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Sense and Sensibility by [Austen, Jane]
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Sense and Sensibility Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 312 customer reviews
Customers reported quality issues in this eBook. This eBook has: Typos.
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Kindle Edition, 1 Jan 2010

Length: 230 pages Word Wise: Enabled Audible Narration:
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Amazon Review

Though not the first novel she wrote, Sense and Sensibility was the first Jane Austen published. Though she initially called it Elinor and Marianne, Austen jettisoned both the title and the epistolary mode in which it was originally written, but kept the essential theme: the necessity of finding a workable middle ground between passion and reason. The story revolves around the Dashwood sisters, Elinor and Marianne. Whereas the former is a sensible, rational creature, her younger sister is wildly romantic--a characteristic that offers Austen plenty of scope for both satire and compassion. Commenting on Edward Ferrars, a potential suitor for Elinor's hand, Marianne admits that while she "loves him tenderly", she finds him disappointing as a possible lover for her sister:
Oh! Mama, how spiritless, how tame was Edward's manner in reading to us last night! I felt for my sister most severely. Yet she bore it with so much composure, she seemed scarcely to notice it. I could hardly keep my seat. To hear those beautiful lines which have frequently almost driven me wild, pronounced with such impenetrable calmness, such dreadful indifference!
Soon, however, Marianne meets a man who measures up to her ideal: Mr Willoughby, a new neighbour. So swept away by passion is Marianne that her behaviour begins to border on the scandalous. Then Willoughby abandons her; meanwhile, Elinor's growing affection for Edward suffers a check when he admits he is secretly engaged to a childhood sweetheart. misfortunes and the lessons they draw before coming finally to the requisite happy ending forms the heart of the novel. Though Marianne's disregard for social conventions and willingness to consider the world well-lost for love may appeal to modern readers, it is Elinor whom Austen herself most evidently admired; a truly happy marriage, she shows us, exists only where sense and sensibility meet and mix in proper measure. --Alix Wilber, Amazon.com


" As nearly flawless as any fiction could be."
-- Eudora Welty

"As nearly flawless as any fiction could be."
--Eudora Welty

"As nearly flawless as any fiction could be." --Eudora Welty

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3726 KB
  • Print Length: 230 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1494394642
  • Publisher: Bethany House Publishers; Insight ed. edition (1 Jan. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00B85CP0O
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 312 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #282,112 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
While the various cinema and television dramatisations of her books have deservedly contributed to making Jane Austen known and loved beyond the study of her writing in the classroom, it would be a shame to settle for the adaptations and never read those exquisitely written novels.
I have just reread "Sense and Sensibility" and have once again marvelled at the absolute masterliness of Jane Austen's depiction of human feelings, hesitations and dilemmas. Young ladies in 2005 may not make their emotional choices in the same way as Elinor and Marianne Dashwood had to do two hundred years ago, but few contemporary writers show the complexity of emotional relationships with the same precision and insight as Jane Austen. Then as now, the most irresistible men on the surface turn out, like Willougby, to be the most unsuitable ones when you get to know them (and that doesn't make them any less irresistible...); then as now, parents (Mrs Frears) tend to be domineering and unbearable, and yet a part of the equation to be reckoned with; then as now, it may be a good idea to realise that people are very often less predictable than they at first seemed...
But then - and very often not now... - there was the way Jane Austen plotted it all out and honed her sentences like chisels, so that the novel begs to be read aloud.
As of course it would have been once. For those who never have, time to switch off the TV and launch into Jane Austen. Start with this one; take sides with Marianne and with Elinor, marvel at how comic characters like jovial Mrs Jennings and bimbo-ish, semi-literate Lucy Steele remind you of people still very much at large today. Then treat yourself to the even more wonderful "Pride and Prejudice". And then all the others. And bemoan the fact there are only six of them (plus a couple of bits...) And then start all over again.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a short review of the product not the book.

It is superbly read by Ms Stevenson (as in her reading of "Persuasion") - once more every word and inflection counts. The characters - well or less ably drawn - live. Miss Austen's often stringent wit comes through repeatedly, as does her understanding of her gender. I can't think of a better way to make a series of long car journeys a delightful prospect!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Jane Austen is such an excellent observer and recorder of life it is hardly possible not to enjoy her work. In sense and sensibility every character is to be found. The heroes and heroines, Elinor, Colonel Brandon and Edward. The villains, Willoughby, Fanny Dashwood and Lucy Steele. The kind-hearted but at times not very discerning Sir John and Mrs Jennings. And of course the gloriously pompous are to be found in Fanny Dashwood’s husband John and her brother Robert. And if you need any more theatre you can always rely on Charlotte Palmer and at times even Mrs Dashwood. As you read you can’t help but smile at the characters knowing that in the end it will all work out, but what a fabulous journey! I particularly enjoyed the contrast in temperament between Elinor and Marianne,
“We have neither of us anything to tell; you, because you do not communicate, and I, because I conceal nothing."
“Esteem him! Like him! Cold-hearted Elinor! Oh! Worse than cold-hearted! Ashamed of being otherwise. Use those words again, and I will leave the room this moment.”
I find it a pleasing paradox in the sisters that one is all sense and the other all drama, yet both are flawed in their communication, one too much and one too little. Beautifully constructed.
The 1995 screen adaption by Ang Lee is probably the best dramatization, although there are other versions that stick closer to the original text. But of course it’s the original work by Austen that gives so much more than a film.
Sense and sensibility ranks high with the other greats of English literature, although my personal preference would put it just below Pride and prejudice.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is a review of this particular edition of Sense and Sensibility for Kindle, since reviews of the book are easy enough to find.

I was looking for an unabridged version of Sense and Sensibility, that had even margins on each side of the text and that was nicely formatted. This edition delivered everything I wanted, including nice simple formatting that is easy to follow (it almost has a vintage feel to it) and chapters that start on a new page, with the added bonus of wonderful illustrations throughout the book (one of two per chapter -- enough to enjoy, but not so many it's distracting). I loved reading this edition and would highly recommend it.

My only complaint is that I can't buy Persuiasion in the same edition.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I came to the novel as most people do, via her better known books - Pride and Prejudice and Emma. Sense and Sensibility, while a pleasant read, didn't hold my interest in the way Austen's classic novels have. The heroines are less assertive and less modern which made the book less appealing to me - I prefer my heroines to have some spice. The ideal heroine in Victorian times was, I guess, daintier and sweeter and a whole lot more naive than modern heroines. And the heroes were chivalrous to the point of being plain dumb.
Having said that, Austen's wit shines through and the interactions of some of the nastier characters brought a smile to my face. It seems that people could be just as horrible then as they are today.
Sense and Sensibility is an OK read, but if you haven't read Austen before then start with something else.
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