Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £3.53
includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Selection by [Patterson, Scott]
Kindle App Ad

Selection Kindle Edition

3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition, 12 Jun 2014
"Please retry"
£3.53

Length: 337 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Similar books to Selection

Great Reads for 99p
Browse our selection of Kindle Books discounted to 99p each. Learn more
Get a £1 reward for movies or TV
Enjoy a £1.00 reward to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 reward per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3864 KB
  • Print Length: 337 pages
  • Publisher: Deadly Spine (12 Jun. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00L0GUDXM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,978,575 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Selection is set in a dystopian society where parents choose to genetically enhance their children, and centers around the story of Pembroke Falls, a natural born girl who wants to fit in with the 'Selects.'

I struggle with how to rate this story. On the good, there's an abundance of plot (sometimes, too much plot), and the story is fast-paced. Though it took me longer to read than a story of this genre should, I was interested enough to read to the end.

The bad, and what kept making me set this story down: I found Pembroke annoying through much of the first half of the book, with her incessant desires to fit in. She improved slightly as the book went on, but only just. Perhaps I'm too far removed from my high-school years, but I just couldn't relate to her at all.

In addition, all the Selects were more or less interchangeable. I struggled to keep track of which Select was attacking Pembroke at various times in the novel - and more damning, I just couldn't care. It didn't matter to the plot progression at all. Everyone wants Pembroke dead.

Certain plot points that should be important are just randomly trailed off. For example - whether Pembroke's father is alive or dead seems to be up in the air, but because Pembroke now has a boyfriend, she doesn't seem to care?

The ending of the book was pretty anti-climatic, and riddled with more plot elements (pregnancy, the capture of her sister, etc.) I guess that's the second book.

I've seen YA done better - I've also seen it done far worse. A solid 3-star read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
I received this book in exchange for an honest review.

M. Scott Patterson’s dystopian chronicle of the 22nd century begins deceptively with a world that has survived an apocalypse and moved on to create a society filled with technological miracles. Centered on Pembroke, a naturally born citizen in a society where genetic enhancement is the norm, Selection is part coming of age story, part technological thriller and part apocalyptic horror. The blending of genres should make it unwieldy, but instead keep it riveting as the plot unfolds and Pembroke is forced to develop the strength of will to survive when the technological miracles of her society morph into nightmares of horror and destruction.

Only in the interactions between Pembroke and her love interest, Belem, does the novelist struggle, the writing becoming limited and occasionally cliché. The emotions and interactions never ring as true as they do between Pembroke and her sisters and father. Otherwise, the author is endlessly creative both in terms of the computer and medical technology and what happens when both start to deteriorate into madness. Every time the reader thinks there is nothing worse coming, some worse appears. I look forward to the sequel, Inquisition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
This is a teen science fiction novel told from a first person point of view.
The lead character is a teenager called Pembroke. She’s somewhat unique in that she and her sisters have not been genetically manipulated by a virus that changes embryo’s in-utero making the emerging children seem perfect. But there is an issue with those who have been affected by the virus and sociopathy seems to be the least of the problems encountered.
Pembroke is cringe worthy teenage character. You wince when she acts her age. She’s young and frankly not my cup of tea but she redeems herself with her interactions with her sisters and how she begins to look outside herself.
This novel is definitely for young adults. It gets quite deep and is somewhat heavy going but with a believable unlabored premise. I personally struggle with first person POV with teenage characters since I spent half my time face palming if they run generally true to character. That said, the author has created an involving and intricate world in which to base this story.
A solid 3.5 – 4 stars.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars 7 reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars An engaging read. 2 July 2014
By Robert M. Wright - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
The central mysteries of Patterson's debut--who released the virus decimating Brazil and why do some appear unaffected--are devices that have been well used in science fiction before. But in setting these mysteries in a future Brazil complete with AI controlled buildings and northern hemisphere refugees, Patterson has created an engaging and creative canvass for what is really a cleverly-paced disaster novel.

Patterson has also created likeable characters, and a strong heroine who becomes a remarkable survivor, rather than a damsel in distress. The central sibling relationship between Pembroke and her sisters is well crafted, and the array of colorful villains and supporting characters is wonderfully reminiscent of an Alan Quartermain or Indian Jones adventure.

While the novel falls prey to the occasional YA stereotype (a somewhat rote romantic sub-plot complete with significant bouts of teen angst), the crisp pace and clever action sequences keep the pages turning nicely.

Science fiction is at its best when it resonates with topical social commentary, and Patterson uses his setting well to weigh into issues of class and race. But it is really the well-paced adventure and strong central mystery that make Selection such an engaging read.

If I have one serious criticism, it is that the novel ends without a complete solution or full closure for our characters. I can only hope Patterson produces an equally engaging sequel to finally answer those mysteries and to provide his engaging heroine with an appropriate ending.
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars 6 Sept. 2014
By Montgomeryd3 - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
N/A
3.0 out of 5 stars Good plot and fast-paced, yet needs some paring down 14 Sept. 2014
By An Avid Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Selection is set in a dystopian society where parents choose to genetically enhance their children, and centers around the story of Pembroke Falls, a natural born girl who wants to fit in with the 'Selects.'

I struggle with how to rate this story. On the good, there's an abundance of plot (sometimes, too much plot), and the story is fast-paced. Though it took me longer to read than a story of this genre should, I was interested enough to read to the end.

The bad, and what kept making me set this story down: I found Pembroke annoying through much of the first half of the book, with her incessant desires to fit in. She improved slightly as the book went on, but only just. Perhaps I'm too far removed from my high-school years, but I just couldn't relate to her at all.

In addition, all the Selects were more or less interchangeable. I struggled to keep track of which Select was attacking Pembroke at various times in the novel - and more damning, I just couldn't care. It didn't matter to the plot progression at all. Everyone wants Pembroke dead.

Certain plot points that should be important are just randomly trailed off. For example - whether Pembroke's father is alive or dead seems to be up in the air, but because Pembroke now has a boyfriend, she doesn't seem to care?

The ending of the book was pretty anti-climatic, and riddled with more plot elements (pregnancy, the capture of her sister, etc.) I guess that's the second book.

I've seen YA done better - I've also seen it done far worse. A solid 3-star read.
5.0 out of 5 stars Future world and old problems 25 Jun. 2014
By Flavio Diez - Published on Amazon.com
The book is set in the future where people have new commodities as the result of our technological advances, but at the same time problems derived from past decisions (global warming).

The main character is a high school girl, daughter of one of the most prominent scientists of the time. At the beginning the author show a bit of the daily school life of the future whilst giving a glimpse of the world scenery and what is happening in this world. The population can be divided (although they are not completely secluded into ghettos) into natural born and genetic "prepared" kids. The later ones are physically flawless and every parent dream thanks to the "selection virus", however they suffer a lack of compassion and have a surplus of superiority.

The plot starts to intensify as the book goes on by adding twists and revealing a apocalyptic situation that leads to a scify rich world where some people mutate to a useful form and some just grotesquely.

The plot and its complications are being introduced as the book goes on and the more you read the clearer the picture gets and the pieces start to fall together revealing a intricate story with a world domination plot running in the background.

I recommend this book for every scify fan and can't wait for the follow-up to this book!
4.0 out of 5 stars Dystopian Action Thriller 20 July 2014
By Thornraven - Published on Amazon.com
I received this book in exchange for an honest review.

M. Scott Patterson’s dystopian chronicle of the 22nd century begins deceptively with a world that has survived an apocalypse and moved on to create a society filled with technological miracles. Centered on Pembroke, a naturally born citizen in a society where genetic enhancement is the norm, Selection is part coming of age story, part technological thriller and part apocalyptic horror. The blending of genres should make it unwieldy, but instead keep it riveting as the plot unfolds and Pembroke is forced to develop the strength of will to survive when the technological miracles of her society morph into nightmares of horror and destruction.

Only in the interactions between Pembroke and her love interest, Belem, does the novelist struggle, the writing becoming limited and occasionally cliché. The emotions and interactions never ring as true as they do between Pembroke and her sisters and father. Otherwise, the author is endlessly creative both in terms of the computer and medical technology and what happens when both start to deteriorate into madness. Every time the reader thinks there is nothing worse coming, some worse appears. I look forward to the sequel, Inquisition.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know
click to open popover