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Seven Days in New Crete Paperback – 1 Jun 1975

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Product details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Quartet Books; New edition edition (Jun. 1975)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0704311976
  • ISBN-13: 978-0704311978
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 10.7 x 1.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,699,436 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

No one else offers his precise combination of eroticism, nightmare and epigram (Guardian) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Robert Graves was born in 1895 in Wimbledon. He went from school to the First World War, where he became a captain in the Royal Welch Fusiliers and was seriously wounded at the Battle of the Somme. He wrote his autobiography, Goodbye to All That, in 1929, and it was soon established as a modern classic. He died on 7 December 1985 in Majorca, his home since 1929. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


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Format: Paperback
This book has made a deep and lasting impresion on me since reading it when I was 14. The book follows a poet from the 1930s who is whisked away into the distant future by a post industrial cabal of witches who wish to feel what it was like to have lived in the chaotic and hellish Twentieth Century. Edward Venn Thomas is being used by the Goddess to bring this tranquil, pastoral society to its senses. Graves' central message seems to be that humanity can never stay still, without danger of societal ossification and individual extinction. VennThomas oversees the beginning of the end for the New Cretan society, but we are given a fascinating glimpse into the way the industrial world collapsed and how the human spirit rose above the madness of pure logic which life in the last years of the 20th Century required. It is intriguing to realise that Graves actually believed in a real Goddess, who was behind his own poetic inspirations. Read it, you'll find the imagary and atmosphere which Graves evokes extremely powerful; some of it may stay with you for years. This is a book for the spiritually numb, who find the late Twentieth Century somewhat absurd .....you'll love it as I do!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8acb7408) out of 5 stars 1 review
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8acb85c4) out of 5 stars Ian Myles Slater on Robert Graves' Utopia 12 Sept. 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
"Seven Days in New Crete" is the original title (I think) of a book also published as "Watch the North Wind Rise." It first appeared in 1949. The original US edition was by Farrar Straus and Giroux, and there were US paperback printings by Avon Books in the 1960s, under the alternate title. I have not actually seen any later editions. In any version, it is a sort-of-science-fiction sort-of-novel by the poet, historical novelist, and would-be interpreter of anthropology and mythology, Robert Graves. It presents a tour of a future utopian society in which Graves' views of the ideal sexual (and other social) arrangements are displayed. There are resemblances, perhaps not entirely coincidental, to some of the experiments of the 1960s.
The society is based largely on Graves' own reconstruction of prehistoric Greece and the Aegean, as suggested in the novel "Hercules My Shipmate" (also, I believe, published as "The Golden Fleece"), and set out more fully in "The White Goddess" and the introduction and notes in "The Greek Myths." The latter two books are formally non-fiction, but "The White Goddess" is, in my opinion, probably the best fantasy novel ever written which does not have a developed narrative or an obvious plot. (Not a view Graves would have appreciated.)
"Seven Days in New Crete" does have a narrative, however. It was much admired by Fritz Leiber, a science fiction and fantasy writer of distinction, and a fine critic, who explored alternative societies in some of his own writings. (Mainly dystopian; as L. Sprague de Camp warned science fiction writers, utopias are insipid by virtue of their perfection). "Seven Days" is sure to intrigue anyone who has enjoyed Graves' books about antiquity, but it would be a poor introduction to his work. Those interested in utopian fiction in general will probably also find it of considerable interest.
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