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Senna Versus Prost by [Folley, Malcolm]
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Senna Versus Prost Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

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Length: 416 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

"Great rivalries are among the glories of sport, and Malcolm Folley's book Senna Versus Prost ... examines one of the most fascinating" (Guardian)

"The writing is excellent, which is no surprise coming from this seasoned journalist. The narrative is intelligent ... A familiar story is still worth telling if done well. In this case, it's mission accomplished" (Motor Sport)

"Thanks to Folley, we have Alain Prost's account of a time when F1 ran red from the pit stop to the podium to enlighten us on one of racing's greatest rivalries" (GQ)

"... for a superb insight into antagonism between F1 team-mates, read Malcolm Folley's brilliant new book Senna Versus Prost, which charts the rivalry between two of the sport's greatest-ever drivers" (Daily Mirror)

"With the inside track of having covered the sport for a number of years, Folley writes with authority as he weaves a picture of the sporting greats lives and rivalry" (Press Association)

Review

'The writing is excellent, which is no surprise coming from this seasoned journalist. The narrative is intelligent ... A familiar story is still worth telling if done well. In this case, it's mission accomplished.'

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1603 KB
  • Print Length: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Cornerstone Digital (7 May 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0031RSAVU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #306,836 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As someone who has been a Formula One fan for many years and has read many books on Senna and Prost, I was dissapointed with this book. It is basically an account of both Senna and Prost's careers and this has been covered in countless other books in greater detail. I found myself skipping over the race accounts and old interviews which I have read previously, in order to find the 'new' material. The 'new' material is a recent, and fairly underwhelming, interview with Prost which does not add any great insight into the relationship he had with Senna. This may be an interesting read for someone new to the topic but for those who have read other books on Senna and Prost this adds nothing new.
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Format: Hardcover
The impression it leaves me is that Folley was so delighted and gratified to be given a nice lunch and a fairly in depth interview by Prost in his Paris apartment in 2008 that his efforts to remain impartial thereafter collapsed into a morass of subtle and not so subtle slips that reaffirmed the narrative of Prost as the ultimate gentleman and Senna as the fragile and ruthless newbie who came and stole it all away. As such, the Folley narrative ranges from fair and balanced, to being rantingly anti-Senna. To the extent that Senna's story is told, or his point of view heard in retrospect, it is through the words of the others of the time: Warwick, Brundle, Berger, Walker, Jardine, Leberer et al, who Folley has at least taken the trouble to interview and quote. (Brundle is impressively self-effacing and candid about his standing against Senna...no agenda there. Warwick is also remarkably gracious, as he has been over the years about Senna, who he retains an immense respect for). Meanwhile, Folley's faithful repetition, without the slightest irony, of Prost's claim about Suzuka in '89: "I had no interest to make a crash", is a case in point. This is as disingenuous a statement as we have heard from Alain, up there with his equally laughable claim that he never blocked Senna from the Williams team for 1993 (we all know he did, and Senna called his bluff with his 'I'll drive for free' offer to Williams, to make the point). But the narrative treats it without the slightest scepticism, having described the Suzuka collision simply as "a brash manoeuvre" on Senna's part, which "hopelessly misjudged Prost's mood".Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
THis is a good book about Senna and Prost. Some of the information is not new, but a lot of them are. Also, the writer is a seasoned pro journalist covering Formula One. He interviwed personally and recently (2008) a lot of the main people for this book: Prost himself, Berger, Jo Ramirez, Tony Jardine, John Hogan, Warweick, Brundle, Murray Walker.

He is not partial to any of the sides. Also, a good thing is that he takes pause to explain about people other than Senna and Prost, like Ratzenberger.

The final feel I had after this book was (there follows my opinion): great champions like Schumacher, Senna and Prost were nowhere near the level of greatness, sporstmanship and cavalry that Clark, Stewart, Fangio or Hill had. Of course, at their time there wasn't so many money in the sport, maybe people could allow themselves to be more fair and easy. But Senna was ruthless to the core (like Schumacher after him). Prost was, by all acounts available, a more simple and easy fellow.

I remember thoses times (1988 and 1989) and I rember I did not enjoy all that bickering and unashamed dislike for one another. It was bad for the sport.

Curiously, this book has no photography at all! It's very rare indeed for this kind of book be published without photos. Anyway, a good read.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
While those familiar with this famous duel who have read many other books are unlikely to learn anything new this is an excellent book that goes over most of the goings on and does it without being too long!
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Format: Paperback
This book is an absolutely classic insight into the rivalry that existed between Alain Prost and Aryton Senna. Two completely different styles but both magnificent drivers. This book is a read page turner for F1 fans as I realised, when i finished the book in 5 days.The 80's was truly a great decade for Formula 1 despite the fatal crashes.Well done Foley...A Fantastic Read...
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Format: Paperback
The book does not live up to it's title: Senna vs. Prost only takes place after the half of the 400 pages. Only then the author has arrived at 1988. Everything until then describes the F1 seasons 1980 - 1987, resp. basks in British motorsport history. In school they would say "missed the point!". But it gets really bad when he misses interesting moments in the history of their rivalry, such as the temporary conciliation at the press conference after Monza 1990.

Someone could not expect a beatification of Senna here. But - in the tradition of many English Senna-Books - this is a masterpiece in Senna bashing. He really must have been a hate-figure in England. There are some exceptions, of course, for example the books of Christoper Hilton. But there are really bad things, e.g. "The death of Ayrton Senna" by Richard Williams or the mocking "The Messiah of Motor Racing" by Richard Craig.

When the author arrives at 1988, Prost was already introduced as a superior super-driver, who manages all critical situations easily, the book is also 80% Prost in a quantitative sense. Senna is presented as a spoilt brad with a rich family behind him, who blasts everyone ruthlessly off the track and who whines and cries, if thinigs not go well.

There's no objectivity in this book at all: A more or less up-to-date interview with Prost is mentioned all the time, while many of Sennas opinions, that are very well existing, were skipped or were given along the way, after Prosts version was almost introduced as a fact.

Someone is reminded to Sennas press conference after Suzuka 1988: I was treated like a criminal ... responsible for everything." The author digs out some interesting opinions: Responsible for Mansells accident in Suzuka 1991 was - Senna!
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