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Settling Accounts: In at the Death (Great War) Paperback – 24 Jan 2008

3.7 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks (24 Jan. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340921803
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340921807
  • Product Dimensions: 11.2 x 3.9 x 17.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 795,911 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

With shocking vividness, Turtledove demonstrates the extreme fragility of our modern world ... This is state-of-the-art alternate history, nothing less (Publishers Weekly on HOW FEW REMAIN)

Turtledove plays heady games with actual history, scattering object lessons and bitter ironies along the way. Strong, complex characters against a sweeping alt-historical background. (Kirkus Reviews on SETTLING ACCOUNTS: RETURN ENGAGEMENT)

Turtledove's books are always great entertainment but in all these novels about an alternate North America the possible route of democracy, demagoguery and repression ring all too true . . . the power of the book is in its ordinary people and their struggles. (SFX Magazine on SETTLING ACCOUNTS: RETURN ENGAGEMENT)

Engrossing . . . definitely the work of one of alternate history's authentic modern masters ... totally fascinating. (Booklist on THE GREAT WAR series)

Book Description

In the fourth volume of the Settling Accounts sequence it is 1945, and the war between the northern and southern American states that began in 1861 ends at last, as the most inventive and enthralling alternate-history series of our time comes to its surprising conclusion.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
this is as far as I know the last in the great war series of books and it draws together all the strands and characters we have met in previous books and there have been a few, it has been a compulsive read from the start following the advances in warfare over time from cavalry and single shot rifles and machine guns through to primitive fighters and bombers and the first armoured cars and first tanks (barrels) then on to submarines and destroyers and battleships and aircraft carriers and eventually the atomic bomb and many other various nefarious ways humans can find of killing each other , also in the mix are death camps and mass killings all wound around the alternative history mr turtledove weaves around the reader all in all and fantastic series
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Format: Hardcover
Harry Turtledove's alternate history series has a lot in common with a summer cinematic blockbuster. They come out like clockwork, offer a good deal of action, but not too much below the surface. The last volume, Settling Accounts: The Grapple, was a particularly disappointing entry, as Turtledove seemed to have lost any interest in what was becoming a monotonous series. This, the concluding volume of his 'Settling Accounts' quartet, however, is a much more enjoyable addition. Rather than stretching things out further, he wraps up his alternate Second World War between the United States and the Confederacy with a bang -- in fact, with several of them.

At the end of the last volume, the Confederacy was sliding towards what seemed an inevitable defeat, with U.S. forces striking towards Atlanta, General Sherman-style. While Turtledove picks up where he leaves off, he throws in enough twists to keep the story interesting. And though the war ends well before the last page, there is more than enough in the later chapters to satisfy readers who have followed the series from its initial volume, 'How Few Remain', as the postwar fates of many lasting characters are sketched out for the reader. As a result, while this volume may lack some of the imagination of his 'Crosstime Traffic' series, longtime fans of the series will find little to disappoint them here.
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By Paul Tapner TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 11 Mar. 2008
Format: Paperback
this is the latest and possibly last in a long series of alternate history novels that have shown us an america where the south won the civil war, and history has taken a different turn as a result.

This started with a book called how few remain that detailed a second civil war in the 1880's.

the following trilogy the great war showed us world war one in america with the north versus the south again.

the next trilogy american empire showed us this world from the 20's to the 30's with the south falling under control of a fascist leader.

and this book is the fourth volume in the series return engagement, which details a new war between the two in the 1940's.

It actually is very easy to read and you might be able to pick it up without having read the former volumes, but I would recommend going right back to the start of the series as you'll get more out of that way.

harry turtledove as usual writes prose which is not great literature but is very readable, and uses a fair few characters as his viewpoints, scenes shifting between each on regular occasions.

the war actually ends two hundred pages before the end of this six hundred and eight page book, and what the last two hundred pages cover is the aftermath. the war may have finished but all the hatreds haven't gone away. and like real wars, it doesn't end with a last minute attack on the villains base and everyone living happily ever after, it ends with peace treaties and people wondering what the future will hold. the writer doesnt shy away from depicting all the hatreds and it does make you think about the resulting moral issues, which is good writing.

I've followed these characters through a lot of books now, and if this is the end of the story I will be sorry to see them go. A good read.
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Format: Paperback
over at last, though with turtledove he may decide to milk the series further, having initially been a big fan of his i have to say i can't see myself buying another of his books due mainly to the repetitive storeyline, i found myself skipping entire sections of the book, and groaned out loud. It's all be said before in earlier books in the series..
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Format: Paperback
Turtledove, that is. As other reviewers have noted, he's just going through the motions these days. I think control-c and control-v have been used a lot in writing this book. In essence, tedious.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The final (thank goodness) book in Turtledove's unimaginative 11-volume epic about what might have happened had the South won the American Civil War.

I thought at least there would have been some intrigue around the diplomatic machinations in this one but it was left open-ended with no solution on the horizon. Surely we're not going to get yet more books added to this ultimately very boring series.

Anyway, my work is done and I have read them all. It seemed like a good idea at the time but looking back over the whole series I can honestly recommend that you give it a miss. It simply moves the events of the European theatre to North America. The characters are really quite wooden and there are way too many recaps. I found myself frequently skipping over whole parapraphs that were only there to rehash previous plot points. As this frequently involves ridiculous dialogue, it only adds to the lifelessness of the characters.

Very poor indeed.
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