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Shroud for a Nightingale Audio CD – Audiobook, 7 Mar 2013

4.0 out of 5 stars 81 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: AudioGO Limited (7 Mar. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1471329488
  • ISBN-13: 978-1471329487
  • Product Dimensions: 13.9 x 2.3 x 16.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (81 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 424,183 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"People"

P. D. James is "the greatest living mystery writer."



"Time"

The reigning mistress of murder.



"Time" The reigning mistress of murder.

"People" P. D. James is "the greatest living mystery writer." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

Set in the medical world of hospitals and nursing schools in London, the fourth Adam Dalgliesh mystery Shroud for a Nightingale is a thrilling work of detective fiction from P.D. James, the bestselling author of Death Comes to Pemberley and Children of Men. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 6 Dec. 2002
Format: Paperback
An excellant and compelling read. The author seems to be able to write an incredibly complex novel - and keep the reader hanging on until the end. Working in a hospital myself, it is obvious that the story was very well researched and brings back the old memories of Schools of Nursing! As the plot thickens, I think that even the most seasoned of crime readers would not be able to solve this one alone!
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By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 29 July 2016
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the fourth book in the Adam Dalgliesh series. I have recently been re-reading these novels and, although I have enjoyed the previous books, this certainly represents a seeming increase in ability and confidence in the writing and storyline. “Shroud for a Nightingale,” is set in a nurse training school and P D James worked for the NHS for many years, so it is an environment she would have been extremely familiar with.

The story begins with Miss Muriel Beale, an Inspector who is setting out for the day of the John Carpendar Hospital inspection. Her first impression, on arriving at the impressive Nightingale House, is that it is highly unsuitable for a nurse training school. However, the inspection begins with a demonstration by the student nurses and, during this, there is a death. When another student nurse is killed, Adam Dalgliesh is called in to solve the crimes.

This is an assured mystery, with a closed community and a great cast of characters; from the arrogant surgeon, Mr Stephen Courtney Briggs to super efficient matron, Mary Taylor and the Sisters and Nurses who live and work in Nightingale House. There is little privacy in Nightingale House and Dalgliesh soon gets to hear of the affairs, petty squabbles and secrets that abound in the hospital. As he delves into the past of the inhabitants of Nightingale House, he uncovers the truth, and James gives us an assured, intelligent mystery with a great range of suspects and motives.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the fourth Adam Dalgliesh book, published in 1971, and the first I read. It was the beginning of a love affair with PD James and following her recent death, I decided to re-read them all.
The Nightingale in question is not Florence but Nightingale House, a nursing school at John Carpendar Hospital, Heatheringfield. At a student demonstration of patient feeding by intra-gastric tube, the nurse who substitutes as the patient dies a ghastly death. It is assumed to be an accident. When a second student nurse is found dead in her bed, her whisky nightcap the assumed culprit, Adam Dalgliesh is called in from Scotland Yard.
Like all James detective books, this is a complex mixture of observation of human behaviour, intricate plotting, detailed description, and totally believable characters. This is how Alderman Kealey is introduced, he, “looked as perky as a terrier. He was a ginger-haired, foxy little man, bandy as a jockey and wearing a plaid suit, the awfulness of its pattern emphasized by the excellence of its cut. It gave him an anthropomorphic appearance, like an animal in a children’s comic; and Dalgliesh almost expected to find himself shaking a paw.”
The brooding Victorian pile which is Nightingale House, set amongst woods which are rumoured to be haunted, is an atmospheric setting for a murder story involving young emotional women. So when there are more attacks and a fire, it somehow seems inevitable given the setting.
Did I work out the identity of the murderer? I had an early suspicion which I then forgot as I became involved in the various possibilities which Dalgliesh explores. PD James’s books are not formula whodunits, this story incorporates medical procedure, World War Two, ballroom dancing, blackmail. The story twists and turns as we see events unfold through different points of view though whether the truth is being withheld we do not know until the end.
Read more of my book reviews at http://www.sandradanby.com/book-reviews-a-z/
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Format: Audio CD Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Originally published in 1971, this is the fourth Adam Dalgleish novel from the pen of P.D. James. Two trainee nurses are killed in quick succession at a country training hospital, one in front of all her class mates. Dalgleish of the Yard is called in to solve the murders. A simple set up, but James' writing and plotting makes this an absolute joy. The story is multilayered, with a plethora of well drawn characters who may or may not have done it. We follow Dalgleish and Sergeant Masterson as they peel back the layers of obfuscation to get to the root of the mystery. James throws in a few red herrings, and by the end of the bok I had been convinced at one time or another that every single main character had done it. There was a point I was even starting to suspect Dalgleish!

James writes in an erudite fashion and with an obvious love of language. There were a couple of times I had to get a dictionary as her vocabulary is far greater than mine! She draws characters and situations vividly, and in a few of the big set pieces I was hanging on the edge of my chair. Her characters, and the way she describes their thoughts and motivations, are beautifully put across. Dalgleish in particular is a great creation, and it is interesting to see him through both his own eyes and those of people around him. It's a well written mystery which I was sorry to come to the end of.

Michael Jayston's reading is simply masterly. I have to confess to having been a fan of his since I saw him playing the Valeyard in Dr Who more years ago than I care to admit to. His voice is deep and full of colour, with a richness that makes this reading so easy on the ears.
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