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Selma to Saigon: The Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War (Civil Rights and the Struggle for Black Equality in the Twentieth Century) Hardcover – 28 Feb 2014


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""While many others have examined the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War, no one, to date, has presented as well-researched and well-written examination of the relationship between these two seminal developments as Lucks does in Selma to Saigon. Lucks convincingly argues that the war forced African Americans to 'choose sides' and that by the end of the 1960s the civil rights movement had become yet another casualty of the fight in Southeast Asia. His work should be of interest to a broad range of readers, from scholars of the civil rights movement to a more general audience of readers interested in the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, and the 1960s."--Peter B. Levy, author of Civil War on Race Street: The Civil Rights Movement in Cambridge, Maryland" --

""At last, a book that acknowledges the enormous impact of the Cold War on the relationship between the civil rights and peace movements. Reading Daniel Lucks's analysis of how the Vietnam War divided the civil rights movement, one cannot help but consider the profound and lasting consequences of those divisions and the lessons we might learn as we continue the struggle for justice and peace."--Robbie Lieberman, author of The Strangest Dream: Communism, Anticommunism and the U.S. Peace Movement 1945-1963" --

""In Selma to Saigon, Daniel S. Lucks places civil rights leaders' responses to the Vietnam War firmly within the Cold War context, and explores the tragic repercussions of America's disastrous military intervention in Southeast Asia for African Americans. His important book demonstrates the continuing draw of 'The Sixties' on the historical imagination, as well as that turbulent era's complex legacy."--Simon Hall, author of Peace and Freedom: The Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements in the 1960s" --

"In Selma to Saigon, Daniel S. Lucks places civil rights leaders' responses to the Vietnam War firmly within the Cold War context, and explores the tragic repercussions of America's disastrous military intervention in Southeast Asia for African Americans. His important book demonstrates the continuing draw of 'The Sixties' on the historical imagination, as well as that turbulent era's complex legacy." -- Simon Hall, author of Peace and Freedom: The Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements in the 1960s

"A pivotal and much-needed examination of the impact of the war in Vietnam on black America and the civil rights movement. Few wars produced as many ironies and paradoxes, as Lucks demonstrates compellingly and thoughtfully in his analysis and through the voices and actions of the participants, one of whom said, 'I had left one war and came back to fight another one.' That spirit resonated among many who survived and returned to a changed and all-too-familiar America." -- Leon F. Litwack, A. F. and May T. Morrison Professor of American History Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley

"The first full-length treatment of the relationship between the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War, this extremely well-researched and very readable book should become the standard in its area." -- James E. Westheider, author of "The African American Experience in Vietnam: Brothers In Arms"

"While many others have examined the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War, no one, to date, has presented as well-researched and well-written examination of the relationship between these two seminal developments as Lucks does in "Selma to Saigon." Lucks convincingly argues that the war forced African Americans to 'choose sides' and that by the end of the 1960s the civil rights movement had become yet another casualty of the fight in Southeast Asia. His work should be of interest to a broad range of readers, from scholars of the civil rights movement to a more general audience of readers interested in the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, and the 1960s." -- Peter B. Levy, author of " Civil War on Race Street: The Civil Rights Movement in Cambridge, Maryland"

"At last, a book that acknowledges the enormous impact of the Cold War on the relationship between the civil rights and peace movements. Reading Daniel Lucks's analysis of how the Vietnam War divided the civil rights movement, one cannot help but consider the profound and lasting consequences of those divisions and the lessons we might learn as we continue the struggle for justice and peace." -- Robbie Lieberman, author of "The Strangest Dream: Communism, Anticommunism and the U.S. Peace Movement 1945-1963"

"In "Selma to Saigon," Daniel S. Lucks places civil rights leaders' responses to the Vietnam War firmly within the Cold War context, and explores the tragic repercussions of America's disastrous military intervention in Southeast Asia for African Americans. His important book demonstrates the continuing draw of 'The Sixties' on the historical imagination, as well as that turbulent era's complex legacy." -- Simon Hall, author of "Peace and Freedom: The Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements in the 1960s"

"A superb portrait of a very diffuse movement. Excellent." -- "Choice"

"[Luck's] analysis of how the civil rights and antiwar movements intertwined and affected each other is breathtaking in its complexity." -- "Air Power History"

"Daniel S. Lucks [... ] makes an important contribution by deconstructing the civil rights movement and revealing the tensions and disagreements among movement leadership and African American citizens over how to respond to the Vietnam War." -- "American Historical Review"

"[Other books on this topic] do not achieve the depth that Lucks does. [...] Based on meticulous research of a wide array of sources, Lucks paints an intense picture of the Vietnam War's effects on the civil rights movement and Lyndon B. Johnson's civil rights activism." -- "H-Net Reviews"

"Daniel S. Lucks's comprehensive and compelling "Selma to Saigon "carefully examines how the U.S. war in Vietnam affected the course of the civil rights struggle.

[...] It is the volume's rigorous detail in the telling that makes this work so valuable. Lucks combines a rich store of notable quotations and figures, historiographical insights, prominent tales told elsewhere, and original archival contributions to create a dense chronology that provides illuminating context for the actions taken by movement actors.

[...] [F]or students of these critical social movements and for those seeking to understand the complex political and ideological currents that buoy and sink struggles for social change, "Selma to Saigon "is an outstanding and welcome resource." -- "Journal of American History"

About the Author

Daniel S. Lucks earned his PhD at the University of California, Berkeley, USA.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wrinkle in Time 13 Aug. 2014
By Keith Casto - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is an obviously well-written and meticulously researched historical work. However, while it methodically chronicles the sad deterioration of a great movement by a corrosively demoralizing and dishonest war, it also captures the heartbreaking emotions of the era and the rending of the various factions working so closely together in common cause. Since I was young man then, it managed to transplant me body, mind and soul back to that wrenching place in time. Thank you for that cathartic experience.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Important Historical Contribution 18 Jun. 2014
By Mark Mizianty - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have read biographies of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and President Johnson, autobiographies of Andrew Young and Malcolm X, and was completely enthralled by the documentary series Eyes on the Prize. The civil rights movement has always fascinated me. Dr. Lucks has made an important contribution to the historical record of the time with this book, focusing on the effect of the Vietnam war on the civil rights struggle. This is a well written, scholarly book, though easily readable. I definitely recommend it to history fans, and those interested in the tumultuous, dynamic decade of the 60s.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not your average book. 2 July 2014
By Patricia Grundke - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Great research, extremely thorough reporting and fascinating stories. Outstanding vicabulary. Gave me a different view of the Vietnam's effect on race relations in America.
5.0 out of 5 stars The Essence of the Turbulent 60's 23 May 2014
By Lee Meisel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
As a teenager in the mid-1960's, I was well aware of the headlines about the Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam War and Cold War, but at the time didn't have a deep understanding about the events of the day. Reading Selma to Saigon was a personal journey for me as I learned so much about the climate that shaped my childhood and early adulthood. Some of the background material in the first couple of chapters was technical and detailed, and was initially slow reading, but integral to supporting the hypothesis of the book. I would urge any reader to stay the course as the book does an excellent job of weaving the fabric and capturing the essence of the turbulent 60's. This book will appeal most to serious and educated readers with a genuine interest in historical movements of 1960's.
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent research... 16 Nov. 2014
By steverman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
'Selma To Saigon' is a scholarly look at Vietnam and its profound impact on a generation. I rank it up there with Palmer's 'Summons of the Trumpet' in explaining the complex issues of the U.S. Military involvement in Southeast Asia. Too many proud young African Americans fought in Vietnam with little knowledge of the reasons why. What have we learned? Why were we involved? Why did we have to ultimately rationalize our defeat and agonizing departure? Lucks did his homework and frames the conflict and its futility in persuading Hanoi to end the struggle. Great read for those who seek understanding and the hope of learning the from the mistakes of Vietnam. By Steven M. Ourada, South Haven, Mi.
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