£12.42
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Sex, Work and Politics: W... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sex, Work and Politics: Women in Britain, 1830-1918 Paperback – 10 May 2012

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.42
£12.42 £17.09
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£12.42 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 482 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (10 May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 146644908X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1466449084
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.8 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,216,236 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Richard Brown was, until he retired, Head of History and Citizenship at Manshead School in Dunstable, and has published twenty-six print and Kindle books and 50 articles and papers on nineteenth century history. He is the author of a successful blog, The History Zone, which has a wide audience among pupils, students and researchers. Having completed his Rebellions Trilogy; Three Rebellions: Canada 1837-1838, South Wales 1839 and Victoria, Australia 1854, Famine, Fenians and Freedom, 1840-1882, and Resistance and Rebellion in the British Empire, 1600-1980, he has now embarked on a study of Canadian rebellion 1837-1885 and a three volume study of Chartism.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Besides research on primary sources, academics and scholars also have to reflect on available secondary sources, so as to publish syntheses meant at the general public. Richard Brown embarked on such an educational mission and his resulting Sex, Works & Politics: Women in Britain, 1830-1918 is based on a very impressive and up-to-date bibliography, whose findings and conclusions are used with a distanced, critical-enough mind, so that his essay can still be considered as original thinking.
Richard Brown writes in a very readable style, and the copious footnotes never interfere. There are occasional touches of humour or more personal remarks, so that readers can feel how much this retired teacher love to share his interests in a sincere and generous way.
Although eventually focussing on a particular approach, Brown always introduces his readers with the various historical points of views on each of the gender-related issues he tackles. The first chapter on "Positioning Women's History" is both clear and dispassionate, quite a feat in such a minefield! Starting with a study of the way women were/are represented encourages the reader to keep their own critical distance henceforward.
Brown gives pride of place to the Suffrage Question, to which he devotes three chapters out of ten. However, he did not neglect other questions, that tend to be overshadowed in less balanced essays, such as that of Victorian women's place in the economy (his third chapter). Meanwhile, the paramount importance of moral values, ideals and representations is well acknowledged, not only in the second chapter on "Re-presenting Women", but as a constant complement to resulting facts and figures.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
5.0 out of 5 stars An invaluable source of reliable information, both on Victorian women and on the way historical research has been conducted. 2 Jun. 2012
By Mme P.-B. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Besides research on primary sources, academics and scholars also have to reflect on available secondary sources, so as to publish syntheses meant at the general public. Richard Brown embarked on such an educational mission and his resulting Sex, Works & Politics: Women in Britain, 1830-1918 is based on a very impressive and up-to-date bibliography, whose findings and conclusions are used with a distanced, critical-enough mind, so that his essay can still be considered as original thinking.
Richard Brown writes in a very readable style, and the copious footnotes never interfere. There are occasional touches of humour or more personal remarks, so that readers can feel how much this retired teacher love to share his interests in a sincere and generous way.
Although eventually focussing on a particular approach, Brown always introduces his readers with the various historical points of views on each of the gender-related issues he tackles. The first chapter on "Positioning Women's History" is both clear and dispassionate, quite a feat in such a minefield! Starting with a study of the way women were/are represented encourages the reader to keep their own critical distance henceforward.
Brown gives pride of place to the Suffrage Question, to which he devotes three chapters out of ten. However, he did not neglect other questions, that tend to be overshadowed in less balanced essays, such as that of Victorian women's place in the economy (his third chapter). Meanwhile, the paramount importance of moral values, ideals and representations is well acknowledged, not only in the second chapter on "Re-presenting Women", but as a constant complement to resulting facts and figures. Finally, Brown avoids the trap of the mainly middle-class viewpoint, as all the best and latest research on Victorian working class women are there too.
Reading Sex, Works & Politics: Women in Britain, 1830-1918 made me exclaim "still true today" again and again, and I felt like exploring further some of the research Brown had to sum up. Leaving the reader both content and frustrated is the sign of a successful synthesis: I learned a lot and I want to learn even more about some of the issues I discovered.
I strongly recommend this essay to anyone interested in the Victorian era. It is an invaluable source of reliable information, both on the social status of Victorian women and on the way historical research has been conducted on an issue that is not disconnected from contemporary gender-related questions.
Was this review helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback