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Shorty & Doc

Shorty & Doc

1 Jan 1994
4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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  • Sample this album
    Title by Artist
    0:00 / 0:00
1
10:55
Album Only
2
5:13
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3
4:53
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4
7:39
Album Only
5
6:39
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6
7:35
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 1994
  • Release Date: 15 Nov. 2006
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: ℗© 1994 Fantasy, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 42:54
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KGG2AK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 683,348 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

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Format: Audio CD
Admittedly, this nice 1961 LP - CD does start on the hottest number (Chittlin') and doesn't sustain the heeth... But both "Shorty" Baker (one of the Ellingtonians) and Cheatham (in future becoming a major elder statesman of jazz) play really fine, in spite of Walter Bishop's piano being somewhat lost between the stars of the album and his own musical proclivities (he WAS one of the Charlie Parker+s pianists)...

All in all, a good listening experience, although not really essential. If you believe all sorts of jazz guides I consulted (Rough Guide, All Music), Cheatham actually improved in years following this date, so I'll probably check into that. For Baker, who was the more famous one when this was recorded, there are no other small band albums mentioned in the sources I consulted, so this is a special project for him...
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not essential, but there are some aspects of this album that keep me coming back to it 28 Jan. 2016
By Mike Tarrani - Published on Amazon.com
I personally love this album, and not just for the music. I also love the way it reaches back with the combined influences picked up by both Baker and Cheatham who were born when Buddy Bolden was still alive and jazz (or the beginnings of it) was migrating north. Granted, other reviewers who rated this less highly than me are just as valid, and if you want to judge this solely on musicianship and arrangements they are more on the mark than I am.

In both Baker and Cheatham I can hear influences of ragtime, blues and swing - especially the latter coming out of Baker's horn. However, it's Cheatham who brings more blues to the mix, and who has more complex influences since he was born in 1905 - nine years before Baker. The other musicians are really in a subordinate role as a rhythm section providing a foundation for the two trumpets. They are led by Walter Bishop Jr. on piano, Wendell Marshall on bass and J.C. Heard on drums. Heard, in particular, is a lynchpin of sorts because he was born in 1917 and had absorbed a lot of the music from Baker and Cheatham's era, while establishing himself in swing and blues (and bebop to an extent.)

Run through the sound samples on this page to get a feel for the music and sound quality (which is very good). Again, judging this strictly on the music is subjective, but if you love to pick out influences and hear echoes from earlier days of jazz this is an intriguing album. It was recorded for Prestige's Swingville label at Rudy van Gelder's Englewood Cliffs, NJ studio on January 17, 1961.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars For trumpet fans 17 Jan. 2009
By Nikica Gilic - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Admittedly, this nice 1961 LP - CD does start on the hottest number (Chittlin') and doesn't sustain the heeth... But both "Shorty" Baker (one of the Ellingtonians) and Cheatham (in future becoming a major elder statesman of jazz) play really fine, in spite of Walter Bishop's piano being somewhat lost between the stars of the album and his own musical proclivities (he WAS one of the Charlie Parker+s pianists)...

All in all, a good listening experience, although not really essential. If you believe all sorts of jazz guides I consulted (Rough Guide, All Music), Cheatham actually improved in years following this date, so I'll probably check into that. For Baker, who was the more famous one when this was recorded, there are no other small band albums mentioned in the sources I consulted, so this is a special project for him...
4.0 out of 5 stars Two masters of the trumpet go head to head. 25 Jun. 2014
By Mr. P. Campbell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Shorty Baker's talent twinkled only occasionally whilst he was part of the Duke Ellington Orchestra. On this CD, he get the chance to stretch out a little and cross swords with the great Doc Cheatham. You judge who came out on top.
3.0 out of 5 stars jam session 29 Dec. 2009
By D. Perrine - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Some excellent players here and all in good form but, like so many Prestige dates, it has a thrown together quality. A generic three chord blues credited to the producer takes up almost 1/4 of the playing time. The session would have benefited from a greater variety of material and some arrangements. Highlights are Shorty's beautiful rendition of "I Didn't Know..." and J.C. Heard's drumming throughout.
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Old Timers Prevail 5 Feb. 2001
By Raymond E. Wilson - Published on Amazon.com
You just can't beat the majority of jazz issued in the 60's. Although not a big trumpet fan, these old timers just like Henry "Red" Allen could blow. This is a loose blowing session that strolls along at a nice pace.Keep your eye opened for Fantasy reissues in the bargain bin, there is some great stuff there for "moldy figs". The 60's were the times of great jazz, the 70"s for contemporary, the 80"s for country. After that things went to hell
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