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A Semite: A Memoir of Algeria Hardcover – 2 May 2014

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press (2 May 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231164025
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231164023
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 15.2 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,902,526 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

...the 'fable, ' if we may call it that, is obviously magnificent, the investigation form at once rigorous and moving, the historico-political overhang of an impeccable accuracy. (...) This is 'our' entire history, with its mistakes, blind spots, hesitations, with its truth, with everything: the families and the loves, the profession, the seizing a bit unreal of occasions, the faithfulness and the coincidences, and the thing most just to have been written on 'France.'--Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe

The 'fable," if I can call it that, is unmistakably magnificent, the form--an inquiry--both rigorous and moving, the historical/political overview impeccably accurate. (...) This is "our" story, with its mistakes, its blind spots, its equivocations, its truth, with nothing omitted: families and the bonds of love, the teaching profession, an almost hallucinatory grasp of certain occasions, steadfastness, chance occurrences. Of all the things people have written about "France," this is the most just.--Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe

This is a complex engagement with the unique temporal, linguistic, and embodied qualities of family and cultural heritage. It is philosophically important and politically engaging, speaking to the necessities of repetition and distortion in the accuracies of memory and historical truth. It is also a delicate prose work of exceptional literary quality, an important contribution to contemporary studies in trauma and testimony and to the field of autobiography.--Penelope Deutscher, Northwestern University

This 'fable, ' if I can call it that, is unmistakably magnificent, the form--an inquiry--both rigorous and moving, the historical/political overview impeccably accurate. This is 'our' story, with its mistakes, its blind spots, its equivocations, its truth, with nothing omitted: families and the bonds of love, the teaching profession, an almost hallucinatory grasp of certain occasions, steadfastness, chance occurrences. Of all the things people have written about 'France, ' this is the most just.--Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, philosopher, author of "Heidegger and the Politics of Poetry"

[A] moving family biography.--Olivia Harrison"The Los Angeles Review of Books" (01/01/0001)

"A Semite" is an evocative work imparting to the reader that Jews and Arabs can and should, to induce the recent slogan, refuse to be enemies with each other. This wondrously written portrait of a cry is a resource of hope in our own envisaging of beautiful tomorrows.--Marcus Barnett"Marx and Philosophy Review of Books" (01/01/0001)

Gu?noun has written a riveting account of his larger-than life father that brings into sharp focus the last chapters of Jewish life in French Algeria in the 1960s.... A remarkable memoir.--Susan Gilson Miller"The Journal of North African Studies" (01/01/0001)

This is a complex engagement with the unique temporal, linguistic, and embodied qualities of family and cultural heritage. It is philosophically important and politically engaging, speaking to the necessities of repetition and distortion in the accuracies of memory and historical truth. It is also a delicate prose work of exceptional literary quality, an important contribution to contemporary studies in trauma and testimony and to the field of autobiography.

--Penelope Deutscher, Northwestern University

This 'fable, ' if I can call it that, is unmistakably magnificent, the form--an inquiry--both rigorous and moving, the historical/political overview impeccably accurate. This is 'our' story, with its mistakes, its blind spots, its equivocations, its truth, with nothing omitted: families and the bonds of love, the teaching profession, an almost hallucinatory grasp of certain occasions, steadfastness, chance occurrences. Of all the things people have written about 'France, ' this is the most just.

--Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, philosopher, author of Heidegger and the Politics of Poetry

Gu?noun has written a riveting account of his larger-than life father that brings into sharp focus the last chapters of Jewish life in French Algeria in the 1960s.... A remarkable memoir.

--Susan Gilson Miller"The Journal of North African Studies" (01/01/0001)

[A] moving family biography.

--Olivia Harrison"The Los Angeles Review of Books" (01/01/0001)

A Semite is an evocative work imparting to the reader that Jews and Arabs can and should, to induce the recent slogan, refuse to be enemies with each other. This wondrously written portrait of a cry is a resource of hope in our own envisaging of beautiful tomorrows.

--Marcus Barnett"Marx and Philosophy Review of Books" (01/01/0001)

Guenoun has written a riveting account of his larger-than life father that brings into sharp focus the last chapters of Jewish life in French Algeria in the 1960s.... A remarkable memoir.

--Susan Gilson Miller"The Journal of North African Studies" (01/01/0001)

This is a complex engagement with the unique temporal, linguistic, and embodied qualities of family and cultural heritage. It is philosophically important and politically engaging, speaking to the necessities of repetition and distortion in the accuracies of memory and historical truth. It is also a delicate prose work of exceptional literary quality, an important contribution to contemporary studies in trauma and testimony and to the field of autobiography.--Penelope Deutscher, Northwestern University

This 'fable, ' if I can call it that, is unmistakably magnificent, the form--an inquiry--both rigorous and moving, the historical/political overview impeccably accurate. This is 'our' story, with its mistakes, its blind spots, its equivocations, its truth, with nothing omitted: families and the bonds of love, the teaching profession, an almost hallucinatory grasp of certain occasions, steadfastness, chance occurrences. Of all the things people have written about 'France, ' this is the most just.--Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, philosopher, author of Heidegger and the Politics of Poetry

[A] moving family biography.--Olivia Harrison "The Los Angeles Review of Books "

A Semite is an evocative work imparting to the reader that Jews and Arabs can and should, to induce the recent slogan, refuse to be enemies with each other. This wondrously written portrait of a cry is a resource of hope in our own envisaging of beautiful tomorrows.--Marcus Barnett "Marx and Philosophy Review of Books "

Guenoun has written a riveting account of his larger-than life father that brings into sharp focus the last chapters of Jewish life in French Algeria in the 1960s.... A remarkable memoir.--Susan Gilson Miller "The Journal of North African Studies "

About the Author

Denis Guenoun is professor emeritus of French literature at the Universite Paris-Sorbonne (Paris-IV). A playwright and essayist, he has published numerous books on theater and philosophy, including Actions et acteurs, Livraison et delivrance, and Hypotheses sur l'Europe, which has been published in English as About Europe: Philosophical Hypotheses.Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature and the codirector of the Program of Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley.Ann Smock is professor emeritus of French at the University of California, Berkeley. She has translated two books by Maurice Blanchot and a memoir by Sarah Kofman. Her own most recent work is What Is There to Say?William Smock, a documentary filmmaker, has translated scholarly articles and a chapter in The Foucault Reader. He is the author/illustrator of The Bauhaus Ideal Then and Now.

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a good read
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