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Shakespeare's Lost Kingdom: The True History of Shakespeare and Elizabeth Paperback – 27 Jan 2011

4.4 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Grove Press / Atlantic Monthly Press; Reprint edition (27 Jan. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802145388
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802145383
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.3 x 22.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 261,464 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Praise for"Shakespeare's Lost Kingdom"
"An intriguing book that proposes another forceful argument in this age old debate. Beauclerk's detailed exploration divides the mythical notions from the historical truths. You will have a hard time putting this book down." --Roland Emmerich
"Beauclerk's learned, deep scholarship, compelling research, engaging style and convincing interpretation won me completely. He has made me view the whole Elizabethan world afresh. The plays glow with new life, exciting and real, infused with the soul of a man too long denied his inheritance." --Sir Derek Jacobi
"This is a book for anyone who loves Shakespeare. No matter who you think may have created the works of Shakespeare, the Earl of Oxford's mysterious life, and that of his Queen, must be near the heart and source of the creation. Three cheers for Mr. Beauclerk's daring to explore one of the most scandalous and potentially revolutionary theories about the authorship of these immorta

Praise for "Shakespeare's Lost Kingdom"
"An intriguing book that proposes another forceful argument in this age old debate. Beauclerk's detailed exploration divides the mythical notions from the historical truths. You will have a hard time putting this book down." --Roland Emmerich
"Beauclerk's learned, deep scholarship, compelling research, engaging style and convincing interpretation won me completely. He has made me view the whole Elizabethan world afresh. The plays glow with new life, exciting and real, infused with the soul of a man too long denied his inheritance." --Sir Derek Jacobi
"This is a book for anyone who loves Shakespeare. No matter who you think may have created the works of Shakespeare, the Earl of Oxford's mysterious life, and that of his Queen, must be near the heart and source of the creation. Three cheers for Mr. Beauclerk's daring to explore one of the most scandalous and potentially revolutionary theories about the authorship of these immortal works."--Mark Rylance, First Artistic Director of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre
"An extraordinary and controversial interpretation of Shakespeare's origins, which certainly provokes much thought. A radical analysis of Shakespeare's text, leading to a conclusion which is bound to amaze the reader and the scholar. Who was Shakespeare?" --Steven Berkoff
"Captivating . . . Beauclerk writes persuasively, mixing history with quotes from Shakespeare's works in a style that's far from the overly-academic manner you might expect for such a detailed literary and historical analysis. As the pieces of his theory come together, even the most ardent adherent to "Stratfordian mythology" (that a lowly son of a glove-maker from Stratford-upon-Avon was Shakespeare) may find themselves having second thoughts. Why does it matter if de Vere wrote the plays and poems? If so, it would provide a whole second level of meaning to them. All those characters with double identities form de Vere's au

Praise for "Shakespeare's Lost Kingdom"
An intriguing book that proposes another forceful argument in this age old debate. Beauclerk s detailed exploration divides the mythical notions from the historical truths. You will have a hard time putting this book down. Roland Emmerich
Beauclerk s learned, deep scholarship, compelling research, engaging style and convincing interpretation won me completely. He has made me view the whole Elizabethan world afresh. The plays glow with new life, exciting and real, infused with the soul of a man too long denied his inheritance. Sir Derek Jacobi
This is a book for anyone who loves Shakespeare. No matter who you think may have created the works of Shakespeare, the Earl of Oxford s mysterious life, and that of his Queen, must be near the heart and source of the creation. Three cheers for Mr. Beauclerk s daring to explore one of the most scandalous and potentially revolutionary theories about the authorship of these immortal works. Mark Rylance, First Artistic Director of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre
An extraordinary and controversial interpretation of Shakespeare's origins, which certainly provokes much thought. A radical analysis of Shakespeare's text, leading to a conclusion which is bound to amaze the reader and the scholar. Who was Shakespeare? Steven Berkoff
Captivating . . . Beauclerk writes persuasively, mixing history with quotes from Shakespeare's works in a style that's far from the overly-academic manner you might expect for such a detailed literary and historical analysis. As the pieces of his theory come together, even the most ardent adherent to Stratfordian mythology (that a lowly son of a glove-maker from Stratford-upon-Avon was Shakespeare) may find themselves having second thoughts. Why does it matter if de Vere wrote the plays and poems? If so, it would provide a whole second level of meaning to them. All those characters with double identities form de Vere's autobiography as he tries to find his place in the world as a bastard, fool, and crownless king. Kevin Lauderdale, "Author Magazine""

About the Author

Charles Beauclerk is a writer, lecturer, and historian. A descendant of Edward de Vere, he is the founder of the De Vere Society, former president of the Shakespeare Oxford Society, and trustee of the Shakespeare Authorship Trust. He is also the author of Nell Gwyn: Mistress to a King.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In his 2010 book on the Shakespeare authorship question (Contested Will) James Shapiro resorted to the banishment of biography as a tactic in the ongoing Shakespeare authorship debate, in effect saying that the life the author lived has little bearing on understanding his work. Yet, in his latest effort (1606: Shakespeare and the Year of Lear) he swerves back to trying (somehow, someway) to give the man from Stratford some sort of life that aligns with the plays and poems of Shakespeare. As Shapiro himself acknowledged in a recent interview on his “Year of Lear” book tour the whole point of his current book is an attempt to “know” Shakespeare.

Meanwhile, among Oxfordians (i.e. those who advocate that Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, was the true Shakespeare) knowing Shakespeare is not a problem, not at all. In Edward de Vere readers will find a real-life Elizabethan Hamlet, and the historical record is full of associations between the author and his work (e.g., Oxford’s 1575-1576 tour of Italy). Still, among the numerous Oxfordian works in recent years that mine this historical record perhaps none is more insightful and more provocative than Charles Beauclerk and his 2010 book, Shakespeare's Lost Kingdom. In SLK Beauclerk takes the biographical point of view to what some may consider its furthest limits, where even some of his fellow Oxfordians hesitate to go.

In a nutshell, Beauclerk posits that the mysterious greatness of Shakespeare (i.e., his genius) is bound up in the author's psyche, that the works don't just reveal the humdrum details of the author's life and travels, but go far beyond that to reveal the inmost parts of the author himself. Beauclerk's book is not another argument in the authorship debate.
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While Beauclerk provides many thought provoking insights into the playwright's obsessions and illuminates the plays and sonnets in a revolutionary way, he does tend to over egg the pudding with some flights of fancy that rather spoil the effect at times. It does rather put to shame anyone who believes the plays aren't autobiographical and the themes of lost identity, illegitimacy and incest show the author, whoever he was, to have been a deeply troubled and complex character. Beauclerk also explains convincingly the degree to which Oxford was a patron of literature and the Arts from the 1570s and could well have played a significant, if not leading, role in the English renaissance. He alsoshows that Stratfordians like Nelson, should look at the contemporary regard in which Oxford was held and his high reputation as a writer and let go of Ur-Hamlets. There is really very little doubt that Oxford produced, perhaps jointly, an impressive body of early work, some of it suspiciously like early versions of later Shake-speare works. I get uncomfortable about the double whammy conjecture of Oxford as Elizabeth's son and later lover and possible Wriothesley offspring. It is tantalising and perhaps just feasible but does stretch belief even if there are some fascinating clues in the text. Wouldn't it just be wonderful !
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Format: Paperback
Not being a Shakespearean myself and not having studied the authorship question, I was pleasantly surprised by the extent to which this book gives a coherent and psychologically plausible account of Shakespeare's life and works. This includes his negotiation of the political pitfalls of the time. Both he and Elizabeth stand out as complete human beings, which is often not the case in more traditional histories of the period, and their harrowing story is told without judgment. A fascinating and unpredictable read!
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Format: Paperback
It makes sense that the lives of Queen Elizabeth I and Shakespeare, the twin geniuses of the age, should depend on each other, even though they have been little more than ships in the night in conventional histories of the age. With Beauclerk's radically different approach, we can at last understand them as a unity and both the plays and the times are illuminated as a result. Highly recommended.
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Format: Paperback
Sir Derek Jacobi has written of this book that Beauclerk ‘has made me view the whole Elizabethan world afresh’. Whatever one’s view of Beauclerk’s conclusions, there is no denying the freshness and originality of his perspective.

The author first introduced me to Charlton Ogburn’s, 'Mysterious William Shakespeare' opening to me the “Oxfordian” appreciation of Shakespeare. I have only now, through this book, come to appreciate the deeper levels of force in effect behind the creation of the works of Shakespeare.

Beauclerk's book is spellbinding and his premise is compelling. Beauclerk puts his hypothesis and then leads the reader thoughtfully through its ramifications. This skillful approach leads the reader through a new experience of “Shakespeare” reframed and grounded in Edward de Vere and the context of the realities of power and the structure of Elizabeth I’s court as the creative center.

The vision from Beauclerk’s fact-based perspective compels the reader, inspires us to want more- more understanding of the plays and poems and wanting truth from ‘received’ Elizabethan history.

The examination of the biography of Edward de Vere and his life prizes open the Shakespeare legend and a new world of understanding becomes available.

Some of most powerful revelations arise around the sonnets these most personal, mysterious, painful and emotional of all Shakespeare's works. Clearly his late works - the writing of an older man to his son and his lost love.

Beauclerk’s exegesis is crucial to understanding the sonnets' emotional and aesthetic power. A nearly universal acceptance of “academic experts” keeps this forever out of reach of Stratfordians. Beauclerk leads the reader to understand who the “players” are and the real story is only then able to unfold.

Beauclerk's literary analysis is the best since ‘This Star of England’. Thoroughly recommended!
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