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Sky & Telescope's Pocket Sky Atlas Jumbo Edition Spiral-bound – 29 Jan 2016

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Spiral-bound: 136 pages
  • Publisher: F+W; Spi edition (29 Jan. 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1940038251
  • ISBN-13: 978-1940038254
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 1.8 x 30.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 560,535 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

Roger Sinnott is a senior contributing editor of Sky & Telescope magazine. He coauthored the two-volume Sky Catalogue 2000.0. In 1997, he collaborated with Michael Perryman of the European Space Agency on the Millennium Star Atlas, the most detailed all-sky atlas of its time. Minor planet 3706 Sinnott is named in Roger’s honor.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
I've owned the standard (pocket sized)edition of this atlas for several years now,and it's my 'field atlas' and first port of call when looking for a celestial target.
When I found out about this jumbo edition,I quickly decided to buy it as a 'Library copy.
The layout of the charts seems easier to use, to me at least,than some other Star Atlas that are currently avaiable.
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Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
Very easy to read and use. My favourite star atlas.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars 28 reviews
48 of 49 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's bigger, but is it really better? 11 Jan. 2016
By Jim Erwin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
I'll start off by saying I love the "standard" edition. It joins me on every visit to my dark site. I was however a bit disappointed with the Jumbo Edition, mostly because I expected more out of it. The standard edition's pages are about 6" x 9", with margins of anywhere between a half inch and 3/4 inches The actual chart on each page is 5" x 7 3/4" Some pages are too small to show an entire constellation, and I find myself flipping between pages way too often. The way the sky is divided up, you find your self flipping between page 45 and page 65 as an example. I hoped the jumbo edition would have larger pages, and thus show more of the sky allowing me to flip pages less often. I based this assumption off nothing really, as I believe I'm the first review amazon for this, I had nothing to go on, there were no internal description of the book, I just assumed the jumbo version, being bigger than the standard would show me more of the sky per page. For the 3rd time in my life I was wrong about something.

When the Jumbo Edition arrived I found the EXACT same charts. Just larger...slightly. Each page is 8 3/8 x 11 3/4, with margins between 1/2" to 1 1/4". The chart size was 6 1/2 x 10 1/8. So they stretched the chart about an 1 1/2" side to side, and about 2 1/4" up and down. The Jumbo Edition had a hard cover, which I fear will get nasty after a few wet nights at the dark site. The rest of the pages appear to be the same water resistant pages as the other Sky Atlas, but they feel slightly different to the touch, so I guess time will tell if they hold up. The rest of the book is almost exactly the same, the words Jumbo Edition appear on each page, the publication dates changed, and the Sky & Telescope logo is printed on a page. They did add a few more Close-Up Charts. Today it goes from A to D, The jumbo edition goes to J. These extra close-up charts are of the Large Magellanic Cloud, which is wasted on those of us in north, but it also includes the Cone and Rosette, Big Dipper Bowl, Lion's Tail, Sky near Deneb, Steam from Teapot and Scorpion's Tail, which are all objects that can be seen by those of us in the Northern Hemisphere.

If your eyes get tired quicker than in your youth and you desire slightly larger print, this might help. If you haven't yet bought a pocket sky atlas, this might be a good addition to your inventory (if the hard cover and pages don't deteriorate the first time they get wet). If you already own a pocket sky atlas and are happy with it, and have no problems reading it, then I would not consider the jumbo edition a needed upgrade.

This will probably join me in my back yard where I get way less dew, but I might use it sparingly at my dark site until I know it can survive some moisture.

Clear Skies Everyone!
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I couldn't resist and I'm glad I didn't. 21 Jan. 2016
By Joseph Shuster Sr. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
I have and I really enjoy the original "Pocket" atlas. So I wondered if this larger version would be worth the extra price. I couldn't resist and I'm glad I didn't. The Jumbo edition is fantastic. It's a practical tool in a reading chair, desk, or next to your telescope under the stars. The bigger size is especially helpful to anyone who benefits from bigger fonts and graphics -- nearly everyone over 45.

The construction is well done. The covers are hard and the front cover can wrap behind the back. The spiral binding actually has a little nicer arrangement than the original. The pages are dew resistant -- the paper seems the same as the original. And the graphics are top notch, too -- good choices for fonts, icons, rules. Like any good atlas, the links to neighboring parts of the sky are easily found with cross references in the margin.

If you had to chose only one edition, your two prime decisions factors would be print size and portability. If you need the larger fonts and graphics, the Jumbo is the easy call. Some people care about a small footprint for travel or a flexible cover for aggressive packing more than the print size. They could make a case for the original with its smaller dimensions and flexible cover. If you're deciding which edition to get as a gift, I think most astronomers would appreciate the Jumbo.

BTW, people will tease that the Jumbo shouldn't be called a "pocket atlas". But in all frankness, the original didn't fit into any pockets, either.
5.0 out of 5 stars ... "Jumbo" edition of the S&T _Pocket Sky Atlas_ is better than the original 20 Mar. 2017
By George A. Reynolds - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
This "Jumbo" edition of the S&T _Pocket Sky Atlas_ is better than the original, because the maps and print are larger and easier to read. It no longer fits in a pocket (well, neither did the original, unless you had overly large pockets), but it is easier to use than Wil Tirion's _Sky Atlas 2000.0_, because it fits on a table better.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An easy 5 star recommendation 13 Jan. 2016
By JWM3 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
I don't own the smaller edition, so my review will just focus on this book.

If you are a new to astronomy and don't like to take a laptop to your viewing site, this book is a valuable resource for under $30. It contains 80 charts of the sky, plus an additional 10 "close-up" charts of commonly-viewed areas like Orion and the Pleiades. There are more than 30,000 stars and 1,500 deep sky objects (DSOs) on the charts, which seems a perfect blend of detail without being overwhelming.

The book has several nice touches, like a spiral binding that allows the book to be held open with one page (useful while navigating the stars) and a star sizing chart on the inside cover.

Amateur astronomers spend hundreds of dollars (or thousands) on eyepieces and heating strips and many thousands on mounts and scopes; here is a resource for $25-30 that will teach you about the wonders of the heavens.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Atlas for beginner or intermediate users 20 Feb. 2016
By Michael Sandler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
This is a larger version of the pocket sky atlas which has been available for years. It is done by the same people who produced Sky Atlas 2000 & uses the same format, coloring etc. it just has fewer stars going to magnitude 7.6 instead of 8.5. It had added 8 additional closeup charts compared to the pocket atlas & of course the charts are bigger.
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