Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Seeing Voices Paperback – 6 Feb 2009

4.6 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 6 Feb 2009
£8.99 £0.01
Audio Cassette
"Please retry"
£52.75
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; Main Market Ed. edition (6 Feb. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330507613
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330507615
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 927,450 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"This book will shake your preconceptions about the deaf, about language and about thought... Sacks [is] one of the finest and most thoughtful writers of our time." --"Los Angeles Times Book Review" "Fascinating and richly rewarding... Sacks is a profoundly wise observer." --"The Plain Dealer ""One cannot read more than a few pages of Sacks without seeing something in a new way. His breadth of understanding and expression seems limitless." --"Kansas City Star ""A remarkable book, penetrating, subtle, persuasive... [It] will likely become a classic." --"St. Louis Post-Dispatch"

Book Description

By the author of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I once saw a documentary about a couple whose daughter was deaf, and they were agonizing about whether to go ahead and have a complex and risky procedure performed which might restore some hearing for their child. I couldn't understand why the father's brother, who was himself profoundly deaf, was so upset that they were even considering this operation.
Having read Oliver Sacks' book, I now have a much greater understanding of how intensely proud deaf people are of their culture. The book describes much of the history of the deaf communities' language and struggle for identity. It reads like a history of a nation struggling for recognition of its rich culture and language. The book also gives many insights into deafness and its causes too, and describes sign language as a fully formed language (or languages!), as rich as any spoken form, but with a quality quite different. It becomes quite clear in the book that deaf people don't necessarily consider themselves 'ill' or 'disabled', but have a human condition which is simply different. This is perhaps why the uncle of the deaf girl in the documentary was upset by his brother's actions---it might be perceived as a kind of prejudice.
I would recommend this book to anyone who is simply interested other cultures, or perhaps just curious about a different human experience which can't be fully imagined if one is not deaf, but still some understanding and appreciation might be gained.
As ever, this Oliver Sacks book is easy to read, like his other popular accounts, and he is not just a passive observer but has many personal tales of his contacts with deaf people, their views and his relationships with them.
Comment 46 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I loved this book and could have wished it twice as long. However, a friend to whom I recommended the book didn't think that highly of it. So to be honest, I guess this book isn't for everyone. It is true that particularly in this book, Sacks gets carried away by lots of long footnotes printed at the bottom of the pages. For me, reading them was like exploring every nook and cranny of a great cathedral. Absolutely enthralling. But for others, it may prove to be rather distracting. If you have ever pondered the endlessly fascinating relationship of language to thinking, you will like this book.
Comment 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a deeply interesting book which should be read by anyone interested in language, and in sign language and the Deaf in particular.

It has its faults; three sections are rather bolted together but the information is clear, there are many interesting side notes that seem to take up about half the book and Sacks has found a real empathy with the deaf without losing objectivity.

My only real criticism is one that the author can't do much about. It was written in the 80s and while it is still very stimulating and thought provoking I now want to know how the situation of the (American) Deaf has progressed in the last quarter century and I'm not sure where to find out yet.

My own interest is that I live in rural Northern Uganda and I come across pre and post lingually deaf folk who have no real way of communicating. Their awareness of the world and ability to think are severely restricted but education in Uganda Sign Language is available if only the connections and parental will can be engaged. So I am seeing the 'native' state of the deaf: isolated, vulnerable, sometimes abused. Its like Europe a few hundred years back.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I love Oliver Sacks's writing because of his excitement, even his passion that he brings to his subjects. In every book of his that I have read, he has infected me with his sense of amazement at the puzzles of the human brain. Even after studying neurology I learned a lot about deafness and language from this book. However, I found the writing to be redundant and the editing to be poor. When he started to repeat the same ideas over and over again I started wondering whether this book had not originally been just a long article for the New York Review of Books. Moreover, many of the most interesting ideas were relegated to the footnotes and this made for very choppy reading. In short, I will always remain a big fan of Oliver Sacks, but I think his writing has improved a lot since he wrote this and I sure won't miss the footnotes if he leaves them out of his next book.
Comment 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have read several of Sacks' books, but this one is pretty much unreadable in Kindle format due to the numerous footnotes. Each footnote is long, sometimes more than a page and I have got lost in the footnotes several times and have no idea where I was in the content. So the narrative does not flow. The problem is that the information in the footnotes is relevant and interesting and should have been incorporates into the body of each chapter gracefully by the editorial team. The jumping about between the text and the all too frequent footnotes disturbs the flow. I persevered for a few days, but got so confused as to where I was I eventually abandoned it.
1 Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A wonderful and insightful book, dont think you can read it quickly. for me it was full of concepts about deafness that i had never concidderd and had to take time to mull over to realy understand. normally i could have read this in a day but instead it took me a month long journy to truly apreceate evrything contained in this wonderful book.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback