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In A Silent Way
 
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In A Silent Way

17 Aug. 1998 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
18:14
30
2
19:52
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 14 Aug. 1998
  • Release Date: 17 Aug. 1998
  • Label: Columbia/Legacy
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 38:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B006N034IG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 70 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,625 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
“Jazz-rock fusion”… a label that has inspired dozens of mediocre records! But here it is in its primeval and arguably never to be bettered form – a groundbreaking showcase for the talents of artists at the peak of their skills and an addictive and quite brilliant example of true musical innovation.
Like “Kind of Blue” a decade earlier Miles Davis assembles a stunningly adept peer group – including Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Jo Zawinul, John McLaughlin, Tony Williams, Chick Corea & Dave Holland – and then pushes their and his playing to previously undiscovered heights. The end result?… jazz improvisation at its very best, with nothing detracting from the unstoppable flow of the satisfyingly tight melodic structures, despite the enormous complexity of what is actually going on, and with the complete record merging into a gloriously unified whole.
“In a Silent Way” quickly draws you into its languidly ethereal atmosphere, driving poly-rhythms and wonderful extemporisations and, like all true jazz masterpieces, pays out enormous bonuses from repeat listening. One of the essential reasons why Miles Davis justifies his reputation and… a template for much future imitation and excess.
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By A Customer on 20 May 2001
Format: Audio CD
This is simply glorious music. John McLaughlin's guitar playing at the beginning of track 2 is pure beauty. Miles himself plays less on this record than most of his others, but his influence can be felt echoing around the music. There are also hints on McLaughlin's music in this CD. Simple, open and spacious are all perfect descriptions of the tracks. My favourite moment is on "Shh/Peaceful" when Tony William's drums stop for a moment, leaving Wayne Shorter's saxophone floating through. Wonderful.
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Format: Audio CD
Miles Davis’ career spanned nearly five decades, and he was the engine for much change in jazz. From the early be-bop days through his later fusion, Miles covered just about every type of jazz (with the exception of that abomination called “smooth jazz”). From the early records on Prestige, through the seminal Kind of Blue, to later albums like Tutu, Miles embraced change.

The year 1969 was exceptionally fecund, with the recording of two radically different albums: In a Silent Way and Bitches Brew. The former is a collection of slow, almost ambient improvisations; the latter uses a similar approach, but with a powerful rhythm section. Both feature electric instruments and develop Miles’ version of jazz fusion.

In a Silent Way is just over 38 minutes and consists of two songs: Shhh/Peaceful and In a Silent Way/It’s About That Time. Recorded in one day, on February 18, 1969, about three hours of music was used to create these two tracks. With Teo Macero producing Miles for the first time, this record is partly the result of improvisations, partly the result of Macero’s work editing different sections together. For example, on Shhh/Peaceful, Macero took the first six minutes of the track and repeated them at the end, making a piece in three sections which, with this odd edit, works quite well.

While this record could be called fusion, it’s much more. There are electric keyboards, there’s a pulsing beat, but it doesn’t have the rhythmic drive that Bitches Brew shows. Shhh/Peaceful is more rhythmic; In a Silent Way/It’s About That Time shifts between sections that are almost ambient and parts that are more rhythmic. The music is simple, beautiful, and flows like waves.
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By A Customer on 28 May 2004
Format: Audio CD
'In a Silent Way' is one of many, many Miles Davis jazz records that should be taken down and noted by any Jazz lover. It is a little different from the norm, featuring just two tracks - but those two are expansive, brilliantly imagined and produced works of pure art.
Personally, I warm to the second, the title track more than the Corea/Hancock/Zawinul collaboration that is the first track. However, looking at the first one, it is also brilliantly true to form and is mystefying and incredible in itself. It's quiet, sloshing drum beat that runs right through the piece is perfect 'background whispering' to the voices of each of the instruments that ride above it. From Zawinuls organ, to Davis' own brilliant trumpet solos. From all the musicians however, these are never brash, never bold and always tasteful. The sound is complete and the oscilations from deep, magical space right back to quiet humming noise are simply mesmerising.
The second track is split into three parts. The first section is repeated after the simply gorgeous middle. Both of them are as equally well crafted as track one, but a little bit more outspoken, more definate in purpose. Particularly the middle section, which rings out more of the old trad. jazz we might have heard on 'Kind Of Blue' than anywhere else on the album. That in itself though is a relief. KOB was a masterpiece, and so is 'In a Silent Way'; but in its own... silent way.
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Format: Audio CD
I'm no expert when it comes to jazz, often finding that a lot of jazz music tends to fade into the background as you listen to it. Fine, I suppose, for coffee bars or dinner parties, when the focus tends to fall more on conversation, though perhaps not so riveting for solitary afternoon listens or late night exploration. Often, I've found jazz to be more rewarding when coupled with a more experimental rock sound, keeping the notion of long atmospheric improvisations intact, but advancing further with ideas of rhythm, melody and momentum.
One of my favourite albums is the self-titled debut of former Talk Talk member Mark Hollis, which takes elements of a jazz template and merges it with elements of rock and folk. It is through Hollis and his work with Talk Talk that I discovered the music of Miles Davis, with many people citing the influence of albums like Miles Smiles, Kind of Blue and In A Silent Way on those two Talk Talk classics, Spirit of Eden and Laughing Stock. If you're familiar with those albums, particularly the more subdued Laughing Stock, then you'll have a vague idea of what to expect from this album... with the influence of In A Silent Way also finding it's way onto albums as disparate as Astral Weeks by Van Morrison, Dead Bees on a Cake by David Sylvian, Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here, Eno's Music for Films and Kid A/Amnesiac by Radiohead.
The music here is broken down into two tracks (although there are really four parts in total, or five if you count the reprise of the title track at the end) with the album opening with the epic improvisation piece, Shhh/Peaceful.
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