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Signals
 
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Signals

14 July 1997 | Format: MP3

4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 5.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:34
30
2
4:48
30
3
4:56
30
4
6:22
30
5
6:24
30
6
3:43
30
7
4:53
30
8
5:49
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Signals is so iconic to me because listening to it immediately transports me back to a great time in my life. I had just completed my A levels, took a year out and simply had a fantastic time working part time, messing about and enjoying myself. Signals was playing in my bedroom most mornings and evenings when I was home. It was on my walkman when I spent hot summer days fishing and my best mate always had it on when I was round his. It was the soundtrack to my year off.

Signals definitely seemed to be a line in the sand that Rush had drawn from their past. They had evolved over a succession of albums and now their heady days of 2112 and Farewell To Kings were behind them to the point that live performances of the older material was limited to excerpts from just 4 or 5 tracks merged into a 10 minute medley. Signals is quite simply a fantastic album and is probably only bettered by Power Windows as a complete piece of work. I struggle to pick a favourite track from Signals as they are all that good but Analog Kid and Countdown do spring immediately to mind. This album is worth every penny it will cost you. Signals is all about the writing and less about the technicalities of the guitar work. Alex Lifeson steps back and acts more like the thread that weaves this album together rather than his previous roles as the icing on a very elaborate cake. Its is an accomplished piece of work and proved to be the spring board to a series of great albums. The 1983 Signals tour was my first taste of Rush live and quite frankly no other band has even come remotely close to eclipsing these three gods on stage.

I have yet to meet anyone who thinks Signals is a poor album ... although most Rush fans tend to be a little bit biased and protective about the band. Trust me its an album you will play again and again.
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Format: Audio CD
I rate this album as one of their very best ever. Right up there with Moving Pictures, Permanent Waves, A Farewell to Kings.

I had just got into Rush and had really liked Moving Pictures.

I then heard this and was blown away.

Whereas many Rush fans stayed stuck in the past and moaned at the "reggae" on the album, I embraced it.

This album was when Rush proved they would continue to be a continuing force in rock music beyond their hard rock roots.

I can't really understand much of the criticism of this album.

Most of it centres around the sound. The guitar is "drowned out".

However, for me this misses the point. People are comapring this with their later work where they hit new heights with synth technology.

This was their first foray into it so was never going to have the same crispness as the others.

Whilst I agree the sound quality is not their best, being obsessive about this is missing the truly superb songs that are on this album.

First, there is one of the greatest Rush songs of all time - Subdivisions. Being a typical 16 year old at the time, the lyrics struck an absolute raw nerve with me and still make the hairs on the back of my neck stick up. They are amongst Neil Peart's very best and could not fit better with the music.

Both Analog Kid and Chemistry are also great efforts.

But then the truly superb Digital Man. This is another outstanding rush song and I was delighted to see it got recognition by being included in their track list for their latest tour.

The Weapon is another clever and imaginative effort and swiftly followed by New World Man. This song epitomises everything that is good about Rush.
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Format: Audio CD
Although not quite as musically challenging or complex as some of their earlier albums, Signals remains one of my own personal favourites. The lyrics are incredibly descriptive and heartfelt. Who can fail to relate to the deeply personal feelings expressed in "losing it" and the pressure felt by all teenagers to conform and loose their individuality in "Subdivisions" and the "Analog Kid". Thankfully some of us never do entirely. So sit back, close your eyes and soar into the heavens hitching a ride on "Space Shuttle Columbia", if this doesn't send a chill down your spine I suggest you check the mirror to make sure you're not dead!
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Format: Audio CD
I still **** my pants every time I listen to this album, I really think it's that good. I remember listening to Countdown when it was in the charts (yes it was people!), this being the first song I had ever heard by the band - I was mesmerised by the lyrics, and story telling of the song, and the way the song just builds and builds, carrying me with it. When I heard the album 5 years later, I had just found out Rush were a 3 piece and was amazed that 3 people could produce such a big sound.

Subdivisions still ranks as one of my favoutite Rush tracks, showcasing Neil Peart's drumming in particular (especially in the closing bars of the song).

As a bass player, I reveled in learing how ton play the bass part in Analog Kid - from the start, this is a tour de force for both bass and guitar. I cannot understand why people complain about the guitars on this album - the solo on Analog Kid is one of Lifeson's best ever, and even now I can hear the passion and rawness of that solo that would leave many guitarist's going back to the drawing board.

Chemistry has Lee, Lifeson and Peart on an equall footing, but, again, I have to say, listen to Lifeson's guitar in this - the playing is full of emotion.

Digital Man - listen to this, then listen to The Police's Walking On The Moon, and you can tell who and what Rush were listening too at the time (I love the police too, and Peart could have done much worse than study the playing of Stewart Copeland...but anyway, this isn't a Police review).

The Weapon starts with an evil disco drum and synth part, and has some of the darkest lyrics Neil Peart has ever written...which might have indicated his mood at the time, I don't know.
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