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Silent Exodus [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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3 used from £44.29

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Region 1 encoding. (This DVD will not play on most DVD players sold in the UK [Region 2]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region DVD player and compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.

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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B002D19EEC
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 326,145 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This documentary should be seen by one and all. It is not in the top flight of documentaries by any means, and were its subject matter covered elsewhere, I would perhaps not give it more than 3 stars. What it contains, however, would warrant 5 stars, since it is an extremely relevant and important subject that does not seem to have attracted any attention whatsoever.
Whilst the world is constantly bombarded with information on refugees throughout the Middle East, more particularly with reference to the unending misery of the homeless Palestinians, no mention is ever made of the plight of the large number of Jews who were victimized in the various Arab countries throughout the Middle East following on from the Arab Israeli war in 1948. Their treatment, as related by various of the victims themselves in this documentary, was very much akin to that meted out to the Jews by the Nazis in pre-war Germany. Being unlawfully and arbitrarily dispossessed and abused, they had little alternative but to flee, with nothing more than the clothes on their backs. It seems that most reached Israel, where they somehow rebuilt their lives from zero (although that is not covered in the documentary). It is a shabby tale, and one that should not have been forgotten - if, that is, it was ever widely known. Now you can find out for yourself.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The tragic story of Jews in Arab lands has escaped the attention of the popular press and is not included in popular perception of conflict in the Middle East. This is unjust and leads to misperception of possible solutions. Pierre Rehov has done an amazing job of collection the recollections of Jews who had to flee Arab countries, outnumbering Arabs who fled nascent Israel for a mixture of reasons including Arab propaganda and demonisation of Jews rather than the sort of persecution and oppression which Jews of Arab lands fled.

Also available from Amazon is a similar DVD, 'The Forgotten Refugees', which I understand is an illegal copyright theft version of Rehov's material, currently subject to a court case in France. The two versions differ in that 'The Silent Exodus', the legal version, contains some horrific accounts and scenes of violence which should not be shown to children. However, these things did happen and it is important that adults interested in these matters should know about them and understand their horror, the more so as tacit denial reigns.

This version of 'The Silent Exodus' is for North American TVs and video players and will not play in Europe unless the equipment can play Region 1 coded DVDs with the NTSC television standard (much of the better equipment in the UK can). Amazon France sells a version in the European Region 2 and PAL standards which will play on all normal equipment sold in the UK and Europe. It comes with an additional film on the same DVD and comes from Pierre Rehov perfectly legally. It is barely necessary to know any French to use the Amazon France site, and payment is easy because your UK Amazon account works on it, presenting the cost in UK currency if you are in the UK.

This is an important historical record and I recommend it strongly for adults and older teenagers. It is not suitable for young children.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews
27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Myth debunking at its best 12 Mar. 2007
By Alyssa A. Lappen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Through historical news clips and films, this exemplary 2004 documentary sheds light on a very thorny question raised by pundits' frequent claims that, from medieval times through the early 20th century, life was vastly better for Jewish residents of the Arab and Muslim Middle East than for those in Christian Europe.

Namely: if that were true, why in 1939, did less than one percent of the world's 17 million Jewish people live in the Arab and Muslim Middle East, against more than 40 percent in Christian Europe?

Evidently, life for 1.5 million Jews in the Muslim Middle East wasn't so much better than for the majority who lived in Europe, after all. In general, it may have been worse.

Here available for the first time to a large public audience, for example, are black and white films of the hundreds of naked bodies of Jews murdered and piled in wagons in circa 1911 Morocco.

Here too are interviews with several surviving victims of the June 1, 1941 Farhud (pogrom) against Iraqi Jews. Houses were destroyed, shopkeepers bludgeoned to death (in the head), homes and synagogues burned, and women and girls raped. In one particularly disturbing interview, a woman describes her gang rape, as a 12-year-old girl, by Muslim men who verbally expressed during the act their delight to destroy the dignity and virginity of a Jewish girl.

Viewers witness mobs of Arabs rallying, parading and screaming for Jewish blood, the merciless hangings of innocent Jewish men--simply for being Jewish--and the conflagrations that destroyed Jewish homes, businesses and houses of worship.

Here are also gathered films of impoverished Jews, clothed in rags and flimsy sandals, trudging through the desert to escape the massive pogroms launched against Middle Eastern Jews following the 1948 establishment of Israel.

This remarkable set of film archives, and documents, gathered in a comprehensive form explain a great deal--as do the accompanying interviews with Islamic scholars.

For thousands of years, a relative handful of surviving Jews were scattered through Aden, Yemen, Egypt, Iraq, Syria, Morocco, Tunisia, Libya, and Iran. They were few largely due to religious ideology and teaching that encouraged the persecution of non-Muslim minorities, and especially Jews. Indeed, apart from Yemen (where Jews were also mercilessly exiled to barren deserts for a time) the vast majority of Arabia's Jews were expelled or murdered during the time of Mohammed, and at his command.

In short, this film provides important evidence that the exodus of 1.5 million forgotten Jewish refugees from the Arab and Muslim world began long before Israel's creation--and was largely fueled by ancient sectarian hatred.

How dare the dhimmis, who for centuries had paid head taxes merely for the right to breathe, and whose testimony had been considered unlawful by every court, establish a democratic government of their own, granting them justice and equal rights?

Until the destruction of 6 million Jewish people in the Nazi Holocaust, at least 8 million Jews lived in Europe--and only about 1.5 million in the Arab Middle East.

After seeing this film, one asks an important, and previously obscured question: If tolerance in the the Muslim world was so much greater--Why so few?

--Alyssa A. Lappen
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A documentary about the 1,000,000 neglected Mizrahi Jewish refugees 4 Feb. 2009
By Rory - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Pierre Rehov's film tells the story of 1,000,000 Middle Eastern (Mizrahi) Jews who were compelled to leave Arab countries and became refugees. Most of them went to Israel. These Jews predated both Islam and Christianity, and have had a contiguous presence in the Middle East for thousands of years. Yet throughout history they suffered under Arab rule (some periods were worse than others). Eventually these Jews left-- most went to Israel.

Rehov's documentary explores the rise of Islamic radicalism and Arab nationalism which made life for Mizrahi Jews unbearable. There are firsthand accounts from Middle Eastern Jews from various Arab countries who experienced and witnessed persecution. The film is extremely useful to anyone who wants a fair and comprehensive view of the Israel-Arab conflict.

Today, fewer than 3,000 Jews remain in Middle Eastern lands, many living in poverty. They also often find themselves the recipients of religious hate-crimes. My father's family was from Iraq where the population of Babylonian Jews numbered at over 150,000. Today there are 7 Jews remaining. Middle Eastern Jewish communities have been totally ethnically cleansed and have received scant attention from international human rights groups (there hasn't even been a single UN resolution addressing the plight of Mizrahi Jews). It is shameful.

As a daughter of Middle Eastern Jews, I am very inspired by Pierre Rehov's comprehensive work on this subject.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars truth exposed 24 April 2010
By Robert - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
We always hear about the Palestinian refugees of the 1948 war. Yet we never hear about the 1 million Jewish refugees expelled from Arab countries following that war (nor about their plight as second class "non Muslim" citizens for centuries prior to that event). It goes a long way to explain why a two State option is the only solution for the Middle East. Muslims do not wish to share their country with non believers, and through the simple math of birth rate, they would become the majority of any other option. More importantly, Jewish refugees were accepted and absorbed by their new country.They lost everything, were able to rebuild and are looking neither for compensation nor to return. The Palestinians, on the other hand, are still struggling in their refugee camps. Talk about Arab solidarity....
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely superior look into the mentality of Middle East psych 1 Feb. 2012
By CREED - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This offered a rarely visited view into the Jewish plight of post-World War II that simply isn't taught and is back up with video footage and first person accounts.
5.0 out of 5 stars The True Story That Few Know About 12 Feb. 2014
By Mark - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Pierre Rehov lets the Jews who lived in Arab lands speak for themselves about their painful exodus and how they were mistreated in Arab countries for centuries, often attacked violently and always treated as sub-human. They are not living in refugee camps today. They have been integrated into Israeli society and have brought their unique culture with them to Israel and made great contribution to Israel even though they came with little no material things or money, but with faith and hope. Be sure to get all of Pierre Rehov's documentaries. They are all eye openers.
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