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The Shelters of Stone (Random House Large Print) Hardcover – Large Print, 1 Apr 2002

3.4 out of 5 stars 128 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 1216 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Large Print Publishing; Lrg edition (April 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375431748
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375431746
  • Product Dimensions: 16.8 x 6 x 24.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (128 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,240,842 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Praise for the Earth's Children (tm) series:
"A powerful story . . . Auel is a highly imaginative writer."
--"The New York Times Book Review"
"Pure entertainment at its sublime, wholly exhilarating best."
--"Los Angeles Times"
"Auel may be creating one of the most believable characters in English fiction--one to rank with Sherlock Holmes, Scarlett O'Hara and a handful of others."
--"UPI?"

"From the Trade Paperback edition."

Praise for the Earth's Children (tm) series:
" A powerful story . . . Auel is a highly imaginative writer."
--"The New York Times Book Review"
" Pure entertainment at its sublime, wholly exhilarating best."
--"Los Angeles Times"
" Auel may be creating one of the most believable characters in English fiction--one to rank with Sherlock Holmes, Scarlett O'Hara and a handful of others."
--"UPI?"

"From the Trade Paperback edition."

" A powerful story . . . Auel is a highly imaginative writer." -- "The New York Times Book Review
"
" Pure entertainment at its sublime, wholly exhilarating best." -- "Los Angeles Times"
" Auel may be creating one of the most believable characters in English fiction-- one to rank with Sherlock Holmes, Scarlett O'Hara and a handful of others." -- "UPI"

"A powerful story . . . Auel is a highly imaginative writer." The New York Times Book Review

"Pure entertainment at its sublime, wholly exhilarating best." Los Angeles Times
"Auel may be creating one of the most believable characters in English fiction one to rank with Sherlock Holmes, Scarlett O'Hara and a handful of others." UPI" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The long-awaited fifth book in the hugely successful Earth's Children (R) series --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This must be the longest I have ever waited for the next book in a series. I bought the first one in 1984 when I left home for university, got absolutely hooked and avidly read them as they appeared, including The Plains of Passage, which was the last one in 1990. If I have to wait another twelve years for the next book in the series, I'll be nearly fifty and will have spent thirty years on this story.
So was it worth it and will I be anticipating the next book as eagerly? I'm not so sure. Oh, I'll read it - I have grown very fond of the heroine, but I found this book somewhat of a letdown. It mostly feels like scene-setting for the next book, and half the content seems to be retelling of the four books before (something that was already starting to irritate in The Plains of Passage, together with the too-dry lectures on flora, fauna and geography). Yes, the new people Ayla lives with need to know about her life, but it could have been done better. Jean Auel should really trust her readers more to know what has already happened - after all, we have had twelve years to read the story again and again. Compared to the scope of the plot in the earlier books, this is a bit feeble.
But I still want to know how it all ends. Meet you all at my fiftieth birthday party.
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Format: Hardcover
This volume of the story has a different tone than the other books do. There isn't the same tension and conflict as in the other books, since they have completed their Journey safely, and they are now committed to each other romantically, etc, and this gives the story a different, more relaxed tempo. There's still a mass of repetition, where the happy couple get to rehash all the things they've learned for the folks back home, and even though there are no Clan in this one, they are much talked about, and that means explanations of their memories--again, again. Ayla makes some enemies among her new people, but don't worry, she's still perfect, and the important people love her to death.
That said, I actually enjoyed this book, and more when I read it again recently after a few years. It's nice to have a slightly more in depth acquaintance with this group of people, like with the Mamutoi in the Mammoth Hunters, and it's nice to "meet" Jondalar's family, who have been hinted about since book nr. 2, and nice to know that these characters will continue to feature in the story, unlike all the other characters we've met up until now.
Ayla's wacky dreams and supernatural powers, which haven't said that much to me personally up to this point, begin to take a more central role in the story. Strangely enough, this is one area of Ayla's life that the author *hasn't* re-hashed and explained to death, and has chosen to let remain slightly mysterious, which makes it more effective now. As far as I know there is supposed to be a sixth book, and (SPOILER?) things seem to be pointing in the direction that number 6 will be concerned with our heroine's spiritual/shamanic development, and maybe some kind of reconciliation with the Clan? So despite the change of pace, I'm looking forward to the next installment.
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Format: Hardcover
I really, really wanted to love this book.

I have read the previous four at least 8 times each, averaging one or two volumes every 18 months over the past 20 years. With the latest release I have realised that the main joy of the previous volumes was Ayla's continual discoveries and innovations in survival situations. There are no discoveries in Shelters of Stone except for a limestone cave. An empty limestone cave. An empty limestone cave with blank white walls, perhaps the perfect symbol for this entire book. But that's only the start of the problems.

There was so much wasted potential here, so many, many plotlines that could have been explored, if only Ms Auel's passion had been present during the writing of it, but I'll get to that theory in a moment.

This book hurt to read, and it was irritating and finally it made me angry. I feel very let down. In an ordered list, here's why:

1. Throughout the previous three books, Jondalar made frequent references to his mother's mate, Willomar. In SoS, it was spelled Willamar. The first time I read it I thought I had found the first typo. After the 75th time, it was like getting popped with hot bacon fat. The author has been quoted as saying she changed the spelling because she felt it was more in keeping with how the character would have spelled his name. My question is, why is spelling an issue when it regards people who have no written language?

2. The instant Ms. Auel seemed to be flirting with a dramatic scene or actual character development, she interrupted-Sometimes In The Very Midst Of A Conversation(!)-with a page and a half treatise on why a certain oil might be used for a stone lamp...

3.
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Format: Hardcover
I don't really need to say that I've been waiting for this book, do I? Like everyone else addicted to the series I was thrilled to find it was coming out, and I'm still pleased that it was written, even though I mourn the lack of a copy-editor's big red pencil. Perhaps JK Rowling will have the same problem with her next book--that editors reverently accept the new book, grateful that it's been written at last,and don't dare change a word, or a phrase, because of her reputation.
This approach, if this is what happened, does Jean Auel no service. It's still interesting to read all about Ayla's introduction to Jondalar's people, but there is no real narrative grip here, as with the rest of the series, perhaps because there is no central problem to be solved (I'm sorry, but her worries about being a working mother just don't substitute).
I loved the details about survival in the earlier books--here, for the first time, we hear nothing about these. Whereas in the previous books we learned minute details of life that helped to characterise the people, here even Ayla's cooking skills, her special way of preparing Ptarmigan, for instance, aren't mentioned. Once she actually catches the bird, but there is no follow-up about her cooking it. I was looking forward to Jondalar's mother being impressed by her weird and wonderful herbal skills.
Perhaps I malign the editors, perhaps they did cut it, because though on the one hand it looks rambling and woolly, on the other hand it looks as though great chunks have been missed out. There are continuity problems in part. The Zelandoni are not as closely characterised as other peoples have been, and everyone seems incredibly tolerant and liberal.
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