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Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs: A Low Culture Manifesto by [Klosterman, Chuck]
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Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs: A Low Culture Manifesto Kindle Edition

3.3 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Product Description

Review

Gary Shteyngart

author of "The Russian Debutante's Handbook"

The funniest thing I've read in an ice age...Chuck Klosterman is a Gulliver among the cult-crit Lilliputians. America should wrap her freckled arms around Klosterman's scrawny neck and press him to her bosom. He may be the last true patriot among us.



Bob Odenkirk

of "Mr. Show"

Chuck Klosterman has the time and inclination to think through the issues that you didn't even know were issues. Laugh at him, or with him, or both...but you will laugh, dammit, you will laugh.



Bob Odenkirk of Mr. Show Chuck Klosterman has the time and inclination to think through the issues that you didn't even know were issues. Laugh at him, or with him, or both...but you will laugh, dammit, you will laugh.

Gary Shteyngart author of The Russian Debutante's Handbook The funniest thing I've read in an ice age...Chuck Klosterman is a Gulliver among the cult-crit Lilliputians. America should wrap her freckled arms around Klosterman's scrawny neck and press him to her bosom. He may be the last true patriot among us.

Bob Odenkirk of "Mr. Show"Chuck Klosterman has the time and inclination to think through the issues that you didn't even know were issues. Laugh at him, or with him, or both...but you will laugh, dammit, you will laugh.

Gary Shteyngart author of "The Russian Debutante's Handbook" The funniest thing I've read in an ice age...Chuck Klosterman is a Gulliver among the cult-crit Lilliputians. America should wrap her freckled arms around Klosterman's scrawny neck and press him to her bosom. He may be the last true patriot among us.

Bob Odenkirk of "Mr. Show" Chuck Klosterman has the time and inclination to think through the issues that you didn't even know were issues. Laugh at him, or with him, or both...but you will laugh, dammit, you will laugh.

Book Description

Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs, by Chuck Klosterman, is a rebellious and entertaining cult read from a writer who truly speaks for a generation.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 903 KB
  • Print Length: 276 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0743236017
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (21 Nov. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00H122IJ6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #73,671 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
In the footsteps of Klosterman's Midwestern memoir/history of hair metal (Fargo Rock City) comes this collection of eighteen essays bearing the asterixed subtitle "A Low Culture Manifesto". The subtitle itself speaks volumes about the author's general style:a hyper-ironically witty phrase that displays a certain level of erudition along with a wink-wink, nudge-nudge. Klosterman is almost exactly my age, which means that our broad exposure pop culture exposure has been nearly identical, and while I greatly enjoyed the majority of the essays, there's a tension in his writing between wanting to make fun of low culture, and wanting to treat it seriously. It's the same tension (and flaw) of Fargo Rock City—he's writing about his guilty pleasures, but can't quite commit to the guilt or the pleasure. All that aside, I've probably recommended this book to more friends of mine than any other in recent months.
If you browse it in the store be aware that the first essay (about how John Cusak, and emo songsmiths like Coldplay have made the concept of love very tricky for Gen Xers—or at least middle-class white ones), is far and away the best in the book. Which is not to say there isn't a lot of other great stuff. The second essay, about the computer game The Sims, is hugely funny (if only slightly insightful) and the fifth (which first ran in The New York Times Magazine) is an engaging account of a weekend spent on the road with a Guns N' Roses cover band. The sixth is also quite strong, being a comparison of Pamela Anderson with Marilyn Monroe that seeks to explain how the role of celebrity has changed over the half-century between them. His essay on internet porn is brief, funny, and moderately thoughtful.
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Format: Hardcover
Although he covers wildly varied topics, Chuck Klosterman's lively, stylish collection of essays speaks for and largely to one generation: Gen X. The author focuses not just on pop culture, but instead on pop culture's detritus. He doesn't discuss the best pop culture products. Rather, he covers the random bits and pieces that interest him. Some of these subjects merit his attention, such as popular television shows like The Real World, which have shaped later genres. Some of the other topics to which Klosterman turns his intelligence, ready wit (and occasionally profane tongue) are less obviously relevant - such as the meaning of breakfast cereal ads. He would argue that it doesn't matter, that everything in a society is connected and every part of popular culture tells us something about the way of life that produced it. Even so, you could still debate just what these specific items communicate - and while Klosterman's conclusions are always entertaining, many of them are highly debatable. In the areas such as music and celebrity journalism, where he is deeply experienced, his conclusions are more convincing and his ideas are most interesting. In other areas where he seems to spin positions from a more limited perspective, he is intriguing, but much less convincing. Despite this mixed menu and mixed perspective, we recommend this clever manuscript to pleasure readers who want a fun ride through pop land and to serious readers who are trying to understand the Gen X mindset.
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Format: Paperback
There are two types of book that seem to have come on in a big way in recent years. The first is what my local bookstore calls "Tragic True Life Stories", in which authors with a tragic past tell their story. The other is collected essays and columns, as it seems that any celebrity writer with a regular newspaper column gets the chance to have them collected together in book form every so often. Unfortunately, Jeremy Clarkson seems to be the front runner in this particular sub-genre.

I don't know where the essays that make up Chuck Klosterman's "Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs" may have appeared previously, but the style of the book is certainly very similar. Klosterman doesn't seem to have a specialist subject like most, although the book is subtitled "A Low Culture Manifesto", which provides some indication of where his interests lie.

Klosterman writes on subjects which I suspect are aimed at a slightly younger audience or one more knowledgeable about popular culture than I am. He takes on more or less every aspect of life; music, film, television, sport, internet pornography and breakfast cereals. In various essays, he compares Pamela Anderson and Marilyn Monroe, explains why the Tom Cruise film "Vanilla Sky" was actually better than most film critics told us and gives the reasons why "soccer" will never take off in America.

Two things are immediately obvious in reading many of Klosterman's essays. The first is that for many of his subjects, I have absolutely no idea what he is talking about. There's a long essay based around the MTV program "The Real World", which I had only barely heard of, which was completely lost on me, although I think I followed the more general point he was trying to make.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have to agree with another reviewer that this is geared towards younger audience, under 25's perhaps but then again they'd get lot with the Real World, Guns & Roses and Julia and Lyle references etc. which were part of the late 80s early 90s lexicon.

Being of this vintage, I found the chapter on the Real World interesting. It brought back memories of a show I had loved but long forgotten. However, I was struggling to recall the characters. On to the chapter on the covers band, it was a good read and I think music is where Chuck excels. Next up was Chuck's self-psychoanalysis on his feelings for Marilyn Monroe and contrasting this with his tepid interest in Pam Anderson. What he said simply didn't resonate with me and this is what (I think) Chuck tries to do, he tries to touch on things you subconsciously feel but perhaps never expressed.

I thought the Pam Anderson/Marilyn stuff was drivel and started to skim ahead. On to the anti-soccer chapter. I played for 30 years but I accept many Americans don't get it. But Chuck clearly hasn't a clue on this topic and he lost me with his assertions 'Most children don't love soccer' and 'its the only sport where you can't f-up'. He might get away with this with a US audience but not elsewhere in the world.

There is no doubting the authors capability in turn of phrase - his fantastic choice of words. But when he devotes a page to the problem of using the metaphor 'comparing apples with oranges' I feel this discussion/book it isn't worth my time anymore.
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