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Slaying the Badger: LeMond, Hinault and the Greatest Ever Tour de France by [Moore, Richard]
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Slaying the Badger: LeMond, Hinault and the Greatest Ever Tour de France Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 84 customer reviews

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Length: 322 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

"Excellent." (Rouleur)

"Moore entertainingly unravels the complexities of the relationships within the peloton during a three-week stage race, the sort of battle in which alliances can shift from one mountain peak to another and your enemy's enemy can suddenly become your most valued friend" (Richard Williams Guardian)

"From the opening pages this is a book that grips. Combining great insight, interviews and anecdotes with wonderfully vivid writing, it is thoroughly researched and well written. Like the event itself, the book is so engrossing, you don't want it to end" (Scotland on Sunday)

"As a matter of some urgency, arm yourself first with Slaying the Badger by Richard Moore and immerse yourself in the epic story of the 1986 Tour and the two greatest riders of their era. ... The race and the book builds towards a gripping page turning climax which you don't want to end" (Bredan Gallagher Daily Telegraph)

"A gripping narrative of this psychological and physical three-week war... It is good to be reminded that the race used to have twice-a-day stages, that helmets didn't always obscure the riders and that technology once had little place in the Tour" (Wall Street Journal)

Book Description

Heroes and villains, spectacle and controversy, mind games and endurance - this is the 1986 Tour de France.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3048 KB
  • Print Length: 322 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Digital (26 May 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0050OLH6M
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 84 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #15,050 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Absolutely brilliant retelling of the events surrounding the 1986 Tour de France by Richard Moore. This was the first Tour broadcast on British TV by Channel 4 and as it was also my first Tour it brought back many many great memories.

Moore tries to unravel the events surrounding Lemond's victory and whether or not his team mate, Hinault (the badger) was riding against him to gain victory for himself and win an unprecedented sixth victory. Claim and counter claim from our two protagonists ensure that the `truth' will never be known, however, by interviewing many of the major players of the 1986 Tour, Moore manages to add further intrigue and controversy to an already legendary tale.

Both Lemond and Hinault are brilliant characters (Hinault is simply a mad Frenchman - check out when he was driving and texting) and I found it difficult to take sides. As a result, for me, the book had the ideal ending.

Richard Moore has played a blinder with this story and proved that his biography of Robert Millar was no fluke.

I would recommend `Slaying the Badger' not just to fans of cycling and the Tour de France, but to any fan of sporting drama! A delightful read. Thank you Richard.
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Format: Paperback
I don't think I'm spoiling anyone's read when I say that LeMond comes out on top in this one (otherwise it would only be "attempted slaying" of said Badger, aka Bernard Hinault), but what a fantastic story of two emulous teammates vying for the top prize in such a storied and brutal sport.

I was eager to get my hands on a copy when I saw this become available to pre-order. Firstly, as a cycling fan it represents welcome respite from the current doping scandals in which the sport is embroiled. While you may, after reading the book (especially the first few paragraphs), feel that it wasn't exactly a "clean" race, I would much rather read about tactical intrigue and sub-plots than any pharmaceutical underhandedness.

Secondly, having enjoyed his first couple of books, I was keen to read more from Moore given the entertaining and well informed style through which he delivers a story. Having said that, don't just take the word of a self-professed fan; I think the awards and critical acclaim he has received to date make a good case for reading his books.

There are already plenty of detailed professional reviews which dissect the whole book and provide a synopsis of virtually the entire story. However, having read many of the reviews while waiting for my copy to arrive I would advise against reading them and just get stuck into the book itself. Given that the story played out some 25 years ago, even those who followed the race at the time will have forgotten a lot of the detail. To approach the book fresh allows you to re-live it but with the added benefit of the thoroughly researched commentary provided by Moore as well as the thoughts and views of the protagonists themselves.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Richard Moore is the perfect writer to tell the tale of the 1986 Tour de France and the rivalry between Bernard Hinault and Greg Le Mond. His passion and knowledge of cycling shine through as they did in the other two books by him that I have read, In Search of Robert Millar: Unravelling the Mystery Surrounding Britain's Most Successful Tour de France Cyclist: Unravelling the Mystery Surrounding Britain's Most Successful Tour De France Cyclist and Heroes, Villains and Velodromes: Chris Hoy and Britain's Track Cycling Revolution but it is ability to construct a narrative and the fluid style of his writing that makes him stand so tall in the ranks of modern sports writers. The story of this epic race is told through the words of people who were there. Le Mond and Hinault themselves as well as directeur sportives and fellow riders. Moore introduces us to all the players, giving us a background to each of their perspectives and an idea of their personalities and then tells to unfolding story through their words so that you finish the book feeling like you have been there in the heart of the race yourself. It reads like a gripping novel so well is it constructed. As I write this we're 2 weeks away from the 2011 Tour de France and this is a book I would strongly advise you read as to set your pulse racing in anticipation of this year's race.
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Format: Paperback
Having enjoyed Richard Moore's fascinating biography of Robert Millar, I was excited to see he had again turned his pen towards obsessive characters in this classic period of cycling history. Not only is the book superbly written, but the apparent level of research he has made into his subjects is staggering. Combine this with Moore's genuine insight into the mind of sportsmen, and you have a book that will delight any reader, while still providing surprises for the best-informed sports fans. Superb.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am surprised (and slightly skeptical) at all the gushing reviews. This book was okay but nothing more. It takes an interesting moment in cycling history and turns it into a plodding tale that is poorly edited. Only in the last 70 or so pages when we get to the 1986 Tour does the story take off; before that the pace is leaden.

The editing is poor with anecdotes and stories repeated within pages of each other. The way Moore writes about Shelly Verses is illustrative - she is introduced as the soigneur of 7-Eleven. A few chapters later he comes back to Verses and repeats much of the earlier chapter about her being the only female soigneur in the peloton. Moore does this a lot - providing the same details multiple times.

The opening chapters about meeting with Hinault, LeMond and Kochli are very dull. The interviews also have little bearing on the rest of the book. For instance, for someone who was meant to have revolutionsed cycling, very little detail is given as to how Kochli actually impacted results or his methodology. At the end Kochli takes pride from the La Vie Claire results in 1986, yet it's probably fair to say Kochli made very little if any difference - La Vie Claire simply had the top two riders in the peloton and another 2-3 top riders. It is not clear what Kochli did as directeur sportif, indeed, it appears he was too weak to stand up to Hinault and had he been a better directeur sportif would have sorted the leadership squabble, but this is never addressed.

The writing is also jumbled with Moore jumping around timeframes without explanation. One minute we are at a race in 1982, then back to 1979, then again in 1982, then in 1976 etc without any reason, cohesion or narrative flow.

Hinault comes across as an arrogant, bullying pig.
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