• RRP: £16.99
  • You Save: £3.29 (19%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Shrill: Notes from a Loud... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman Hardcover – 19 May 2016

4.1 out of 5 stars 39 customer reviews

See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£13.70
£8.68 £2.85
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

Great Discounts
Shop the Books Outlet. Discover some great deals on top titles. Shop now
£13.70 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special offers and product promotions


Frequently bought together

  • Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman
  • +
  • Animal: The Autobiography of a Female Body
Total price: £18.19
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Quercus (19 May 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1784295523
  • ISBN-13: 978-1784295523
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 2.6 x 24.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 146,754 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

A warm, capacious and funny writer (Guardian)

This is a feminist, empowering book; I cried the whole way through though it's very funny as well ... It's nice to read something that you know would have changed your life for ever if you'd read it when you were 16 (Sofie Hagen Observer)

This important, brutally honest book makes for a hilarious read (Buzzfeed)

Lindy West is an essential (and hilarious) voice for women. Her talent and bravery have made the Internet a place I actually want to be. (Lena Dunham)

it is a powerful and frequently furious declaration of West's right to exist and be heard (i)

A call-to-arms for any woman who feels like she can't find her voice (Red)

Brilliant and brave (Sunday Independent)

The new feminist bible (Stylist)

Standout . . . screamingly funny (The Pool)

It's very very funny... it was a really enjoyable memoir but very disquieting too. (Nine to Noon, Radio NZ)

For the vast number of women who have struggled to accept their bodies as they are, West's memoir will offer numerous fist-pump moments. (New Zealand Listener)

If you've ever been labelled with a condescending big-girl euphemism such as "bubbly" or "exuberant" . . . you will laugh your chubby head off at West's book (Weekend West 2016-06-11)

Shrill is a gutsy, whip-smart and fierce demonstration of the importance and the cost of speaking out (Canberra Times, Sydney Morning Herald, The Saturday Age 2016-06-18)

Fun and feisty (Fabulous)

She reveals the obstacles she has encountered in challenging the status quo. (City Messenger 2016-08-24)

Book Description

A laugh-out-loud feminist memoir from one of the boldest new voices online.

See all Product description

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I'd never heard of Lindy West, but I was won by the cover recommendations and an article I read in praise of her work by Caitlin Moran. Shrill is basically the story of Lindy West learning to love the things about herself that she was conditioned to find disgusting, her femininity, her periods, her body and her fat. She talks frankly about these issues with a great deal of humour and integrity. The last sections of the book deal with her interactions with a bunch of male comedians about rape jokes and rape culture, and this was pretty powerful, as was her account of interviewing a man who trolled her in the guise of her dead father. It's pretty hard hitting in places, funny in others, always thoughtful and well reasoned and it made me angry and a bit hopeful.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I must say up front that reviewing this book is a little difficult for me. It is just far too close to the bone to be properly objective. I see from other reviews that I am in a minority in loving this book, but I did. In fact, I more than loved it. I felt that my identification with so many of the stories meant I felt like I lived it, and I came out the other side having absorbed a bit of Lindy West's courage, confidence, and outrage.

I too am a fat, funny, feminist woman. I happen to be American, but I've lived more of my life in the UK so I don't really think the shared geography enters into it. I would not write in the same tone as Lindy uses, because it's her own voice, but how she says what she says matters much less to me than the content. Starting with a chapter on menstruation may well be off-putting for lot of readers, and yes, West is vulgar in many of her descriptions. But for me the book just got better and better.

I'm not keen on the word "Shrill", especially its gender connotations (has a man ever been described as shrill??) but I can see why Lindy has reclaimed it. She is strident, she will grate on people - because that's what happens when you point out truths that will be uncomfortable for many (a fact highlighted beautifully in the chapter where West discusses her employer's anti-fat stance). This is a book that I wish everyone would read, as West has so bravely laid bare her vulnerabilities in order to show people what it's like to live in a world where one is constantly judged.
Read more ›
2 Comments 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I was sent this book pre-publication by Real Readers to review. I have to confess that before it plopped through the door I hadn't heard of Lindy West. I don't often read autobiographical books, I prefer fiction - but I was intrigued by the 'blurb' about a feminist, fat (and this is the word that Lindy prefers to use) writer. The book builds up to talking about more recent times in Lindy's life where she consolidated her feminist beliefs and campaigned against the rape culture in standup comedy. She also wrote openly about fat shaming, periods and abortion - still very controversial subjects. As a result of speaking out both in interviews and online she was set upon by internet trolls who stalked her and sent her lots of horrific messages and threats.

The most interesting chapter of the book for me was the one where she contacted one of the worst trolls directly and challenged him about why he was abusing her. A conversation followed in which they discussed the reasons for his behaviour. Although they weren't completely unexpected (overweight unattractive misogynist man abuses straight talking fat woman for being confident and outspoken) I thought she was so brave to approach him and tackle the issue head on. In a nutshell it's not an easy read - Lindy has very strong views and I found her outspoken nature quite unsettling at times - but it taught me a thing or two about how it really is to be very overweight and be treated like a pariah by some sections of society.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Lindy West's autobiographical 'Shrill' is unapologetic in its frankness. It comes recommended by Caitlin Moran and Lena Durham so I was encouraged from the off but West's writing was still surprising in its originality. From early details about West's life, her family and how as a girl she was a shy, retiring girl, the book soon moves to its main focus: feminism. With details from her life, West reveals what it's like to be a woman on the internet today. She discusses the fat-shaming that has until recently been accepted as the 'funny' and what it's like to be on the receiving end of keyboard warriors. West does not shy away from detail and I am sure there are people who would like to get mad reading this book and if they did so, they'd be proving much of what West says to be true. For it seems the people mad with West for being her, for not conforming to an ideal that is unrealistic, are deeply unhappy themselves. And if that sounds contrite, read how she deals with the horrendous online abuse she is subjected to each and every day. One particular moment she shares from her life is when an internet troll used her dead father's picture and bio to berate her online. West doesn't surrender to this bullying, instead she addresses it via an online article and ultimately is able to speak to the man behind it. He apologises.
West doesn't just rant about the misogynists or the fat-shamers but actually, although she may argue she doesn't, attempts to understand them with a humanity that I'm not sure many of them deserve. (West is clearly a better person than I am.) She writes with an authentic and engaging voice; she's funny and brave. There were moments when reading Shrill that I got angry, not with West but with the internet and people, really.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews