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The Seventh Veil [DVD] [1945]

4.5 out of 5 stars 49 customer reviews

Price: £10.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Product details

  • Actors: James Mason, Ann Todd, Herbert Lom, Hugh McDermott, Albert Lieven
  • Directors: Compton Bennett
  • Format: Dolby, PAL
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Odeon Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 18 May 2009
  • Run Time: 89 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001CKZT44
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 14,738 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

One dark summer night, Francesca Cunningham (Ann Todd), a once world famed pianist, escapes from her hospital room and tries to commit suicide by jumping off a bridge. She is rescued and taken back to hospital to undergo psychological treatment by Dr. Larsen (Herbert Lom). Larsen, desperately wants to know the events and persons who drove her to this state and help her. He makes Francesca talk about her past with her controlling guardian, Nicholas (James Mason) who forced her to practice the piano and kept her isolated from any friendships... OSCAR winning film. This long-awaited blockbuster is the 10th most viewed film in UK Cinema History, higher than Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings! First ever DVD release. Features extensive booklet notes and a 40 minute Documentary, Home James , featuring James Mason visiting his home town of Huddersfield.

Review

Mason is as dark and brooding as always, and perfectly cast --Filmfanatic.org

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I was delighted when I saw this film had been re-released on dvd. I knew the film well and this is an excellent addition to my collection. It is a subtle story of relationships underpinned by an exploration of the effectiveness of hypnotherapy (quite something for 1947). The classical piano pieces will resonate well with non-classical lovers. A classy film with James Mason at his most love him/hate him/fear him best leading to an enigmatic ending, which will never date. I should declare an interest, my mother was Ann Todd.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
"The Seventh Veil" is the zenith of the type of psychological melodramas that hit their stride in both Britain and America at the end of WW II. Less pretentious and certainly less overwrought than Alfred Hitchcock's "Spellbound," the film takes full advantage of the eccentricities of its cast and succeeds in being a worthy watch despite its outdated psycho-babble. Ann Todd seemed to specialize in highly-strung and tightly-wrapped English roses at this point in her career, and this is the movie where the string snaps and the wrap comes undone; despite a more florid acting style than a modern audience is used to, it is to Ms. Todd's credit that she convincingly starts as a teenager and progresses to troubled adult without tricks of makeup and lighting. James Mason brings a cartload of his famous brooding to his character, and handles the role with such skill that he is both deeply attractive and repellant at the same time. Herbert Lom makes the most of his part as the psychiatrist, with a manner suggesting that even he doesn't believe half of what he says to explain his psychotherapy. Albert Lieven and Hugh McDermott both excel as bohemian love interests. Whether from financial necessity or personal taste, director Compton Bennett steered clear of many of the "twisted psyche" visual effects often used in this kind of film (which soon became terrible cliches), and as a result, the film has aged much better than its competitors.Read more ›
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Format: VHS Tape
Hate to see a good moview unreviewed. "The 7th Veil" refers to a phrase mentioned by a psychiatrist (Herbert Lom) in reference to the various depths of a psychiatrically ill pianist's mind (played by Ann Todd). The movie is told largely through flashback, and has echoes of "Intermezzo" or "The Red Shoes" in its British-sensitive handling of artists. James Mason acts brilliantly (as I believe he often did) as the pianist's (arguably) sadistic, inwardly tormented "Uncle Nicholas" who is responsible both for the pianist's talent and for her mental breakdown. If you're not hooked by this plot review, check your pulse.
Excellent movie, excellent ending. You hooked now, right?
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Format: VHS Tape
One of the most delicious thrills for many British and American moviegoers in 1946 was the unexpected sight of James Mason thwacking down his cane on the fingers of Ann Todd as she played the piano. This one scene is probably better remembered than the movie itself. The Seventh Veil was one of the first British movies to deal with psychiatry; it made a lot of money in both countries; it helped propel Mason to Hollywood; and it undoubtedly is one of the great women's melodramas in movies. Surprisingly, after more than 60 years the movie still holds up reasonably well, thanks to Mason and Todd. Please note that elements of the plot are discussed

Women's melodrama? Just hear the names of the two leads...Nicholas and Francesca. If those names don't sound like characters in a steamy Regency romance, what would? But the movie actually is a modern (from the Forties) study of a severely shy young woman's repressed need for love, and her guardian's overbearing need to live his life's dream through her and her talent as a pianist. Francesca's mother had died when she was a child. Her father placed her in a boarding school. When he died, she was 15 and was sent to live with her wealthy guardian in a large London mansion. Francesca was timid, talented at the piano, so unsure of herself at times that she could barely speak. Nicholas, probably 20 years older, was her second cousin. He lived alone in his mansion with only male servants. He was lame, brooding, controlling and a misogynist. One afternoon he learns Francesca can play the piano and slowly entices her to play for him by playing himself. As he listens to her we can see that he is recognizing a rare talent that he most likely, however competent he might be, can never equal. "He was a wonderful teacher," she later says.
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Format: DVD
Odeon are the right label to present this long awaited classic on DVD. Specialising in films sometimes thought of as lost classics, Odeon constantly bring out British movies from the 40's, 50's and 60's that are a sheer delight and this is just one. A very good print of a classic that is in a class of it's own. Long live Odeon entertainment!
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