Buy Used
£2.79
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Tree Savers
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A used book that is in good, clean condition. Your item will be picked, packed and posted FREE to you within the UK by Amazon, also eligible for super saver delivery
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Silent Takeover: Global Capitalism and the Death of Democracy Paperback – 26 Apr 2001

4.2 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£0.01
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: William Heinemann (26 April 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0434009334
  • ISBN-13: 978-0434009336
  • Product Dimensions: 18.9 x 2 x 17.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,410,052 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

The Silent Takeover might be thought of as something of a contradiction in terms. In the world of modern mergers and acquisitions, hardly a single transaction goes by without noisy comment from every conceivable angle. But the Takeover here is of an altogether different order, referring to the takeover of the planet itself rather than a business rival. Did you know that of the world's largest economies, 51 are now corporations and only 49 are nation-states? You do now.

Noreena Hertz gives an evocative and highly readable account of economic change over the past two decades. Such material in the wrong hands can be stultifingly boring, but this is fast and accessible, personal, almost intimate. The reader is left in little doubt of the author's view that not everyone benefits from the capitalist dream (the work is, after all, subtitled Global Capitalism and the Death of Democracy). "The 20-year neo-liberal experiment that began in Westminster and Washington has not delivered for all of us".

One would expect to see the names of Rupert Murdoch, Ted Turner, Time Warner, General Electric and McDonalds in any review of the rise and rise of the corporate giant. But Big Brother, Buddha, 2001: A Space Odyssey, the Ku Klux Klan and Soylent Green? Noreena Hertz, once an investment banker in Russia, now based at the University of Cambridge, draws attention to the apocalyptic visions of several films of the 1970s. Included in the list is Rollerball, a depiction of life on earth after a series of corporate wars. Anyone who thought that far-fetched in the 1970s might care to reconsider, she ventures to suggest. "A world in which Rupert Murdoch has more power than Tony Blair, and corporations set the political agenda, is frightening and undemocratic", she writes. "We stand today at a critical juncture. If we do nothing... all is lost", she concludes. --Brian Bollen

Review

"Dr Hertz is one of the world's leading young thinkers, whose agenda-setting book on corporate power is already sparking intense debate on both sides of the Atlantic" (Observer)

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I read a good deal of No Logo before becoming fed up with what I read to be a polemic... I didn't like the book, because Klein states her opinions as facts, and gives little evidence to back up much of what she says.
However, I paricularly liked The Silent Takeover because she prsents an ibjective argument with plenty of evidence. It is up-to-date, including events which couldn't have happened more than a short while before publication. It is not wholly negative and biased against big business, as No Logo seems to be, and gives a number of reasons why business is good.
She examines why business, in many cases, seems to be better than government - it's more flexible, less beaurocratic, and able to quickly adjust to consumer demands if it wants.
In examining the role of the WTO and World Bank, she points out the good and bad of each.
A strong book, well-argued and definitely one to replace No Logo on your coffee table... stand out from the crowd!
Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I must strongly disagree with the first review of this book.
In her book, Ms Hertz has fashioned a fiery indictment of business, government and the business of goverment in the 21st Century. She has done so with wit, showmanship and - most importantly - without losing her audience.
Agreeably, her end point is a radical one. But it is not so much a conclusion as a starting point for action and discussion. For the corporate control of the way in which we live is an issue which is growing, not shrinking.
The reviewer writes that "The only real way to effect change is through the law and the reaffirmation by governments and the courts of their authority".
Had he read the book more closely, the reviewer would realise that this view is shared by Ms Hertz. What she suggests, however, is that there is an alternative.
What's more, that the pharmaceutical companies backed down in South Africa is an endorsement of her arguments. It was brought to light through the inability of South Africans to buy generic AIDS medicine. This was an economic battle. And it was won not through legislation, but through people power.
THE SILENT TAKEOVER is a superb book. I was left contemplating the erosion of democracy at the most personal level i.e. how it affects me. And I was shocked.
As for a publicity campaign, it is just that: publicity, not hype. If Ms Hertz is sold as glamorous or as a "pop" economist, then all the better. Hers is not a message for the dusty bookshelves of academia.
It is for us, here and now.
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The WTO debacle at Seattle, corruptible Helmut Kohl, no discernible policy choice between the UK Labour and the Conservatives, Senate changes in the US based on no mandate (one man changes his mind) and the longest period of widespread peace in Europe and North America - Politics, like baseball, is fast becoming a minority sport.
Given the irrelevance of who may or may not have won the US presidential election last year combined with the very recent US senate changes, Hertz's provides a book that isn't just political rhetoric. Instead we have a discussion of the corporate-government-people relationships that, regardless of whether they may or may not have taken place, have changed how people feel. We can all dispute the facts and the version of events put forward by Hertz in the book, but how do people feel? Yes, this book touches a raw global nerve. We can not shy away from the very real perception that politicians are impotent in the face of corporate globalisation.
The book makes some astute observations of the roles of the WTO and UN at the global level, asking whether they really serve us? or we them? in terms of accountability and conflict of interests. How does one balance the "blind trust fund" concept of public ownership, in order to remain impartial, with the desire for transparency and accountability, in order to ensure voters feel enfranchised?
This book will not appeal to those who champion either extreme of free market or public ownership models, instead it will have popular appeal to those who (a) have never experienced the need to fight for basic suffrage (b) increasingly see politics as a complete waste of time. Why do we bother? This is not a high minded book, it is a worthy attempt at trying to engage the "real voters" in a debate about what is important and where the power lies. Do you really vote?
If you didn't vote in your last election, you should buy this book.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
While this is very similar in theme to No Logo, One Market Under God et al, it is still a well-written critique, readable and a good introduction to the themes involved.
Moreover, it is actually relatively balanced, presenting as it does the counter-arguments to the main theme. This makes it more of an argument than a polemic, which is refreshing.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
An excellent book, well researched and extremely easy to read, Noreena Hertz provides a superb account of how major corporations are slowly eroding the power of democratically elected governments. She explains how institutions such as the WTO and large, rich corporations are turning Nation states into mere puppets.
A superb read that illustrates and explains the inequalities in todays world together with reasons why voting is seen less important than protests.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback