Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. Book has been read but is in excellent condition. No missing or damaged pages. Maybe some identifying marks on the inside cover. Quality guaranteed from the largest seller of used books online.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Selected Poems Paperback – 2 Feb 2006

4.2 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.99 £0.01

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
click to open popover

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; Reprint edition (2 Feb. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141025123
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141025124
  • Product Dimensions: 19.3 x 12.7 x 1.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 26,091 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

About the Author

Poet, playwright and freelance writer Carol Ann Duffy was born in Glasgow in 1955, grew up in Staffordshire, and studied philosophy at Liverpool University. She is a former editor of the poetry magazine Ambit and is a regular reviewer and broadcaster. She moved from London to Manchester in 1996 and began to lecture in poetry at Manchester Metropolitan University. She has won many awards in recognition of her work, including the Whitbread Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Signal Prize and the Forward Prize for Poetry. She was awarded an OBE in 1995, a CBE in 2001 and became a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 1999. Carol Ann Duffy lives in Manchester.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The 1p secondhand copy I bought was signed by Carol Ann Duffy: a pleasant surprise.

The poems are tender, elegiac and consummately skilled. Worth buying for ‘Prayer’ alone.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Four Violets TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 Dec. 2009
Format: Paperback
These are excepts from four other volumes of poetry as well as six poems from The World's Wife. I particularly liked the latter, with particularly amusing viewpoints from Mrs Midas, and Mrs Aesop. I also particularly liked two poems from the collection "Selling Manhattan:" "Miles Away," - about missing someone - and "The Virgin Punishing the Infant:" - about the difficulties of being the mother of God when he was a baby. I also liked "Moments of Grace" from "Mean Time," about experiences that make life worth living. This is the first volume of poetry I have read right through and enjoyed for a very long time.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Looking at the last review I suppose its hard to believe this work as credible.

This is a person who writes from heart, belief & experience.

It is clever, incisive, witty, incredibly funny, poignant, dark and so much more.

It displays method as much as content.

From Mrs Darwen to the Onion. Education to Leisure gives a gritty account of an individuals pain.
I want to learn all areas not just 1.

But this is a great place to start
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 29 Nov. 2000
Format: Paperback
Carol Ann Duffy is blessed with the rare gift of describing people and things as they really are, from the inside. Here, you will see people you know, in situations you have been in. Every word is precisely right, in the most satisfying way imaginable. She is not only thematically, but also technically, brilliant. Her poems have new levels which appear with every re-reading. I will never tire of reading this book. Do yourself a favour and buy a copy.
Comment 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I think that there is little doubt that Carol Ann Duffy is the most accomplished of living British poets. Her role as Poet Laureate is of no real significance and it is unlikely that she will ever draw the recognition and affection reserved for such as John Betjeman and Philip Larkin, whose readership extended beyond those with academic literary interests. In part, this is due to her subject matter, or at least its heavy emphasis on feminist issues. In addition a number of her poems – “Shooting Stars”, “Havisham” and “Psychopath” for example, are not for those of a queasy disposition. They are deeply disturbing, and that they are so, is of course a tribute to the power of the best of her writing.

Even in the early poems it is clear that Ms. Duffy is a master of her craft. A poem such as “War Photographer” reveals this, even if what it has to say is scarcely original, nor its communication subtle. There is probably a common perception that the majority of her poems are dark and earnest, but this is to ignore the wit and sometimes exuberant sense of fun, that she brings to much of her poetry. “Valentine” may offer us a rather sour view of the realities of relationships, which are scarcely seen as joyful or nourishing, but she does so with a rich inventiveness that we can enjoy even if we question the cynicism that colours not only the media portrayal of courtship rituals, but love itself – within cutting distance of the knife, “lethal”.

Later a marvellous sense of incongruity raises more than a smile in such poems as the enormously enjoyable “Mrs Midas”. This is one of a series of poems, featuring the wives of famous men, all with feminist sentiments at the heart of them, but richly diverse in other respects. Even the title “Mrs Midas” is funny.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Carol Ann Duffy is the Poet Laureate – a first for any female poet. She is a true original, then, regardless of the huge list of male poets who have come before her. Her work is like her, truly original. It is grounded, sound in every sense, while also being sinewy, unexpected, and often tenderly beautiful.

“ Poetry, above all,” says Duffy, “Is a series of intense moments - its power is not in narrative. I'm not dealing with facts, I'm dealing with emotion.” Nevertheless, she does use narrative, in, for instance her controversial series of feminist poems about the wives of various famous men. Some men who can’t see the joke still reserve a right to be dismissive. Poor things. One of the poems in this collection particularly struck me as indicative of the range and reach of Duffy’s talents and skill. Originally is a poem of universal narrative, proving that poetry can sometimes reach much further than merely aesthetics.

Originally

We came from our own country in a red room
which fell through the fields, our mother singing
our father’s name to the turn of the wheels.
My brothers cried, one of them bawling Home,
Home, as the miles rushed back to the city,
the street, the house, the vacant rooms
where we didn’t live any more. I stared
at the eyes of a blind toy, holding its paw.

All childhood is an emigration. Some are slow,
leaving you standing, resigned, up an avenue
where no one you know stays. Others are sudden.
Your accent wrong. Corners which seem familiar
leading to unimagined pebble-dashed estates, big boys
eating worms and shouting words you don’t understand.
My parents’ anxiety stirred like a loose tooth
in my head. I want our own country, I said.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse