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Shaman's Drum by [Abraham, Ailsa]
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Shaman's Drum Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

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Length: 191 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 490 KB
  • Print Length: 191 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Crooked Cat Publishing (5 Jan. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00AXM6CAM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #584,247 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Shaman's Drum is a futuristic 'what if?' scenario - what if there were no religious organisations? How would people be protected from the demonic? What if two people from opposing doctrines fell in love? What would be their penultimate power? Riga and Iamo - two beautifully painted characters - show us that the strength of love and belief can transcend all the evils of the world and beyond. I loved the magic, the paganism, the shamanism, and above all a darned good story well told. This is a highly readable and fascinating book. Recommended!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A truly wonderful and gripping read. Would suggest reading the prequel Alchemy (http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1909841501/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_FY1uub1YCPM4H) first though if you can.
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Format: Paperback
This was an engrossing and entertaining novel. I know nothing about Shamanism, Paganism - or indeed the other `new' religions created in the futuristic story of Shaman's Drum - but that didn't diminish my reading enjoyment. Riga (a Black Shaman) and Iamo ( White Monk of the Goddess) launch the reader straight into the dilemma they face as `top dogs' in their dissimilar lifestyles. The use of first person made me immediately empathise with them. The contrast between white and black magic practitioners in Shaman's Drum is interestingly portrayed. There is good in the bad - and there is very bad - but what rings true from the very beginning is that love transcends all opposition and barriers. Impossible restrictions are overcome, though some compromise is necessary. True life is definitely reflected in Shaman's Drum. Two believers of dissimilar cults finding a meeting ground for a future happy life of love and respect takes some conciliation. The flashback technique made me want to read the prequel to this novel to discover why they met in the first place, and what that first battle with the demons was all about.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An interesting scenario, eliminating all religions in the interests of getting rid of terrorism. What will people think of next? And yet, for some I suppose the theory could hold credibility.

Riga and Iamo (lovely names) - sensual from the first scene. The forces of darkness and light melding in psychic love to overcome the demons which threaten the world. There is dark and light in us all.

I enjoy the occasional lapses into ornery speech.
`Cheeky sod even tried to pretend he thought I was a man.'
And `I don't work with gods much but I would never willingly piss one off.'

We all have secret thoughts which never see the light of day. The Shaman dares to bring them forth.

But this book doesn't start at the beginning. I feel the need to discover what went on before, in more than mere glimpses.

Some subtlely wicked humour creeps in, to lighten the sense of doom and disaster. But I am out of my depth, reading this book. I can't stop at every other page to look up the references. It would spoil the flow. Then I'm blown away with enlightenment at the explanation of the different levels of magical protection, like cloaking and shape-shifting.

Now I am engaged, and the story races along in absorbing fashion to its dramatic climax at Glastonbury. And on to a more conventional denouement, where love, good deeds and procreation win through.
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Format: Paperback
This is a good fantasy tale of relationships set in the near future when our organised religions were banned, eventually replaced by paganism and magic. Civilisation is still as we know it, complete with Internet and mobile phones, cars and taxis, but without the angst of religious guilt or conflict. Needless to say, without conflict there is no story. And of course even in a supposedly ideal world there is still crime, jealousy, and a lust for power. Cleverly, how this state of affairs came about is not revealed in detail - save that there was a War of Religion, and most people are now non-committed; we'll get to know more in the prequel. We begin this book with all of the above a given.

The author was a pagan and elevated to High Priestess in a coven before leaving to follow a solo course as a shaman. She is a healer and practices Reiki in her village in France.

Brother Iamo and Shaman Riga have a history, again to be detailed in the prequel; however, this doesn't detract from the story. In effect, we're into the tale running, without any great exposition on their past involvement. This works, due to the charisma of Iamo and Riga - the narrative is first person, from the intermittent point of view of each.

It's as if opposites attract. They're from different sects - Riga is a captain of the Black Shamanic Guild, an assassin, while Iamo is a priest of the Mother Goddess of Light. And such attraction displeases the hierarchy. However, the pair proved themselves very capable when they previously went up against the common enemy, demons.

The new conflict - demons destroy both mentally and physically, `eating the soul piece by piece'. Worse, they seem to be up against the Demon Prince, men-hating Dianics and men-only Gythi as well.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As with all fantasy novels, the starting point is to suspend disbelief but, as with all good fantasy novels, this suspension of disbelief leads us, via a journey through the unexpected, to insights into the real world in which we live. The starting premise is the aftermath of a "war of religion" arising from a "war on terrorism," and at the end of which "organised religion" is banned. Time and place are unspecified, expect that a visit to Glastonbury features, and doesn't involve a flight or sea-journey, so we must presumably be in Britain. The religions "banned" are specifically "those that proselytised," "those that made war," and "those that used terrorism," and seem to include Christianity, Judaism, Islam and Buddhism. Their place is taken by various forms of paganism (including druidism, the cults of Ra & Isis, Diana and Odin, which seem rapidly to have become as sectarian and as rigidly organised as the religions of the modern or ancient worlds have ever been. The world conjured up is at once familiar and unfamiliar, a world in which shamanistic shape-shifting and dark magic coexist with limousines, pizza parlours, showers and sofas, providing much potential for humour, sensuality and adventure, but also for reflection on the human proclivity for dividing one group against another, and the question of whether this can be overcome through love.
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