• RRP: £12.50
  • You Save: £2.51 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders dispatched by Amazon with at least £10 of books.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Sense and Sensibility and... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Tree Savers
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A used book that is in good, clean condition. Your item will be picked, packed and posted FREE to you within the UK by Amazon, also eligible for super saver delivery
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters Paperback – 15 Sep 2009

3.1 out of 5 stars 49 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.99
£0.92 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£9.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders dispatched by Amazon with at least £10 of books. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters
  • +
  • Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics)
  • +
  • Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics): Pride and Prejudice and Zombies
Total price: £30.22
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Quirk Books; Original edition (15 Sept. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594744424
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594744426
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.4 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 292,805 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

The reinterpretation of Jane Austen's novel (Pride and Prejudice and Zombies) will be followed with the release of Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters... The books were created by US-based publishing house, Quirk Books. Jason Rekulak, the editorial director, said he pioneered the format after meeting dozens of Austen fans at a Californian sci-fi convention. He told the Independent that he was a "lifelong fan" of the works of Jules Verne, and thought it would be fun to enliven the follow-up with some rampaging giant squid and man-eating octopuses...'
--The Telegraph, 13 August 2009

The crossover between fans of Jane Austen and lovers of B-movie horror is small, but it is enough to warrant a follow-up to Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. An instant classic that saw the Bennet sisters meet the undead, it sold more than half a million copies in English and was then translated into 17 languages. This follow-up literary 'mash-up' has the Dashwood girls looking for love in a watery England at the mercy of vengeful sea creatures. Forget sprained ankles in Devonshire, Ben Winters has introduced a gigantic, man-eating jellyfish and packed the poor girls off to the Pestilent Isle under the care of retired adventurer Sir John Middleton, who sports a necklace of human ears, while Colonel Brandon's sideburns are a horrific abberation. Winters lets Austen set the tone and the plot swims surprisingly faitfully in her wake. It's a very silly conceit, mixing Regency manners with a Jules Verne topography, but it is as attention-grabbing as a two-headed creature rising from the deep, while diving suits are far more becoming than frocks.
--The Guardian, 3 October 2009

About the Author

Jane Austen is coauthor of the "New York Times "best seller "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, "which has been translated into 17 languages and optioned to become a major motion picture. She died in 1817. Ben H. Winters is a writer based in Brooklyn.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Roman Clodia TOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 Nov. 2009
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Some of the negative reviews here seem to be because of the varying expectations of the reviewers: so I guess it's worth saying that this isn't an `introduction' to Jane Austen - this book relies completely on a fairly close acquaintance with the original. In fact it is Austen's original text, intersected and broadened by the interpenetration of the `horror'/SF/imperial adventure genre epitomised by authors like Rider Haggard, Conan Doyle (The Lost World rather than Sherlock Holmes), Jules Verne and later `B' movie spin-offs. And it's precisely the fact that this is written in Austen's measured, balanced formal prose that makes it so funny.

The text investigates the borders of genre in an insistently post-modern way, and finds them to be far more permeable than we might expect. It's not just the Austen romance, we find, that can be hijacked by early horror/SF, but that romance can completely hold its own: the shape of the genre may be bent and distorted but never eradicated completely. By mixing such seemingly-separate genres, this actually serves to draw attention to both their similarity and dissimilarity: refusing to play by genre rules serves not to make genre irrelevant but to actually re-impose its rules.

The eco-message gives this a contemporary edge that taps into C21st anxieties, but at the same time encodes the fragility beneath the ostensible confidence of Austen's own society which had witnessed the French revolution, the American revolution and was in the middle of the Napoleonic wars which take place unnamed in the background to her romances.

So overall I loved this and while it can certainly be read as light and frothy fun, it's actually quite literarily knowing and sophisticated, and requires us to simultaneously recall the original and forget it at the same time.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Charles Green TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I picked up Sense & Sensibility & Sea Monsters (S&S&S) mostly out of curiosity. I had read Quirk Book's first 'Austen Mash Up', Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics), and found it to be, as my review said, a 'A Disjointed, One Joke Effort' that just about scraped two stars. I was interested therefore, to see if trying the same trick with a slightly less well known Austen novel, a different sci-fi genre and a new co-author would result in a more successful outcome.

It turns out that it does, but only just. S&S&S is certainly a better written book than P&P&Z was. The original Austen text and Ben Winter's aquatic mayhem are far better integrated this time around. Whereas P&P&Z felt like Austen's novel with chunks of zombie related action sort of 'tacked on' here and there, the old and new parts of S&S&S are more closely and cleverly intertwined and Winter is far better at aping Austen's style of writing so that the additions are less jarring. S&S&S is also funnier than P&P&Z, although its by no means a work of comedic genius. The latter took essentially what was a single joke and stretched it to breaking point, whereas S&S&S riffs on a variety of genres such as monster movies, pirate adventures and steam punk. It also makes more successful use of the humour that stems naturally from the odd juxtaposition of Austen's writing with attacks from giant fish monsters. Whilst never subtle S&S&S is a far more cleverly written book than P&P&Z.

What it isn't however, is a very satisfying book.
Read more ›
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This runs out of steam real quick. The basic idea is enough for a short story or comedy sketch, but in full novel form, the single joke becomes stretched way too thinly. It doesn't work and the incursions of sea monsters into polite regency society become tedious and irrelevant. It is not actually done with any craft or humour and the fishy bits are just crunched into the narritave resulting in an uneven read with crude and visible joints showing.

I was fully prepared to like this as I do like Jane Austin as well as HPL and Verne. Bad research and bad jokes abound. I don't know what a "Craw fish fry" is, but I'm sure they didn't have them in Devon 200 years ago. Bad illustrations too.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It has long been my fervent belief that there can't be many great works of literature which would not be significantly enhanced by the addition of giant octupi, marauding armies of swordfish forming themselves into attack forces and man-eating molluscs and this book has just completely confirmed my opinion in this.

I loved this book - what's not to love? The classic tale of the Dashwood sisters and their adventures and misadventures through polite society and in love melded perfectly together with a fishy accompaniment. Winters never misses a beat in his oceanic additions and I was laughing pretty much all the way through the book. There are some really clever twists here - transforming the fashionable heart of society into Sub-Station Beta was inspired, and the addition of the Fanged Sea Beast of Devon into the scene where Lucy Steele makes her devastating relevation to Elinor concerning Edward Ferrars adds a further dimension to the drama and action.

I couldn't quite get why there were so many negative reviews of this book, but I do suspect that it is appealing to a very particular type of reader. You have to love Jane Austen to appreciate it(as well as sea monsters). Indeed, the author gives it away in his dedication at the beginning of the book. This book is aimed at people who love both "great literature and great silliness". If you don't like both, I suspect this isn't going to tick many boxes for you.

I'm not a big fan of authors including "reading notes" or "guidance for reading group discussion" at the end of their works - readers don't need to be told what to think, but I'm prepared to make an exception in this case.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback