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Seven Days to Tell You by [Soames, Ruby]
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Seven Days to Tell You Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

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Length: 226 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product Description

Review

"An irresistible read - fast paced and finely crafted. The author makes an intriguing study of the impact of grief and the minutiae of love." 4/4 Star Rating
--FRANCE Magazine, July, 2011

"Ruby Soames offers McEwanish sophistication of style and structure." --The Riviera Reporter, August, 2011

"If you're looking for a sombre, unpredictable and compelling read with fresh metaphors and a rich aray of imagery, Seven Days to Tell You is just for you."
--The ChickLit Club, September, 2011

From the Publisher

Book groups all over the UK chose Seven Days to Tell for publication in 2010.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 682 KB
  • Print Length: 226 pages
  • Publisher: Hookline Books (11 Jun. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0078XG6LO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #216,248 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
`Seven Days to Tell You' could be renamed Seven Days to Figure It Out except that it is sure to take less than seven days to read because once you start, this book has a way of hooking you in and stirring your curiosity in an unputdownable kind of way. It shifts and changes in time and point of view, keeping you wondering and guessing through its many twists and turns.

Ruby Soames first novel succeeded the vote of bookclub readers whose opinion influences which novels are chosen for publication by Hookline Books and I can see why this riveting, page turning novel was enjoyed by so many and undoubtedly hotly discussed.

Kate is a paediatric doctor not given to wild, spontaneous acts, so surprises some and generates envy in others when she marries the wild, charming and mysterious Marc, a Frenchman she meets during a brief encounter at the end of an otherwise disappointing holiday. She appears to have proven the doubters wrong, until one day three years into their marriage, Marc disappears without trace.

After three fruitless years searching for him, Kate is beginning to rebuild her life when she wakes one morning to find the familiar form of her errant husband in bed beside her. He asks for seven days to prove his love, seven days to spend together before she makes her inevitable decision.

Soames doesn't give anything away and is adept in her use of the unusual second person viewpoint in much of the narrative, which makes reading her story a little like reading a private letter or prying into someone's journal; it's not written to you the reader, it addresses Marc and like eavesdropping on a conversation, you find yourself trying to fill in the gaps to figure out what's not being said.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's not often that a book can make me cry, but this one did, more than once! It's an original story, full of twists, and the author really succeeds in getting across what it's like to love somebody unconditionally, and the dangerous places that love can lead. Highly recommended!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read this book in 24 hours - my housework remained undone, my family had to fend for themselves for their supper and I finally went to bed at 2.30 am but I was hooked from the first page. This is a debut novel but the writing is good, the pace is perfect and I loved the use of the second person style - not one often used, but very appropriate for this story.
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Format: Paperback
This was a really intriguing idea for a story - a husband who disappears and then walks back in after 3 years as if nothing had happened. The book is written as if in a letter from Kate to Marc and I really felt that Kate poured her heart out in it. As it flicks back and forth between past and present we learn more about Kate and Marc, but the more I learned the more I disliked them.

I think a pivotal point in Kate's life was when she broke up with Dave in France, which is where she went on to meet Marc as she was making her way home alone. I thought the stars had aligned and they were meant to meet, and perhaps they were, but as we learn how Marc came to be in the same place as Kate I wondered if perhaps he just latched on to the first woman he saw in order to escape his responsibilities.

As every facet of their relationship is disclosed, I found it really interesting that my feelings moved from dislike of the pair to hope that they had the strength to make their marriage work. Kate and Marc are such individually flawed characters that perhaps their only hope of happiness is with each other as their secrets are revealed.

It's an interesting read analysing the flaws of a relationship and how maybe, in the words of John Lennon, love is all you need.

I received this book from the publisher, Hookline, in exchange for an honest review.
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Format: Paperback
This is a book you won't put down if you have an ounce of passion left coursing through your veins.

It begins with one of the most sensual, lingering, literary pan shots as an intruder enters the narrator's bedroom and we wonder what his intentions are ...
But the man is her lost husband, a Martin Guerre of contemporary fiction, not a peasant soldier but a charismatic French lover, who when he returns after 3 year's unexplained absence, is once more an experience to be treasured, a rock to lean on, a soul mate in the urban 21st c desert of London, W11.
And yet he is also the man who has callously abandoned and almost detroyed her, without a word.

The rare depth and sensitivity of this man's love is clearly worth hanging on to, but at what cost, and where do the boundaries of tolerance and humiliation lie, what is the difference between extravagant eccentricity, and a condescending brand of cruelty and control?

Post-feminism reigns, behaviour is not branded as gender-based, men and women have been liberated, so each act, however outrageous, has to be accepted as individual expression, not a sexist act . This is about loss and bereavement without a corpse, and the giving and the withdrawal of love, with a marked difference in the writing when crossing the thresholds of love and lust.

The narrator's decision remains a mystery until the very end...
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