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Separate Tables [DVD] [1958] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

4.5 out of 5 stars 67 customer reviews

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Dispatched from and sold by M and N Media US.
£46.28 Only 1 left in stock - order soon. Dispatched from and sold by M and N Media US.

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  • Separate Tables [DVD] [1958] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
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Product details

  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: French, Spanish
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005PJ6X
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 281,480 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)
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Product description

Terrific film adapted from a brilliant play.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Was reading Niven's Autobiography and discovered his 1958 Oscar win for this film. I have not seen the movie before and i really enjoyed all the performances. The DVD only took 2 days to arrive and was very good value. Audio and picture were perfect; as described in the sellers info.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A great film. I was surprised at the subject matter covered considering the year it was made.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Nice quality dvd. Great film!
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Very very good, been looking for this video for quite a while
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By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 31 July 2004
Format: VHS Tape
Produced in 1958 by Harold Hecht and directed by Delbert Mann, Separate Tables takes place at the tiny Beauregard Hotel, a seaside resort on England's south coast, which serves in the winter as "a refuge for the lonely, resigned, and desperate." The main feature of the hotel is its separate tables, rather than "family style" dining, for the guests. The cast is a who's who of fifties stars--David Niven (who won an Oscar for his role), Deborah Kerr, Bert Lancaster, Rita Hayworth, and Wendy Hiller (who also won an Oscar)--all playing characters who live as separated from the world as their tables are in the dining room.
The Major (Niven) sets the action in motion when he is reported in the local newspaper as having been guilty of "insulting behavior" in a movie theater, and his war record is published. Niven is worshipped from afar by Sybil Railton-Bell (Kerr), a pathetically neurotic woman, subject to hysteria, who is totally controlled by her demanding mother. John Malcolm (Lancaster), was once married to former model Ann Shankland (Hayworth), who has suddenly come to visit him at the hotel, possibly to rekindle their flame, but he is already secretly engaged to Pat Cooper (Hiller), the manager of the hotel. A variety of eccentric subordinate characters add color, and occasionally humor, to the action. These isolated characters soon begin to find their lives intersecting and overlapping, and they eventually coming to a poignant reckoning in the hotel dining room, as everyone arrives at his/her separate table.
The cinematography (Charles Lang) and music (David Raksin), both nominated for Academy Awards, provide subtle emphasis for the character dramas going on in the hotel, rather than calling attention to themselves.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Wrong region---I couldn't open it and it would have cost $13.00 to send back so had to dump it.
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Format: DVD
The film of "Separate Tables" was cobbled together from the two one-act plays that Rattigan published collectively under this title, and which were stage-premiered in 1954. Not having seen the stage play I can't comment on the film's resemblance to it, but I suspect that MGM smuggled several extraneous stories into the film in order to provide star vehicles for several of its actors, and thereby boost its box-office appeal.
The film, like the play, is set in the Beauregard Hotel, in 1950's Bournemeouth. It is less of a hotel in the modern sense of the word and more of a "pension" in which (mostly) elderly people patiently sit out their retirement. The hotel is run by Pat Cooper (Wendy Hiller), who has high hopes of marrying one of the tenants, the wayward American writer John Malcolm (Burt Lancaster), though the sudden appearance of his ex-wife Ann (Rita Hayworth) puts the kibosh on that. Other tenants include the domineering Mrs Railton-Bell (Gladys Cooper) and her neurotic, sexually repressed daughter Sibyl (Deborah Kerr). Sibyl has an unspoken but very evident passion for another of the tenants, the retired army officer Major Angus Pollock (David Niven). Pollock cuts a fine figure, regaling everyone with his raffish stories of Wellington and Sandhurst, and of his distinguished career with the Desert Rats in North Africa.
The stultifying bourgeoise propriety of the establishment is shattered when the mendacious Mrs Railton-Bell discovers that the dashing "Major" Pollock is in fact an impostor who has been found guilty of molesting strange women in cinemas, and whose heroic background is entirely fictitious. Sibyl is shattered when the story comes out and Pollock prepares to leave the Hotel in disgrace.

There are massive problems with the film.
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By FAMOUS NAME VINE VOICE on 23 Sept. 2008
Format: DVD
This is a movie centred around a marvellous story.

David Niven plays a 'fake' Major. This is because he hides a secret past which is about to become public knowledge at a small Hotel where he has been staying some time. He is 'sweet' on a 'spinster-ish' woman (Deborah Kerr) who's dominated by her possessive mother (Gladys Cooper) There are other stories within this picture, but the story between 'The Major' and 'Sybil' is by far the most touching and absorbing. There are some wonderful scenes in this, and David Niven gives an outstanding performance and gets much sympathy from the Viewer.

This film not only shows how cruel and judgmental people can be, but how the best can be brought out after their shame - and in contrast, just how kind they can be.

A gem of a movie.

Also stars Felix Aylmer, Cathleen Nesbitt, Rod Talyor, Rita Hayworth and Burt Lancaster.
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