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Seeing a Large Cat (Amelia Peabody Mysteries) Mass Market Paperback – 1 Jul 1998

5.0 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Warner Books; Reprint edition (July 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446605573
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446605571
  • Product Dimensions: 10.5 x 3.2 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,181,448 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

I can't wait for the next Peabody story... I really do think Elizabeth Peters' books are great entertainment.' (Angela Rippon)

A writer so popular that the public library has to keep her books under lock and key. (Washington Post Book World)

Think Miss Marple with early feminist gloss crossed with Indiana Jones... accomplished entertainment. (Guardian) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

The year is 1903, the place is Cairo, and it's time for Amelia's ninth adventure. She is asked for help by an old friend whose husband has fallen for a spiritualist; then a plea arrives from an expat colonel whose daughter is threatened by an unknown enemy, and Ramses undertakes an adventure that is guaranteed to turn his mother's hair white! --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I loved this book. It is the first time that we meet Ramses as an adult and see something of the character that he will become, especially bearing in mind the interaction with the other 'young people'. The story is typically intense, and is a jolly good read. In fact, with the development of her characters first glimpsed in this book, Peters has turned a new page in Amelia's chronicles and they just go on getting better from here.
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By J. Chippindale TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 23 July 2007
Format: Paperback
Elizabeth Peters was born and brought up in Illinois and earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.

The Amelia Peabody books may or may not be an acquired taste, personally I love them. They are set in Victorian times when there were still very strict rules of etiquette and polite behaviour was the norm. Although most of the books are set in Egypt, in the desert under very trying conditions and extremely hot weather the `English' way of life was still expected to be adhered to, sometimes with quite hilarious consequences.

Amelia Peabody is Elizabeth Peters' best loved and brilliant creation, a thoroughly Victorian feminist who takes the stuffy world of archaeology by storm with her no nonsense dress sense and forthright opinions.

Once again Amelia Peabody and her family return to their beloved Egypt. They are excited that they have a license to excavate a tomb in the spot that all archaeologists would love to dig, the Valley of the Kings. However they are not working on the exciting find of a new tomb but on clearing one that has already been opened. Emerson is approached by an American, Colonel Bellingham, to come to work for him, but Emerson works only for himself and is not slow in telling the Colonel this. To complicate matters the Colonel's daughter, Dolly needs someone to chaperone her and sets her sights on Ramses (in this book Ramses, Nefret and David are at the young adult stage).

The family is also passed a note warning them to stay away from a tomb that does not exist.
Read more ›
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By Wendy Jones TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 14 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
This book takes us back to Egypt in 1903, with another cracking Amelia Peabody Murder Mystery. Previously I have reviewed another of Elizabeth Peters books, The Last Camel Died at Noon, in which there was a plethora of rather recalcitrant camels. In contrast, this book is riddled with cats. Now, please don't get the impression that this is a book about cats, as it is not, but they do feature rather heavily. For lovers of these books I have to forewarn you that the cat Bastet has been accompanied by Styx to the other side. Never fear, there is a replacement who is just as full of character.

So preliminaries over, what about the book. Amelia Peabody is an aristocratic Englishwoman who is married to an archeologist. She herself is not only an archeologist, but an amateur sleuth. Wherever, she goes she always manages to trip over a dead body. In this book she, her husband, and a large cast of family members discover a new tomb. Funnily enough there is a body inside. This leads to another jolly good jape, full of murder, intrigue and mysterious characters. All the characters are well represented and, of course, given the time and place, exotic. I could picture them perfectly. In many ways the characters are caricatures and larger than life, yet somehow realistic. A difficult trick to pull of but Elizabeth Peter's manages it.

The plot is excellent with a number of red herrings and side turns. This kept me reading, and turning just one more page. The sign of a good murder mystery. This is top notch book which I can highly recommend.
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By Elaine Tomasso TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 29 Jan. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Amelia & family are back in Egypt excavating lesser known tombs but, as usual, their path is strewn with crime. This is a fun read with the children having more prominence than before and an easy way to pass a few hours.
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By Pris on 14 Dec. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am mad about Egypt and its history and to have such wonderful characters and animals just makes its perfect. I have them all on my Kindle and woud now like tohave the actual books as I would read them again.
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Format: Hardcover
Elizabeth Peters was born and brought up in Illinois and earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.

The Amelia Peabody books may or may not be an acquired taste, personally I love them. They are set in Victorian times when there were still very strict rules of etiquette and polite behaviour was the norm. Although most of the books are set in Egypt, in the desert under very trying conditions and extremely hot weather the `English' way of life was still expected to be adhered to, sometimes with quite hilarious consequences.

Amelia Peabody is Elizabeth Peters' best loved and brilliant creation, a thoroughly Victorian feminist who takes the stuffy world of archaeology by storm with her no nonsense dress sense and forthright opinions.

Once again Amelia Peabody and her family return to their beloved Egypt. They are excited that they have a license to excavate a tomb in the spot that all archaeologists would love to dig, the Valley of the Kings. However they are not working on the exciting find of a new tomb but on clearing one that has already been opened. Emerson is approached by an American, Colonel Bellingham, to come to work for him, but Emerson works only for himself and is not slow in telling the Colonel this. To complicate matters the Colonel's daughter, Dolly needs someone to chaperone her and sets her sights on Ramses (in this book Ramses, Nefret and David are at the young adult stage).

The family is also passed a note warning them to stay away from a tomb that does not exist.
Read more ›
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