarkable books...The Death of My Brother Abel, Memoirs of an Anti-Semite, and The Snows of Yesteryear.- -Newsday
-[Memoirs of an Anti-Semite and The Snows of Yesteryear are] works sly, silky lyricism filled with sharp detail and a deft, ironic moral weight. Above all they offered marvelous character-portraits in prose.- -The Washington Post
-The Snows of Yesteryear's five 'portraits' add up to a nonfiction Bildungsroman...an eclectic cultural smorgasbord almost comical in its complications...Shrewdly dovetailing psychological observation and factual background in five marvelous interdependent narratives, Rezzori blends public and personal history with brilliance and aplomb. Praise should go to translator H. F. Broch de Rothermann for rendering Rezzori's German into such seductively lyrical English prose.- -The Seattle Times
-The weight of history lies heavily on the people of Central Europe; this powerful memoir shows us how painful that weight can be.- -Newsday
-Dazzling prose, humane insights and good humor...[Rezzori] has created, not simply recorded a memoir of growing up in the linguistic and political no-man's-land of interbellum central Europe.- -Boston Globe
-The iconoclastic author of Memoirs of an Anti-Semite and The Death of My Brother Abel mulls over his childhood. Like Elias Canetti, a modern Homer of Central European aristocracy, Rezzori frames the past like a classicist, feels it like a tormented youth.- -Philadelphia Inquirer
-The Snows of Yesteryear is a classic which bears comparison in its artistic integrity with Nabokov's Speak, Memory and Sartre's Les Mots.- -The Independent (London)

"One of those rare and lovely books that defy category. Fiction and non-fiction meet in the precision and quality of Rezzori's prose, in his passion for the perfect detail, and in his power to capture the reader's heart."-Alan Furst

"Von Rezzori's best-known novel, Memoirs of an Anti-Semite, and his recent memoir, The Snows of Yesteryear, were works of sly, silky lyricism filled with sharp detail and a deft, ironic moral weight. Above all they offered marvelous character-portraits in prose, with the novel wryly evoking the women who shaped its narrator's sensual and intellectual life and the memoir giving an indelible account of von Rezzori's tragicomically dysfunctional family as it weathered the cataclysms of a war-stricken Europe." -Washington Post

The Snows of Yesteryear "leads into a world now irretrievably lost, its values blown away by World War I and its fortures wrecked by the inflationary '20s...Strong material, then; and Rezorri follows this family back with a fine disdain for sentiment, a transparency of feeling, an acid sense of humor and a vigilant eye for nuances of love and indifference, language, landscape and class behavior. It is not a young man's (or a moralist's) book. But it is intensely moving and contains, in its winding and ironic cadences, not a slack sentence." -Time magazine

"Writing in lyrical, allusive prose-elegantly translated from the German by H. F. Broch de Rothermann-Mr. von Rezzori uses his portraits...to create a book that is, at once, an autobiography and a picture of a vanished age...The Snows of Yesteryear reveals its author's rich pictorial imagination, his seemingly total recall, his gift for revealing character through anecdotes colored by memory...His book remains both an elegiac tribute to a receding past and a testament to the redemptive powers of memory-a family photography album, beautifully translated into words." -Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

"The Snows of Yesteryear is a classic which bears comparison in its artistic integrity with Nabakov's Speak, Memory and Sarte's Les Mots." -The Independent (London)

"The Snows of Yesteryear is autobiography as portraiture...Each portrait is a miniature of the Bukovinian past." -The New York Review of Books

"If any individual life could encapsulate the geographic and psychic dislocation that has been the central experience of the 20th century, that life might be Gregor von Rezzori's...Rezzori has explored the consequences of this century's disruptions in a series of remarkable books...The Death of My Brother Abel, Memoirs of an Anti-Semite, and The Snows of Yesteryear." -Newsday

"[Memoirs of an Anti-Semite and The Snows of Yesteryear are] works sly, silky lyricism filled with sharp detail and a deft, ironic moral weight. Above all they offered marvelous character-portraits in prose." -The Washington Post

"The Snows of Yesteryear's five 'portraits' add up to a nonfiction Bildungsroman...an eclectic cultural smorgasbord almost comical in its complications...Shrewdly dovetailing psychological observation and factual background in five marvelous interdependent narratives, Rezzori blends public and personal history with brilliance and aplomb. Praise should go to translator H. F. Broch de Rothermann for rendering Rezzori's German into such seductively lyrical English prose." -The Seattle Times

"The weight of history lies heavily on the people of Central Europe; this powerful memoir shows us how painful that weight can be." -Newsday

"Dazzling prose, humane insights and good humor...[Rezzori] has created, not simply recorded a memoir of growing up in the linguistic and political no-man's-land of interbellum central Europe." -Boston Globe

"The iconoclastic author of Memoirs of an Anti-Semite and The Death of My Brother Abel mulls over his childhood. Like Elias Canetti, a modern Homer of Central European aristocracy, Rezzori frames the past like a classicist, feels it like a tormented youth." -Philadelphia Inquirer

"The Snows of Yesteryear is a classic which bears comparison in its artistic integrity with Nabokov's Speak, Memory and Sartre's Les Mots." -The Independent (London)

About the Author

Gregor von Rezzori (1914-1998) studied at the University of Vienna and for a time lived in Bucharest. Von Rezzori's books include Tales from Maghrebinia, Oedipus Triumphs at Stalingrad, The Hussar, The Death of My Brother Abel, and Anecdotage. He lived with his wife in a village near Florence, Italy, until his death. His Memoirs of an Anti-Semite was reissued by NYRB Classics in 2007.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland, in 1945. He is the author of many novels, including The Book of Evidence, The Untouchable, and Eclipse. Banville's novel The Sea was awarded the 2005 Man Booker Prize. On occasion he writes under the pen name Benjamin Black.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Another book i found in a bargain bin, left unread for years, and now think is a classic. It's a memoir of the author's childhood and early youth in Eastern Europe, not too promising an idea, perhaps, but it works out to be a powerful read. Von Rezzori was born i think during or just after the First World War, a turning point; one of his themes is how the old, cultured world of Europe, a world of individuals and vivid life, broke apart and slowly became the machine-age we now so miserably inhabit. His parents are eccentric and, in their terrible way, magnificent, and certainly couldn't easily exist in our age. i finished this nostalgic for the vanished world, the world of Proust (who likewise, dying just after WWI, writes of a world that is dying), of larger, stranger humanity, realer than ours.
1 Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this essentially autobiographical volume immediately after An Ermine in Czernopol and Memoirs of an Anti-Semite. Those are Von Rezzori's two novels touching on Czernovitz (modern day Chernivtsi, Ukraine), the city in which he spent his childhood. Czernovitz was, as it remains, the principal city of Bukovina, but since the First World War Bukovina has had a chequered history, and that is a source of much of the interest in this book and the two novels.

Pre-WW1, Bukovina was a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and it was for that reason that Von Rezzori's family - German speaking Austrians - were there. After the war, Bukovina became a part of the kingdom of Romania, but not for long. The Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact awarded the region to the Soviet Union following the joint German-Soviet advance on Poland in 1939, but Romania took it back as part of the Axis invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941. The Red Army regained control in 1943-44 and northern Bukovina, encompassing Chernivtsi, was from 1947 formally a part of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, and since 1991 of independent Ukraine.

The politico-geographic situation of Bukovina, so very much the borderland between various countries and empires, meant that in pre-Soviet times many different language groups dwelt there, each with their different cultural traditions.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
A beautiful, evocative book, suffused with the long-passed codes of the world in which it was set, but also with the timelessness of recalled childhood memories. It does remind me of Proust in the richness of the descriptions, both of the physical and the social and emotional setting. Von Rezzori managed to make a beautiful thing out of his own memories of "anti-semitism"; this has fewer Jews and less anti-semitism, but is still full of the polyglot complexity of the Bukovina. I loved this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars 24 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enchanting 19 Sept. 2014
By Luca Graziuso and Marina Ross - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If "Memoirs of an Anti-Semite" had established Gregor von Rezzori's reputation as one of the world's great prose stylist, "The Snows of Yesteryear" further cements this reputation. However this book is a work of non-fiction whereas "Memoirs" was fiction. Not to be feared, Rezzori's nonfiction is all the more replete with allure and magic of storytelling.
The Snows of Yesteryear brings back in glowing colors and radiant light a Central European world that vanished in 1938: the town houses and country estates, the Vienna apartments and the forest preserves of the old Austro-Hungarian aristocracy into which Rezzori was born. The first of the five section of the book is devoted to Cassandra, the weirdly costumed peasant who was Rezzori's wet nurse and nanny, an amazing comic figure who taught him "a salad of Armanian-German-Ruthenian-Polish-Hungarian-Turkish and Yiddish..".and who watched fiercely and hilariously over his fantasy-laden childhood.
Cassandra was in every way a contrast to his mother, the subject of the second section, a neurasthenic, stormy-tempered woman of exquisite beauty and bearing, the "prototype of a lady" who, after much drama and pain, left Rezzori's father, an architectural historian whose imaginative life was wholly absorbed by the world of hunting and shooting.
His father, a bright-natured, old-fashioned, anti-Semitic gentleman was ever bemused by his estranged, unhappy consort, and Rezzori's portrait of him forms a brilliant centerpiece to the book.
The fourth section concerns Rezzori's marvelous older sister, who died tragically when only 21 and whose influence on the author was profound, permanent and deeply ambiguous.
Last comes the inimitable and extraordinary governess Miss Lina Strauss, a once friend of Mark Twain, who was imported to teach young Rezzori as she had done his mother.
The epilogue is a thing of rare beauty: Gregor von Rezzori offers a haunting account of his visit to Czernowitz 53 years after his departure...
In giving us five superb portraits with the greatest psychological subtlety, Rezzori also paints a group picture that is dazzling in its social detail, gripping in its dramatic tension and gloriously evocative of a fascinating bygone world.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Life With Wealthy Mom and Dad, the Governess' and Too Much War 2 Jan. 2015
By Glenda White - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A Biography From A Man of The Times
After reading so many great reviews, I rushed to order the book and, upon reading, experienced a big letdown. Quite disappointing. The author's mother could never, ever measure up, and his dad was awarded too many excuses for his behavior. However, asided from the family dynamics as viewed by the author, he rewarded the reader with great insight into what it must've been like, living in the middle lands between Russia and Europe, what with the map lines being re-drawn every so many years and conflicts ad nauseum. Surely he wrote his remembrances as he felt them, but he took as fact his own reasoning for each family member's unhappiness and shortcomings, when he could never have known what he decided had made mom, dad, sis, the way they really were or what the intimate dynamics could've been. I gave up. The author's discriptions, praised by reviewers, were just not enough to keep me going. I came to see him as Spoiled Kid, destined to live in many of the same attitudes and wars that did so much to shape, harm and disappoint his parents and his governesses, and thusly, himself.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tales of displacement 28 Jun. 2011
By R. M. Peterson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In his Introduction to this edition, John Banville writes that THE SNOWS OF YESTERYEAR "is a masterpiece in that rare genre that might be classed as incidental autobiography." Banville compares the book with Nabokov's "Speak, Memory" - high praise, indeed. I won't suggest that THE SNOWS OF YESTERYEAR is quite on the same plane as "Speak, Memory", but SNOWS definitely is worth reading.

Two different aspects of the book make it of special interest. The first has to do with the historical and social milieu in which the author lived his early years, the years covered by THE SNOWS OF YESTERYEAR. Gregor von Rezzori was born in 1914 in Czernowitz, then the capital of the Bukovina, which in turn was one of the autonomous former crown lands of the House of Habsburg and, as such, part of the Austro-Hungarian Dual Monarchy. Thus, his formative years coincided with what he calls the "truce between two phases of the European suicide" (i.e, 1919-1939) and the collapse of the bourgeois culture of Mitteleuropa founded on the pillars of property and learning. Rezzori's account of that milieu and those years is among the richer and more rewarding that I have read.

The other noteworthy aspect of the book consists of the family figures around whom he structures his memoir: his mother, father, and sister, and his nanny and his governess. Each of them - at least as portrayed by Rezzori - is a memorable figure. Even works of fiction rarely feature a quintet of such distinctive characters.

To my mind the most memorable (though it is a close call) is Rezzori's father, who regarded himself as a Habsburg aristocrat through and through (the Rezzori family came from Sicily, at a time when it still belonged to the Holy Roman Empire). By profession, he was an architect and art historian, whose work responsibilities involved overseeing the monasteries of the Bukovina as a civil servant. By avocation, he was a hunter, and some of Rezzori's anecdotes are set in the dense forests of the Carpathians, hunting with his father. Although Rezzori elder was a strident anti-Semite and a social conservative, he was not a supporter of Hitler. Shortly after Hitler was appointed Chancellor, he drew his son's attention to a magazine article, replete with pictures of the new Führer, and commented: "It's all very fine and well, Germany rises once more. But have a look at this fellow: I wouldn't hire him as a stable boy!" His political ethos was from the snows of yesteryear, amongst the Habsburgs. "[H]e counted Romanians (after Czechs and Poles) among the body-strippers of the corpse of the defunct Dual Monarchy. Russians, Poles and Ruthenians were mere colonial populations. He saw himself as a leftover functionary of a liquidated empire. `We have been left here as a kind of cultural fertilizer,' was one of his favorite sayings." He stayed away from his daughter when she was dying of Hodgson's disease and he refused to summon his son to his own deathbed; those decisions were "based on the sober conviction that dying is a strictly private matter that cannot be shared with anyone."

(A quick word about Rezzori's governess, a woman born in Pomerania in the 1860's and clearly a major influence in his life. Rezzori gives her name as Lina Strauss and he writes that in the 1890s she had been the "lady companion" of Mark Twain during his years in Florence (at a time long before the death of Twain's beloved wife, Livy). Curiously, in neither my Mark Twain library (which, admittedly, is hardly comprehensive) nor on the Internet can I find any reference to a Lina Strauss as a companion of Twain or a member of the Twain household. If anyone has information to support the association, I would appreciate learning of it either by a comment or by e-mail.)

The book closes with a touching epilogue, dealing with Rezzori's visit in 1989 to Czernowitz (by then re-named Chernovtsy and within the borders of the Ukraine) for the first time in 53 years. After so much effort trying to reconstruct and re-inhabit the past, his visit to the city of his birth and boyhood proved to be another bittersweet exemplification of Thomas Wolfe's adage that you can't go home again. Rezzori published this memoir in 1989. He died in 1998.

Given my own fascination for the Habsburg Empire and Mitteleuropa, I was a natural reader for THE SNOWS OF YESTERYEAR. Nonetheless, at times it dragged, even for me. Rezzori is prone to over-write and over-analyze. Appropriate perhaps for a chronicler of a lost empire, he can be somewhat fusty and ornate in his prose. But for the most part he is clear-headed and unsentimental. What pervades THE SNOWS OF YESTERYEAR is not nostalgia so much as displacement.
5.0 out of 5 stars Poignant, Endearing Memoir 12 Aug. 2013
By zorba - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Von Rezzori here gives us a delightful, enriching autobiography, focused on five people who greatly influenced his life: his mother, father, sister, nursemaid and governess. It is all laid out on a tapestry of intra-war Eastern Europe, mainly in the Bukovina area of once-Romania, now-Ukraine, plus Vienna and other nearby environs. In the telling, Von Rezzori describes a family that is typical of most families -- yet, atypical in so many ways. The family is shaped, not only by the personalities involved, but by history -- by the ebb and flow of events between the World Wars in which boundaries of restless Europe were shaped and reshaped by events. You find yourself thinking that the Von Rezzoris are all bonkers, until you realize that the entire world at this time was insane. And if the father is pompous and detached, and the mother hysterical most of the time, the governess and the nursemaids, contrarily, are paragons of patience and wisdom. The sister perhaps is the only "sane" one -- but her life is tragically cut short in very early adulthood. And the author himself....well, he can be as eccentric as the others but, thank goodness, he's a good writer -- one of the best I've ever experienced, in fact. Von Rezzori's descriptive powers and psychological insights are tremendous. A major tip of the hat is due to the translator from the original German, H.F. Broch de Rothermann, who handles every word as if it were a gem. For me, this non-fiction memoir is at least the equal of all the great "family" books, fictional or true, that I've ever read. Having discovered Von Rezzori through his earlier book "An Ermine in Czernopol" I now consider him one of my favorite authors.
5.0 out of 5 stars A Different Kind of Book 20 Mar. 2015
By Book Bag Lady - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a difficult book to catagorize. It's part memoir, part fiction, non-fiction and a fascinating history of a lost time and place. The author was born in Czernowitz ( now part of Ukraine) at the start of World War I. He writes of a changing world through the lives of the characters who influenced his growing up years: his nervous mother, the preoccupied father, the brilliant sister and his beloved caregivers Casssandra and Bunchy. Von Rezzori uses a lot of words found only in a dictionary so it's a good idea to have one handy. What is most interesting is how people reacted to the extraordinary events going on around them, all the changing boundariesm shifting loyalites and loss of idenity.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know